OT: Look North Leeds bias

On Sun, 02 Aug 2015 00:02:50 +0100

My ancient rusting bike in the garage has one of those. When it ran, it could use either the upper three gears or the lower three gears, depending on where you adjusted the control chain. But never all 4 gears.
Offers accepted.....
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Davey.

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It might have been rare then Mark but its a damm sight rarer nowadays!.
Not one of my daughters boyfriends had any idea how a car engine even worked let alone any idea how to fix it;!.....
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Tony Sayer



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scribeth thus

Mock ye not. We gave our old Octavia to daughter about 18 months ago before she got married. They live in the south west and had been up to see us last Autumn and were driving back when the little oil-can light came on. She rang in a panic as to what it meant.
My daughter has a PhD and is a senior lecturer at one of the countries most popular universites. He husband does the Intranet for one of the mobile SPs. Neither of them even had the idea to RTFM!!
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Woody

harrogate3 at ntlworld dot com
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Two things:
First, cars really are harder to home fix now by someone who is just starting out, harder to just start fiddling with. My first car, a fiesta, had an engine that would have fitted twice over in the compartment and every bit was identifiable and understandable - and no electronics.
My current car, you would need a confidence boost before you were prepared to even start looking for the engine under all the matt black covers and plating, let alone start working on it.
Second, young people don't seem to buy old crocks any more - you used to have to keep working on them just to keep them going but they all seem to drive around in flash numbers that are only a few years old. :-)
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No they don't do that there're deprived, they have no idea of the joys of decoking an olde moggy minor or trying to change the fan belt on a Mini beside the road in the pouring rain, poor sods.!.
Understood theres waay to much expensive electric's in the modern motah I was just told that a replacement dashboard for a new style Audi A 6 was around 1800 squids!.
And I do see hapless taxi drivers in a workshop being told their ECU needs changing and thats the price of a second-hand motah.
However a bit of knowledge of how the thingy works, and that hasn't changed since Mercedes was a girl, doesn't go amiss:)...
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Tony Sayer




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On Tue, 4 Aug 2015 21:56:16 +0100

Don't forget the Moggy when its left front wheel falls off after a sharp left turn. The result of not lubricating the screw thread that comprises the vertical part of the wheel's support.
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Davey.

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They are in fact MUCH easier to fix now when a $10 OBDII adapter will tell you which bit has failed and you just change that.

And much harder to work out what has failed when something does.

Bullshit.
And you don't have anything like the same level of routine maintenance like timing and plugs to do as you used to have to do either.

Corse they do. I have just recently had one knock on the door to ask me why the brakes where getting literally stinking hot when he was test driving it, because he still had the handbrake on. He later had me get a set of tools for him from the garage sales and had me show him how to change the plugs etc.

Plenty don't.
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In my old Nissan Primera, everything was controlled by micro processors. Everything was preset in the factory for the life of engine. There was nothing to tinker with. I got rid of the car after 16 years. The engine ran perfectly all those years.
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Martin in Zuid Holland




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And everything's status codes and flashing icons these days. We bought a brand new car and later that day, after driving it for about 30 miles, it suddenly lost power and an engine-management icon started to flash, with no other information. Given that the car has two LCD displays, you'd think they could have displayed a message describing what the fault was that had been detected.
Fortunately the loss of power was only temporary and the car was fine to drive to the garage in the morning where they spent ages checking it out thoroughly. Apparently it was a fault in a sensor that measures turbo boost pressure, which temporarily put the car into limp home mode until the fault cleared - but the flashing warning continued until it was manually reset by the garage.
Similarly my Peugeot has just started giving a warning about the diesel particulate filter and it actually displays a message, though it says "Risk of filter blocking" without saying whether it's fuel, air or particulate filter :-( Given that the car hasn't done much stop-start urban driving and has had long runs which will heat up the DPF to burn off the soot, I suspect this too is a case of a transient fault which is no longer being detected but has latched on until the garage reset it.
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On Wed, 5 Aug 2015 08:35:20 +0100

I had a Pontiac in the US, that was a blast to drive, but after 120,000 miles it started to lose communication with the ECU, so it ran in limp mode, and wouldn't tell anybody what was wrong. Only the tachometer worked. Every garage wanted to charge $80 just to plug the analyser in, and then to change the ECU, which wasn't the problem and would have cost at least a couple of hundred bucks. On its last journey, I had to sit at traffic lights with the revs. above 3500 to keep it from stalling. (This on Detroit's 8 Mile Road).
--
Davey.

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On 05/08/2015 07:50, Martin wrote:

I heard of somebody scrapping a Nissan Sunny because of excessive rust, and they tried to haggle with the breakers about the scrap value because the engine ran beautifully. He was told that the engine was worthless because nobody ever needed another one.
Jim
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On Wed, 05 Aug 2015 11:04:51 +0100, Indy Jess John

There was no rust on my Primera. Plastic parts were getting a bit brittle though. As far as I know, the car was deregistered and shipped to Africa. There's a car transporter that takes old cars from the Europoort(Rotterdam) to West Africa once a month.
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Martin in Zuid Holland




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On 05/08/15 14:12, Martin wrote:

Yup. ISTR BIL had an omega that maxed out at 220k miles on original engine. Just was falling apart bodywork wise and a lot of MOT stuff came all at once.
Commercial diesels reckon on a million miles don't they?
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New Socialism consists essentially in being seen to have your heart in
the right place whilst your head is in the clouds and your hand is in
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My Peugeot 306 had done 160k miles when I sold it after 10 years, and it was still in good condition (mechanically and body) but it had got to the stage when it started to cost more - two new fan belts (second was because first had failed due to bent pulley rather than just due to age of belt, and first garage hadn't noticed that but wouldn't pay for second repair), new cat or turbo (I forget which) etc. But it survived a further couple of years - its final MOT expired on its 13th birthday so I presume it was scrapped some time just before then.
And my present Peugeot 308 has done 156k miles so far in 7 years and that's still running perfectly - still bags of power and fuel economy is still good. And still on original clutch which is incredible - every other car I've has has needed a new clutch at about 70k. I've had a few niggly problems with the emissions and anti-pollution system - it's in the garage at the moment having a warning with the diesel particulate filter investigated (*) and the fuel-additive system (sounds a bit like AdBlue that commercial vehicles use) had to be replaced a while ago. That's excluding the normal wear-and-tear things like brakes and routine things like new cambelt at about 140k miles.
It may well get up to the 220k miles that your BIL's car managed but I doubt I'll keep it long enough for it to reach the million ;-)
(*) It's probably sulking because my wife's just got a new car and we'll be using that for most of our holidays and days out from now on :-)
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The drivers seat on my 309 wore out at about 100k miles - so I managed to swap it with the front passenger's one. But all sorts of silly things kept needing replacing - all adding up to far more than the car was worth.
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On 05/08/15 15:10, Charles Hope wrote:

That is usually the case.
but 'what the car is worth' is a moveable feast. Often a car whose record you know is worth a lot more than you will ever sell it for.
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On Wed, 05 Aug 2015 16:18:11 +0100

You can do an awful lot of repairs for the cost of buying a new car.
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True, but being stuck at the roadside while you wait for a tow is not my idea of fun.
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On Thu, 06 Aug 2015 06:24:02 +0100

That depends on your level of maintenance!
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a great many faults cannot be eliminated by maintenance. eg How do you know a piston ring is going to break? These days most faults seem to be caused by faulty sensors - again not a mainetnance issue.
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