multipurpose tools: Bosch and Aldi

Hi,
I saw that Aldi were offering a multitool for 30 but I was working Thursday morning and by the time I got there after work, they had all gone. I didn't realise there were so many keen DIYers around here ;)
I visited a couple of nearby Aldis but it was story: they had all been sold.
I have not used one of these tools before. I understand they are especially good for cutting tiles and grout. Perhaps to remove grout around a damaged tile to replace that tile whilst leaving the rest of the wall intact.
I think they are supposed to be good for cutting things in situ, perhaps to fit a switch or socket in a plasterboard wall.
Are these the kind of jobs you have used them for, and did they do well?
I am not so sure that they would be useful for sanding. What advantage do they have if you already have a delta sander?
I was interested in getting one for cutting floorboards over joists. In the past I have used a hand floorboard saw or tried to plunge cut with a reciprocating saw. I was hoping the multitool might be more controllable (I find the reciprocating saw can sometimes bounce but perhaps that is due to the blade or operator's technique not being quite optimal?) What do you think?
I think there are three models to choose from: Aldi, green bosch, and blue bosch. The blue bosch is cordless but for occasional use, I am not sure it would be worth it for me. The green bosch is cheaper, which might be a nice compromise for occasional DIY use, like mine. But OTOH, the green bosch costs twice that of the Aldi. Is it twice as good, or are you just paying for the name on the side? Should I wait until Aldi or Lidl sell them again next year or buy a Bosch before then?
I think the blue bosch is more powerful but are all other models more or less the same?
TIA, Fred
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I do have one - the original Fein - but a proper wet tile cutter is the thing for tiles. For cutting floorboards across a joist I use a jigsaw with cut down blade. The Multi-master takes ages to do the same thing.
It does have its uses, but I managed pretty well for ages without one.
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On Sun, 30 Oct 2011 11:04:48 +0000 (GMT), Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

That's what I do as well.

If I could have got the Aldi for 30 I probably would have. On the other hand I'm not going to splash out on one for 60 plus unless I know I have a real need for it.
30 is not too expensive on the basis that people rave about 'em and it's the sort of tool that makes jobs that are awkward with conventional tools a lot easier or gives a better result.
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On Sun, 30 Oct 2011 13:04:50 +0000 (GMT), "Dave Liquorice"

Ok, I'll wait until they sell them next year. Like you, I will probably only use it once in a while. I've managed without one up to now, so a few more months without one won't hurt ;)
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On Sun, 30 Oct 2011 11:04:48 +0000 (GMT), "Dave Plowman (News)"

Do you mean diamond disc in a water bath type of tile cutter? I agree they are best for cutting tiles before you fit them but I was thinking about cutting tiles once they had been on the wall some time and firmly glued on.

Do you plunge cut the blade in and then slide it across? It's a good idea to trim the blade to size; that would prevent you cutting the joist, if you know the floorboard depth before you begin. I think my boards are about 17mm, so that would only be a tiny blade, or are you running it across some sort of guide?
TIA, Fred
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A pretty limited application I'd think, but should be ok for that. Difficult to make a nice clean cut, though. If they are strong tiles, or if I had spares, I'd remove them and cut them on the wet cutter. of course if the edge is concealed, other methods could be fine.

Fit a spare blade and pull it down to the lowest part of the stroke. Then offer up against a floorboard and mark the maximum depth. Then snap off the excess part of the blade. You can then do a plunge cut by pivoting the jigsaw - most have a rounded edge to the bed to allow this. Take it slowly, and you can start in the middle of the board. Cut to the edge, then turn round and go to the other edge. It's very quick once you get the hang of it - but obviously avoid any nails. If you do, a blade will last a long time. The multi-master blade I have is a very fine toothed one and takes forever to do the same job.
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wrote:

Buy the right blade. You have the right tool. Forget the wrong tool.
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In fact, what blade takes forever?
I have used both Japanese types, the tct metal/wood ones and the hss (semi) circular types, and I don't think any of them would take more than 30 secs to do a 6-7 inch floorboard. Given the massive kerf size advantage (replace leaving an ugly gash, or a barely noticeable slit, as it were) it's worth any (dubious) time advantage.
Are you trying to use the scraper blade?
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In article

Think you should *actually* try cutting a floorboard. With the semi circular wood type. I'll supply the stopwatch. For the floorboards on this london Victorian house the kerf of a jigsaw blade is only about the same as the gap between the boards anyway. ;-) If they were tongue and groove I'd be more concerned.
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wrote:

They are the slowest cutting. I have used them to cut floorboards (se london victorian house, likely quite similar floorboards) a few times, but would use a precision jap wide blade or one of the tct ones out of choice (ie unless I've run out of ones with teeth). I'll time one next weekend out of interest if I remember, but unless my memory is very faulty I still reckon 30 seconds is about right with the semi- circular hss and quicker with the others.

I guess it depends whether they are exposed or not, if they are then odd short boards look a bit pants and the thin kerf goes a long way to hiding them.
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In article

Right. How much are these blades? I'd guess most who buy a multi-tool already have a jigsaw, and blades for that ain't expensive. There's always the risk of hitting a nail when doing this sort of job on an old house.

I wasn't considering exposed boards. Just the sort of floor covered by carpets, etc. A decent exposed floor would require a different technique.
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On 30/10/2011 23:51, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

I find the circular or semi circular blades are much slower for this sort of cut than the narrow plunge blades.
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John.

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Perhaps I need to experiment more. I did try cutting a floorboard with the Fein because it was to hand - using the supplied tools. A semi-circular saw or a square edged one - which looked like it was for metal. Progress was so slow I got the jigsaw.
I didn't look for alternative blades as my reasoning says a jigsaw will always be faster. Perhaps my reasoning is wrong.
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On 31/10/2011 14:05, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

A jigsaw may well be a bit faster, but if you only need a handful of boards cut then the added precision and reduced damage of the multimaster makes it worth the extra few seconds IMHO.
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John.

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On Mon, 31 Oct 2011 11:10:27 +0000, John Rumm

Something like this? http://www.axminster.co.uk/bosch-bosch-hcs-plunge-cut-blades-prod794496 /
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On 31/10/2011 19:13, Fred wrote:

Yup, the 32mm wide one... (or possibly even the 75mm one - not tried one of those for a floorboard yet)
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John.

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In article

It's not going to be as fast as a jigsaw regardless of the blade, though.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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wrote:

Seen contract central heating guys use a circular saw on stripped and varnished floorboards..
Floorboard cutting was very application had in mind for aldi multitool :-)
Cheers Adam

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On Sun, 30 Oct 2011 10:33:40 +0000, Fred wrote:

Axminster has offers atm on the blue Bosch and as a kit:
http://www.axminster.co.uk/bosch-bosch-gop-250-ce-multi-cutter-prod833182/?utm_medium=email&utm_source=axminster%20power&utm_campaign=emailclub_11wk41b&utm_content=gopimg
http://www.axminster.co.uk/bosch-bosch-gop-250-ce-multi-cutter-with-49-accessories-and-l-boxx-prod836712 /
I just might get the latter, having failed at Aldi (and again with the recip. saw)
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Aldi seems infamous for having poor stocks of this sort of thing. Lidl - or rather my local ones - usually have plenty. Although once not.
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