ISE washing machines

On Mon, 24 Nov 2008 00:33:41 GMT, "BigWallop"

That's a start, I've got one of those...somewhere...
Regards,
--
Stephen Howard
Woodwind repairs & period restorations
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BigWallop wrote:

That job's worse than it looks. the writer got lucky with the inner bearing, IME the bearing had to be painstakingly ground right through using a tiny die grinder. I also found that altho a bar is helpful, its not enough on its own. I made one of these: http://www.wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php?title=Bearing_puller

Have you done hotpoint bearings using one of those? I couldnt get one anywhere that would do the job.
NT
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On Mon, 24 Nov 2008 04:07:35 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

That's handy! Ta.
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Steve ( out in the sticks )
Email: Take time to reply: timefrom_usenetgmx.net
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Interesting to see that those instructions match my 22 year old Hotpoint. You only need to replace the drum spider and shaft assembly if the bearing has rusted on to the shaft. Otherwise you only need to replace the bearing and bearing seal (and I've only ever seen the inner bearing fail, so you usually don't need to bust a gut trying to get the smaller outer bearing out). It didn't take me anything like 6 hours, even first time. Subsequent replacements took about an hour or just over. BTW, it was about 18 years before the first bearing failed.
Problem I've got now is that the inner bearing seased at some point and the whole bearing assembly started turning in the drum bearing sleave, which means it's worn too big, wobbles even when you fit a brand new bearing, and consequently leaks enough water past the bearing seal to rust it in a year. That needs a new drum, which at around the £100 mark for a 22 year old machine, seems like a step too far. Bearings are dirt cheap (under a fiver), so I've kept it going by replacing them once a year, but the wear on the bearing sleeve is now too much. Just waiting for the VAT rate to go down and the Sales before I pension off my much loved 22 year old washer.
I've heard that a number of new machines no longer have replacable bearings. You have to replace the whole outer drum. Anyone know which ones these are (to avoid them)?
--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
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^                          seized
You're welcome.
--
"I have never been able to conceive how any rational being could propose
happiness to himself from the exercise of power over others." - Thomas Jefferson
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My original attempt was ceased.
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Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
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On 24 Nov 2008 09:12:52 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:

That's encouraging, thanks!

That's what I need to find out - I have a nasty feeling.
http://www.ukwhitegoods.co.uk/modules.php?name=Content&pa=showpage&pid 5
or http://tinyurl.com/y593zc
Regards,
--
Steve ( out in the sticks )
Email: Take time to reply: timefrom_usenetgmx.net
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On Mon, 24 Nov 2008 00:09:14 +0000, Stephen Howard

Meh, I think somewhere on said UK Whitegoods forum is the tale of the 1 year old Zanussi I rescued from landfill (via Freecycle).
One drum bearing had gone and the whole machine was replaced by their insurance company because to replace the bearing was uneconomically viable.
That machine *had* a one piece plastic outer tub, till I got the saber saw on it that is and it was put back together with a little help from my friends here (re adhesives, rubber extrusions, ideas etc). ;-)
Cheers, T i m
p.s. As mentioned somewhere on this thread the plastic tub was marked with 1100 rpm when the max speed of the machine is 1400? We only run it at 900 rpm to stay on the safe side.
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Whatever the machine claims to do, it's wise never to run the machine at the highest speed available.
With nine kids we've only had three washing machines in over thirty years.
No. 1: Hoover. Cheap model. One repair (bearings). By the time it died again, it really was done. Put into store for potential spares.
No. 2: Old model Zanussi. Cold water solenoid eventually failed. DIY repair using hot water solenoid from old Hoover. Bearings failed. Bought machine No. 3 but replaced bearings (DIY with some difficulty) so machine is working and spare.
No. 3: Miele. No repairs yet.
Not bad for machines which are on virtually all day.
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Nine kids? I think you'd have been better off buying a TV. :o)
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happiness to himself from the exercise of power over others." - Thomas Jefferson
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What -- and miss out on all the fun ? :-)
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Stephen Howard wrote:

So folks, do we want washing machines to last 30 years? Of course it seems an appealing idea, but...
Say that ended up making the purchase price 1000 pounds. (And let us ignore inflation and interest and boring things like that.)
After 10 years, it might look a bit tatty, but should have 666 pounds of life left in it.
After 20 years, it will almost certainly look tatty, but should have 333 pounds of life left in it.
Whatever model you buy, you are pretty much stuck with it for a very long time. Whether they bring out massively improved spin speeds, reduced hot water usage, low temperature programs or anything else, you will not be in a position to catch up. (So you had better go for the top of the range when you buy, just in case...)
Whatever might go wrong in the first 25 years, you are pretty much forced to pay out for a repair because replacement wouldn't be a viable option. You are therefore reliant on parts availability - which is difficult to ensure over very long periods.
Whatever tattiness it exhibits, you have to put up with (or put a lot of effort into tarting up).
Whatever maintenance such as cleaning filters, soap drawers, and such like, you are forced to perform. (There is no way you will dodge it for 30 years. Unfortuantely.)
Perhaps there is some optimum that might not be so very far from current w/m lives (at least, for the better ones).
By the way, many years ago, life for a w/m averaged something like 8-10 years and the most common coffin nail was rust. Anyone happen to know corresponding life and terminal condition for today's w/ms?
--
Rod

Hypothyroidism is a seriously debilitating condition with an insidious
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But. If the machine was built to last 30 years, it wouldn't look tatty at any time through its proposed life span. It should be built to last 30 years, not built to the same standard as they are now and might last thirty years. The quality of the machine would have to be high enough to make the body of the machine last the length of time expected.
You might get bored looking at the same machine for 30 years, but a few magnets would cure that. :-)
)sorry about replying at the top of the post, but it takes to long to scroll down(

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BigWallop wrote:

A stainless steel front wold address this. And cost more.
NT
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Historically, American machines averaged around 20 years. However since they're generally kept in the basement which in most instances will have bare concrete/concrete block/stone walls, the appeareance isn't generally an issue.
How poorly they washed is another issue entirely, of course. And the undies and the dishtowels tend to be washed together in cold or warm water :-(. No wonder they have to add bleach :-)
The current generation of American machines are a lot less solidly built and durability seems to be dropping rapidly.
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