multipurpose tools: Bosch and Aldi

On 30/10/11 10:33, Fred wrote:

i have the green bosch PMF and about a dozen different blades for it fantastically useful, florboards etc, aggressive sander, etc etc
[g]
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On 30/10/2011 10:33, Fred wrote:

It seems they often have enough to suck the people in, but not enough to actually be useful!

They are especially good for cutting tiles that are already stuck to a wall. There are much better ways of cutting tiles prior to fitting.
So jobs like freeing broken tiles, or cutting out sections for electrical boxes, or shower valves etc they are ideal for.

Yup
Yes, and yes.

Several. I find they work far more effectively than the traditional delta sanders. The paper seems to last longer. The nature of the oscillating action and the curve of the sander head means you can sand right up to an obstruction or edge without it hammering or vibrating against it.

Its a job I use mine for frequently. With a plunge cut blade, its easy to make a cut with very fine kerf and a bevel on the edge. So you can make cuts where it is easy to hide the cut later by sliding the board up a mm. Using a bevel means that with care you can do cuts not over a joist and still have a way of making a strong repair later without needing too much in the way of elaborate support under the board.

There is a corder blue bosch as well now. Also if you only want specific tools, then you can have a bare Fein multimaster for less than the cost of the Bosch kits.

The difficult part of these questions to answer is that most folks who have one or other of the tools don't have much or any experience with other brands. This can make comparisons rather tricky. Reports seem to suggest that the rigidity and vibration control improves as you go more up market, but most of them can achieve much the same basic functionality. Some of the lower end ones have more restrictive blade positioning options - allowing straight up, and 90 degrees left and right, but not the more handy in between angles.

These tools don't really need that much power in the sense of output cutting power, so its unlikely to make much difference. The cordless ones however do tend to suffer from very short battery life.
I take it you have read:
http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php?title=Oscillating_tools
--
Cheers,

John.

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On Sun, 30 Oct 2011 15:09:59 +0000, John Rumm

Thanks, these were the kind of tasks I was thinking of, along with the floorboard cutting. I'll see if I can buy one next time round or if the Bosch ones go on sale at Christmas.
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On Sun, 30 Oct 2011 15:09:59 +0000, John Rumm

I've just found this page; according to the photo, the green Bosch has an input of 180W but an output of only 74W:
http://www.ultimatehandyman.co.uk/forum1/bosch-pmf-180-v-aldi-multitool-t49764.html
The reviewer claims the Aldi is more powerful because it is rated 300w but I don't think he has appreciated this is the input, rather than the output, power.
Fred.
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On 31/10/2011 19:17, Fred wrote:

http://www.ultimatehandyman.co.uk/forum1/bosch-pmf-180-v-aldi-multitool-t49764.html
Indeed - mechanical output powers are rarely stated, and are typically quite a bit down on the electrical input (much of which will be lost as heat, and vibration etc).
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John.

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One last question, looking at the blades available for the Bosch, such as from Axminster's web site, what is the difference between a Japanese plunge cut blade and the "non-Japanese" plunge cut blade? Is it made from a harder type or metal or is the angle of the blade different or something else all together?
TIA Fred
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On 01/11/2011 19:05, Fred wrote:

Probably down to the tooth profile. Japanese wood saws typically have a different tooth profile to what we think of as a normal wood saw (aside from cutting on the pull rather than the push stroke). The HSS/bimetal ones are designed for plastics and non ferrous metals as well as wood, and are different again.
Japanese profile teeth:
http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php?title=File:Mm-wood-plunge-coarse.jpg
Traditional profile:
http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php?title=File:Mm-wideblade.jpg
--
Cheers,

John.

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Do you have a link to a picture of this tool?
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wrote:

I don't know how long the Aldi page will remain for but it is: http://www.aldi.co.uk/uk/html/offers/special_buys3_21213.htm
The Bosches, blue and green, can be found here (and at any other good seller): http://www.axminster.co.uk/bosch-allrounder-dept828380_pg1 /
HTH, Fred
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