OT: Mathematical Conundrum II



Ah, a fellow enthusiast. I dream about "kindling my desires with Mrs S under her tiger-skin duvet" :-)
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On 01/12/2015 10:22, News wrote:

Yup my memory of it was ordinary milk - but often warm and not looked after too well!

Talk about clue resistant...!

My first junior school, it was delivered to class, and a milk monitor would hand them out (and another privileged individual chosen on the day) would go round with the little punch to make holes in the foil top so you could get your straw through!)
Second school, we had to wander off to the dining area to collect it.
--
Cheers,

John.
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Yes, this was at infant school (not even junior school). Maybe for younger children the policy was to deliver the crates of milk to class as opposed to letting the older children collect it themselves from the dining room or playground. I remember the ritual of the "milk monitor", though I don't remember a punch. I think each person simply had to stick their thumb into the foil top, with loads of opportunities for pressing too hard and squirting milk over everyone else. And I remember the waxed-paper (not plastic!) straws which the milk monitor handed out from a large square brown cardboard box.
Nowadays if they offered milk at school (whether free or paid-for from dinner money) they'd have to keep the bottles in a fridge and they'd have to have a selection of blue (full-fat, wi' nowt tekken out), green (semi-skimmed) and red (skimmed-and-watery), as well as goats' milk and milk made from rice, soya and various other vegetable substitutes. Imagine the logistical problems of getting the right milk to the right person!
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And there were some people who never got the technique, so theirs always squirted hem hem. The technique was to press with thumb, but with iron control over the muscles so you could stop pressing the instant it started to move.
--
"That which can be asserted without evidence, can be dismissed without
evidence."
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On 01/12/15 11:37, Tim Streater wrote:

Now what was it we were discussing again?¿
--
the biggest threat to humanity comes from socialism, which has utterly
diverted our attention away from what really matters to our existential
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Search me. <whistles>
--
"People don't buy Microsoft for quality, they buy it for compatibility
with what Bob in accounting bought last year. Trace it back - they buy
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On Tue, 01 Dec 2015 03:23:51 +0000, John Rumm wrote:

I remember sixpences stopping being accepted in shops, and going down to spend the last couple in my piggybank. But shillings/two shillings were OK, because they were the same as 5/10p.
Even then, at 5 or so, I thought it was an odd way to work, and why did we have to have this out-of-date rubbish still kicking about.
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Because at 5 you had no poetry in your soul. ;-)
I came from a decimal economy (US) to the UK in 1965 and loved the British currency. So much more interesting than cent, nickels, dimes, quarters & dollars.
Tim
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wrote:

I think Adrian also wants to change all the expressions in the language too. "A miss is as good as a kilometre", anyone? I expect also he'll name his child "Kilometres" instead of "Miles".
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On 01/12/2015 09:26, Tim Streater wrote:

While humming the tune to 2.54cm worm ;-)
--
Cheers,

John.
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On 01/12/15 11:07, John Rumm wrote:

Give an ethnic minority 25.4 mm and he will take about 457 mm, that's what I say...
--
the biggest threat to humanity comes from socialism, which has utterly
diverted our attention away from what really matters to our existential
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What's the significance of 457 mm (about 18")? According to the standard phrase, I'd expect him to take 1,609,344 mm.
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<snip>

It's always struck me as typically British that we change everything, but keep pints for beer and miles for roads.
--
Jim S

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Let's not forget MPG. I mean who in their right mind would ever want to change over to litres per 100km? It's a system that only makes a bit of sense if you've never had a "man sized" measure of fuel. Of course now we're stuck with converting litres to gallons before we can work our our MPG but that's still preferable to changing over to L/100km. ;-)
Tim
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I set up a spreadsheet which does all this for me: given start mileage, end mileage, amount of fuel, total cost and date, it gives me mpg (which is miles/litre * litres/gallon), cost per litre, and plots consumption and fuel prices on graphs as a function of date so I can look for trends. I also record the average mpg that my car's trip computer reports and plot this against my calculated mpg - sadly although there is *some* correlation between the two, there is also a great deal of scatter and the best fit line is laughable (you'd expect it to have a gradient of 1 and to go through zero if there was good correlation, but it's nowhere near, so the car's mpg figures are largely fictitious! A gradient of a little under or a little over would be fair enough if it consistently under- or over-read, but I'd still expect the intercept to be close to zero.
The only thing that I've not managed to automate is the plotting of the graphs: every time I add a new row for a new tank filling, I have to adjust each graph's formula to increment the row number that defines the end of the data series.
On the subject of miles versus km, I was told when I went over to the Republic of Ireland that when they changed from miles to km, they changed the distance signs to km, and all modern cars were made to a strange spec: right hand drive, but with speedo calibrated primarily in km/hr. However they deliberately left the speed limit signs in mph because they did not want anyone to see a speed limit in km/hr (which is a *larger* figure than the equivalent mph) and try to claim that they thought that it was an mph limit :-) So you see a limit and have to read it off the smaller, less conspicuous figures on the car's speedo, which takes a bit of getting used to!
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On Tue, 01 Dec 2015 15:38:10 +0000, NY wrote:

Why is that the "strange" spec, rather than RHD/miles?
As well as Eire, are another two European countries (Cyprus and Malta) that use that combo, and only us that use "our" way. Then there's the various other global RHD markets - Australia, Japan, India, Malaysia, most of Southern Africa, Caribbean - who all use km.
Globally, there is only one country that is RHD and uses miles. The UK. All the other countries who use miles (the US, Liberia and Myanmar, plus a handful of tiddlers) are LHD.
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On Tue, 01 Dec 2015 15:18:28 +0000, Tim+ wrote:

It makes _at least_ as much sense to say "How much fuel does it take to go a certain distance?" as to say "How far can I go on a certain amount of fuel?".
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On 01/12/15 16:01, Adrian wrote:

except smaller numbers are better in the latter case, worse in the first.
--
the biggest threat to humanity comes from socialism, which has utterly
diverted our attention away from what really matters to our existential
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Foolish boy. This isn't about "sense". This is about what is right and proper, and not giving in to Johnny Foreigner nonsense. ;-)
Tim
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On Tue, 01 Dec 2015 16:36:44 +0000, Tim+ wrote:

Well, quite.
If the convention here was "How much fuel does it take to go a certain distance?" and somebody suggested "How far can I go on a certain amount of fuel?", there would be a huge outcry about how wrong it all was, and how OUR WAY was so much better.
Of course, the ridiculousness is merely compounded by the only other major country in the world who use "miles per gallon" using a different sized gallon...
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