OT: a small but insistent voice says I must go out and kill

Hil says the gravelled area where the vehicles are parked is a disgrace. I am instructed that I must find a remedy. Does anyone know of something I can spray on that will kill moss, grass, weeds, the lot? Preferably for ever? Roundup kills things that have leaves but they soon sprout again. And then there's the moss...
Bill
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Not really no. We have a gravel drive which I have to treat two or three times a year with a herbicide that I am only allowed to use because I have been on an appropriate training course.
The best you can do is to use Pathclear or something like that but, personally, I think you'll find it costly and not very effective in the long run.
Sodium Chlorate used to be the answer but for several reasons is no longer allowed to be sold.
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Chris Green
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Yes depriving small boys of their bomb making material, I guess.
Brian
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On 12/19/2016 6:04 PM, Bill Wright wrote:

Concrete.
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Yes but concrete has other issues, like drainage and flooding and cracking up with frost.
We used to put copper tape on roves to stop moss. Brian
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Not if you do it properly.

Ditto.

Roves have been banned.

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Bill Wright wrote:

The best man to answer your question is Chris Hogg. He may be along soon...
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On 19/12/16 18:04, Bill Wright wrote:

Most of the products available from garden centres to keep paths clear for more than a few months don't work that well. The general rule of thumb is that anything the amateur can buy over the counter is safe but ineffective. If you can find a professional (eg local park gardener) who can get hold of decent stuff, maybe some might fall your way.
That would be illegal to use, of course, as the product wouldn't be licensed for public use. Similarly anything I might recommend that isn't licensed to kill plants would also be illegal to use. But, of course, if you used the product to clean the gravel, or spilt it by accident, or some other plant-unrelated reason, there wouldn't be a problem.
One question I would ask is are there any wanted plants growing nearby, or is the gravel surrounded by paving? If the former, I would be very wary of applying anything which might leach into flower beds and the like. If the latter, you could try keeping the gravel free of ice and snow with rock salt or something similar. You would have to keep reapplying it every now and again as nothing works permanently. Being up t'north, though, you might need to apply it all year round just in case of a snowstorm, even in summer.
If you want a bit of hard work, but a more effective solution, rake the gravel aside and put weed-proof membrane down, then rake the gravel back.
--

Jeff

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On 19/12/2016 18:50, Jeff Layman wrote:

Would something like household bleach work? I'm not sure why that would be illegal to use in the garden? If it gets trodden onto the carpets it could turn out to be expensive.
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Nope, most stuff will just yawn.

Trouble is that it doesn’t work for long.

Yeah, when you drench the carpets in more bleach you would have to use quite a bit of bleach.
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On 19/12/16 19:02, GB wrote:

The use of anything which affects plant growth (other than as a fertiliser) is prohibited under EU law unless it has been tested for quality. safety, and efficacy and licensed for that purpose.
Whether anyone has ever been prosecuted for unapproved use of anything under those circumstances I have no idea!
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Jeff

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That is just plain wrong with countless chemicals.

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On 19/12/16 19:02, GB wrote:

The use of anything which affects plant growth (other than as a fertiliser) is prohibited under EU law unless it has been tested for quality. safety, and efficacy and licensed for that purpose.
Whether anyone has ever been prosecuted for unapproved use of anything under those circumstances I have no idea!
--

Jeff

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Gardeners' Question Time often tells you that aphids don't like being sprayed with soapy water - and then reminds you that to spray them with soapy water would now be illegal (wink-wink, nudge-nudge).
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Ian

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On 20/12/2016 16:23, Ian Jackson wrote:

I'm astonished. Compost is often said to aid plant growth, yet nobody's been round to approve my compost.
Are you quite sure there's been no misunderstanding here?
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writes

Compost is not a chemical. Soap is.

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Ian

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Absolutely *everything* is a chemical of one sort or another.
Water is H2O (a fairly pure chemical if it's reasonably clean water).
Sand is mostly silica (SiO2) but usually has lots of other stuff (chemicals) in it.
etc. etc.
--
Chris Green
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writes

Oh, FFS - we've got a right couple of comedians here!
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Ian

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writes

Wrong. Everything is a chemical, stupid.

And so is air, but blowing it on your plants with a fan is perfectly legally acceptable. As is watering your plants. And pissing on them is too.
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On 20/12/16 16:56, GB wrote:

No. As I said, fertilisers (and composts) do not need approval. It's basically the pesticide side of things which needs approval - herbicides, insecticides, fungicides, molluscicides, etc.
--

Jeff

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