OT Gridwatch - demand slowly ramping up

Following on from other Gridwatch references I've had the web site up open for a few days now.
It looks as though demand is slowly going up each day, nuclear and CCGT are at the top end of their range (presumably most nuclear reactors are now on line) and coal is slowly ramping up.
With this grey overcast and the cold weather it is beginning to look as though if the wind drops we could be pushing the boundaries a bit.
Fortunately it looks as though we are still in windy times. Although Thursday and Friday seem to have lower wind speeds predicted.
Realistically, how close are we to demand outstripping supply?
How much 'headroom' do we have if we get the traditional "USA weather two weeks later" with snow and freezing temperatures?
Just wondering
Dave R
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Well any demand for energy certainly isn't coming from car headlights.
Visibility is down to 100m in places, and about 2/3 of cars are dark.
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Be a neat trick to power cars from the mains. I do gather that after such a long time brits are very economical with lights on cars. all a bit lost on me of course, but I wonder how they got on in the war during the black outs? Brian
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On Tue, 9 Jan 2018 18:22:41 -0000, "Brian Gaff"

With difficulty ,but there were far fewer cars on the road and for many fuel rationing meant they weren't used as freely as before the war. Lots of white paint on kerbs, trees and potential hazards some of which was still visible well into the 70's. Vehicles themselves had often had wings bumpers and running boards painted white,a sensible precaution in era when most cars were black and other colours if available were dark shades. Bicycles had white painted on the rear mudguard which often remains on old examples. Pedestrians still got killed in large numbers with over 1100 killed in the first month of the blackout and whose death was attributed to it.
In those places that had them following a tram or the lines was a useful way of not driving into the kerb.
G.Harman
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On 09/01/18 20:00, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

Given the lack of street lighting in some places and the tendency to turn it off later at night (or all the time in some cash strapped areas) we should go back to whitening things...

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wrote:

I expect we do have a lot better reflective surfaces now and many bends will be marked with chevrons ,in some places there is an excess road of signs with reflective surfaces. I live in a village without any street lighting and like it that way as do the majority of the residents. A lot people don't get to find out that except on really filthy nights how much you can see once the eyes have been allowed to adjust to the conditions.
One thing that has helped those who venture out at night now compared with previous generations is the LED which offers bright torches that don't eat through a load of Every Ready batteries each week and clothing fitted with Leds is now common place as well as ordinary reflective tabards ,armbands etc being easily obtained . Somewhere there will be a line as to what is best, providing lighting which may well be money wasted if no one passes in a quiet area or passing the cost onto the small numbers of people passing by expecting them to carry decent personal lighting instead. Where that line is placed could be a source of much debate but I think it has moved in recent times now a small light pocket torch easily outshines a hand lantern with a 6 volt battery from a couple of decades ago.
One thing I did not mention about the WW2 blackout was that pedestrians were advised to carry a newspaper at night to hopefully act as a reflector.
G.Harman
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On Tue, 09 Jan 2018 20:48:04 +0000, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

to

Dark Skies. There must be a great many people who have never seen anything but the brightest stars/planets. It's quite a sight to look up on a clear moonless night and see the Milky Way arching across the sky and so many stars that it makes it hard to pick out the constelations.

Or like find out what "dark" really means. Dark as in eyes open, not able to see *anything*, not the faintest of glows, not a pinpoint, absolulely nothing, decidely disturbingly dark.

With the tendancy of outdoor clothing to be dark and wet road surfaces being dark pedestrians are well advised to carrying something light coloured or have reflective arm bands, even in street lit areas.
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On Wed, 10 Jan 2018 00:08:52 +0000, Dave Liquorice wrote:

And if a vehicle is approaching, move the light thing or arm bands. More noticeable.
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We had that in Norfork recently when approaching someone walking a dog (on the right side of the road) but the first thing we saw of them was the flash of a (moving) torch (still a reasonable distance away etc).
Had they been wearing anything bright or even better, reflective, I may have seen them sooner and would have preferred that.
When buying an outdoor / waterproof jacket I see if I can get something with some form of reflective component. My current one has reflective piping for example (very 'Tron' like). ;-)
Cheers, T i m
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On Wed, 10 Jan 2018 00:22:43 +0000, Bob Eager wrote:

Driving about 7am yesterday, there was a pedestrian wearing something which *really* lit up/stood out. It was some sort of white coat, but the retroreflection must have been well over 50% ...
It was a very sensible choice, since the space inside the hood was an inky void, due to the wearers pigmentation.
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On 10/01/2018 11:03, Jethro_uk wrote:

I have a Rohan cycling jacket that looks grey in daylight but shines white at night because the entire fabric is coated with scotchlite.
Unfortunately, it makes you sweat because the coating overpowers the Rohan fabric design.
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On Wed, 10 Jan 2018 16:16:25 +0000, Andrew wrote:

I can understand that. Rohan stuff usually works well, and I wear it most days.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk says...

Even in the 60s I remember the COI film on TV exhorting us to "wear something light at night".
Featured an attractive blonde wearing a raincoat, IIRC.
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On 09/01/18 20:48, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

True, sometimes more dazzling than un-dipped headlights

Wonderfull clear night tonight, stars I haven't seen for years.

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On 09/01/2018 20:48, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

The junction at the end of our road was remodelled a couple of years ago after several people failed to give way and were killed.
The new layout is excessively signed. At night you can't see anything except the signs as they reflect so much.
Andy
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk says...

It can backfire, though.
I remember driving around the Hague, following the tram lines in broad daylight.
I very nearly failed to spot that the road turned left while the tram lines carried straight onto reserved track!
Fortunately I spotted my error in time to just avoid driving straight off the road!
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Round here, people use headlights in anything other than bright sunlight. Never did quite understand the theory. Other than making the vehicle more visible to pedestrians with poor eyesight. And I doubt many care about those.
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Unlit country lane here. Closing yard gates etc. I often come across cyclists using forward facing lamps roughly equivalent to a car headlight. Fine if it makes them feel safer but, when it is mounted on their helmet and they look to see what is standing by the road, has a blinding effect. I've not yet met one while driving but suspect this might actually be dangerous.

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Common with many motorcycles too. Set the headlamp to create maximum dazzle. On the assumption they are more likely to be seen. Therefore putting the onus on others to avoid them, rather than by driving in a safe way.
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On Wed, 10 Jan 2018 11:40:19 +0000, Tim Lamb

And potentially illegal:
http://www.lightmare.org/the_law.htm
"114 You MUST NOT
use any lights in a way which would dazzle or cause discomfort to other road users, including pedestrians, cyclists and horse riders"

And illegal. ;-)
Cheers, T i m
p.s. And this one winds me up ...
"In stationary queues of traffic, drivers should apply the parking brake and, once the following traffic has stopped, take their foot off the footbrake to deactivate the vehicle brake lights. This will minimise glare to road users behind until the traffic moves again."
Especial when in a std car behind a 4X4 or big SUV etc.
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