OT d-i-y anti blood clot


wrote:

BULLSHIT. I don’t smoke and that's not what the protocol here says either.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 15/01/2017 11:20, Huge wrote:

??
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 15 Jan 2017 22:42:10 +0000, nospam wrote:

Presumably it treats a particular kind of 'stickiness' mostly produced by smoking?
It was prescribed for elderly M-I-L years ago, and she hadn't smoked for about 30 years at the time.
--
My posts are my copyright and if @diy_forums or Home Owners' Hub
wish to copy them they can pay me £1 a message.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

No it doesn’t.

It was prescribed to me quite recently and I have never smoked.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clopidogrel says nothing about smokers, Huge is wrong, as usual.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 12 Jan 2017 13:59:18 +0000, GB wrote:

You're basically having to make a choice with a certain amount of pot- luck here. You could take an aspirin and it might well save your life if it's a block, but might well kill you if it's a bleed. Question is, what is your overall health profile like? Which is it most likely to be for your profile type? And how lucky do you feel today, punk?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/01/2017 13:32, whisky-dave wrote:

Anticoagulants do *not* thin the blood. I'm amazed how many people in the medical profession propagate this myth.
Anticoagulants either interfere with the platelets normal reaction to a cut or injury, where they literally stick together and plug the damage (Aspirin), or they act on the clotting mechanism that follows on from the initial wound and slow down or intefere with the intermediate steps that result in strands of polymerised fibrin getting intermeshed with the platelet plug (Warfarin and others).
Neither aspirin, nor warfarin have any effect on your blood viscosity, but if your normal red cell count is at the top end of normal then this will increase the blood viscosity which is another added risk factor as you age.
People whose age, lifestyle or genetics results in the deposition of the wrong sort of cholesterol along the walls of their blood vessels are at risk from strokes when blood platelets and white cells get stuck on these adhesions, ultimately causing a stroke.
Think fatbergs in the sewers with added wetwipes and tampons and you've got the picture.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

An aneurism is something quite different, the blood vessel blowing out like a balloon and then bursting. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aneurysm

Certainly what happened to a mate of mine, and killed him.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, 12 January 2017 16:43:50 UTC, Rod Speed wrote:

and thsat can;t b cured or stopped by taking asprin.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, 12 January 2017 12:59:49 UTC, john.west wrote:

100% chocolate, garlic cloves, beetroot juice and V8.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/01/2017 14:19, Simon Mason wrote:

I would suggest having a blood count to see what your own normal white cell and platelet counts are.
If you are the sort of person where your normal levels are near the top end of the normal range then I would be tempted to suggest that you are more at risk from strokes and/or heart disease. So even more important to avoid getting overweight or smoking.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload



The problem with those is the time till they take effect.
Its unlikely that any of those will make any difference when waiting for the ambulance to show up.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, 12 January 2017 16:47:45 UTC, Rod Speed wrote:

I started on them 30 years ago though.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/01/17 12:59, john.west wrote:

can do, but serious doses of aspirin are as good as it gets.
--
To ban Christmas, simply give turkeys the vote.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, 12 January 2017 12:59:49 UTC, john.west wrote:

It's Coca not cocoa they consume in South America https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coca_tea
The locals use it in traditional medicine. There's no proof it's good for anything.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/01/2017 12:59, john.west wrote:

Keep snakes ?.
Notably the breed that is used to manufacture the snake venom clot-busting drugs that are (or used to be) used by the NHS.
Other than avoiding smoking, and getting overweight all you can do is get enough exercise and eat proper food. Administering clot busting drugs is not DIY, even if you were still actually able to consider it.
A quarter of a standard aspirin a day (75 mg) might help, plus beetroot juice for those who aren't repulsed by the taste.
Eating fermented soya beans (Natto) might be beneficial according to Kate Quilton on C4 Food Unwrapped.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/01/2017 15:18, Andrew wrote:

Some years ago I had a heart attack. The only difference between a heart attack and a stroke is where the clot cuts off the blood. anyway after very thorough examination I was found to have the arteries and heart of a much younger man, it was a puzzle. Then my heart started beating an irregular rhythm, this it seems was the cause. I was put on Warfarin, which was a PITA. after while they changed it to Dabitran, which was much less intrusive. I have no idea when the heart "miss beats" Incidentally as soon as I got into the ambulance they gave me asprin.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/01/2017 15:28, Broadback wrote:

In Sweden every adult carries a soluble aspirin which is administered to anyone who has symptoms of a heart attack while waiting for the ambulance.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That is because heart attacks are a heart struggling to get enough oxygen from the blood supply and normally this is due to a clot or a blockage due to furring up, but in the brain if a blood vessel punctures and bleeds it can cut of circulation but also floods the area with blood, if you have a blood thinner stopping the blead is far harder. See my other post. My mother died of a bleed, after a stroke so you cannot win sometimes, if the chips are down, its all a lottery. Brian
--
----- -
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12-Jan-17 3:18 PM, Andrew wrote: ...

75mg dose enteric coated aspirin are available over the counter.
--
--

Colin Bignell
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Do bear in mind though that even low dose aspirin can cause major, and sometimes fatal, internal bleeding.
Tim
--
Please don't feed the trolls

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.