New MOT test coming in.

https://www.uswitch.com/car-insurance/car-mot-how-to-check-mot-history-and- get-reminders/?responsys_campaign_id=uswitch.14225202&responsys_riid 75305042&responsys_launch_id270842&e_id_m
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Had my MoT done yesterday. It wasn't to beat the change, as I didn't know about the change when I booked it in.
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Andrew Gabriel
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though is there in fact a new "test"
or is it just a new way of recording failures
tim
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tim... wrote on 18/05/2018 :

Both..
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On 18/05/2018 17:12, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

[quote] New checks The new MOT test will involve some new checks, including whether tyres are underinflated, if brake fluid has been contaminated and if brake pads or discs are missing. [/quote]
I'm sure a car without brake pads or disks would fail the existing brake efficiency tests.
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mailto : news admac myzen co uk



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On 18/05/2018 18:19, alan_m wrote:

And how are they going to know whether my kit-car's tyres are underinflated? What chart are they goign to find teh figure on?
SteveW
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wrote:

That was also one of my concerns too, they won't have access to manufacturers data and we have routinely run the pressures lower for 30+ years. Quite what they'd make of a tyre with 18psi in it I don't know.
The legal aspects of someone self presenting a 40+ year old car for an MOT, getting a fail on 'something' and then they carry on using the vehicle as if it had never been presented for an MOT are a minefield.
Would a failure without a subsequent successful retest mean that forever and a day the ANPR system would flag up a problem?
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This is something I have thought long and hard about, concerning my 50 year old Traveller, which now no longer needs an MOT test. Whilst I'm capable of checking most things, I am seriously tempted to ask my local garage to give the vehicle a 'mock MOT' once a year, just in case I miss something. Quite what the legal position would be if they pointed out something fairly major, which I ignored, I don't know, although doubt I would come out smelling of roses.
--
Graeme

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Having been to an old car show this weekend, noticed that the age of the owners seems to be going up much in line with my own. Although there were plenty younger people as spectators.
Dunno if it's going out of fashion as a hobby like so many other things, or just that old farts are likely to have more disposable cash for any hobby.
Point being it's far more of an effort to examine the underside of a car well as you get older. Hence me being very against exempting any classic from a basic MOT as regards safety.
--
*Ambition is a poor excuse for not having enough sense to be lazy *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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It’s not just the cash, to keep an older vehicle you really need somewhere under cover or at a minimum some good off road parking and a shed for tools, paints spares safe.
That option isn’t available to many younger people especially if they have had to move away from parents who may have had a space in a barn or shed. And if they are still living at home in their 20’s the space for a vehicle may be in use to store other possessions and spending money on an old vehicle not a priority. Even amongst those who have got on the property ladder many houses have had garages or land where a shed was converted to living space. Sometimes a bit naughtily, a house I looked at years ago had a garage door .Behind it was a wall and another room where the garage used to be but the external door left in place so it still looked like an integral garage.
GH
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Mine is kept on the street. Means it has to be taxed year round though. No shed here either.
--
*I don't suffer from insanity; I enjoy every minute of it.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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As you said older people tend to have more disposable income, if your vehicle needs something serious repaired say a gearbox do you do that on the road or pay others to do it or hire a workshop. A younger persons affordable entry into older vehicle ownership may well be something that needs a lot of restoration work rather than purchasing something that only needs polishing. By the nature of being young they won’t have the other option of owning and keeping a vehicle in good order for so much of their life that was an ordinary non remarkable car has become interesting as both owner and vehicle become old.
GH
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Used to do everything on the road. That has changed more due to my age than anything else.

May well be - but doesn't mean they have the skills or the desire to learn them, to DIY. I blame it on the lack of Meccano for kids. ;-)

Just because you happen to have owned a car for a long time doesn't mean it hasn't needed restoration work. But may have been less stressful to do it as required than to start out with a basket case.
The odd thing is electrical/electronic skills seem to be even less common than once, as regards car stuff. And I'd say even more needed. Odd considering the exposure of all to electronics.

--
*It IS as bad as you think, and they ARE out to get you.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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wrote:

Not odd at all given how little maintenance that electronics needs now.
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On Tuesday, 29 May 2018 20:42:29 UTC+1, Rod Speed wrote:

True, valves are so much better now that I seldom need to replace one.
NT
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On 30-May-18 1:05 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Many electronic items are of low value and not worth the effort and cost. £20 radio/alarm throw it away and get a new one. £30 USB turntable, tiaagano. TV's in the 60/70's used to be a months wages, now unless very big high res they are a weeks. In the 60/70's spending £50 to fix a £400 TV was worthwhile and £50 paid for a days work + parts. Now £50 wouldn't pay to get someone out to get the case open but the TV is still only £400.
About the only large electronic repair sector these days are phones and maybe laptops. Things like new screens or batteries. No real electronic skill or knowledge needed, it's all just mechanical assembly to replace a module.
White goods like microwaves, dishwashers and washing machines all have electronic controls. The makers don't provide service on these they just change the module. Again just mechanical assembly, so they only employ repair technicians and not electronic engineers.
How many car ECU's fail? It needs very specialized test equipment. Due to high level of integration it needs specialized SMD/Hybrid repair techniques. There are a few places that have made the investment. If you go to a franchised main dealer again it is just mechanical assembly, they can't do component level electronic repair so you have to buy a new ECU.
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On Wednesday, 30 May 2018 08:27:45 UTC+1, Peter Hill wrote:

.
50

parts.

TV

I've repaired all sorts of things, but largely because I want to & can. Few seem to be into that now, mainly middle aged & older folks.
NT
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On Wednesday, 30 May 2018 14:49:30 UTC+1, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

ow.

.
B

?50

+ parts.

he TV

t

u

w

ew seem to be into that now, mainly middle aged & older folks.

Things can't be repaired that easily any more. I used to repair/replace the memoery chips in the BBC computer, finding out which of the memory addresses was faulty then locating teh actual RAM chip and replacing. I bet you can;t do that with a modern PC or Mac you just re place the whole DIMM. Any fool could change a valve or even a transistor but it's a bit more diff icult now isolating such things.
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On Wednesday, 30 May 2018 15:38:26 UTC+1, whisky-dave wrote:

now.

ne.

USB

ow

£50

k + parts.

the TV

nd

ic

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e

ust

y

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you

new

Few seem to be into that now, mainly middle aged & older folks.

some can, some can't. I often prefer ones that can.
NT
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wrote in message

But its stupid to be paying a lot more for those that can and for the parts needed to repair them.
Yes, its possible to repair a Bosch dishwasher, but when the integrated pump and heater costs more than a new dishwasher, it makes no sense to be replacing that instead of just buying a new one if that fails.
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