Is tooth brushing water from hot tap safer than from cold tap?

In another thread we are currently discussing if it was safe make a cup of coffee from water which had been taken from the hot water tap (US: faucet) and boiled for a brief period in an automatic kitchen kettle.
See "Safe to drink boiled water from hot tap?" Google groups = http://tinyurl.com/oqdya direct = <
However what about brushing your teeth? Most people would brush their teeth using water from the cold tap in the bathroom.
Maybe, jus maybe, water from the hot tap in the bathroom is safer than from the cold? The following post in the original thread started off my line of thinking:
On 05 May 2006, Dave Plowman wrote in the original thread:

My own hot water tank is in the roofspace and it gets a feed from the rising water main to the house and the tank has a tight fitting cover.
However the cold water tank in my roofspace is much older and had a damaged top and I can see the base of the tank is full of crud.
It seems that I am nrushing my teeth using water from the worse one !!!
This must be true in millions of households. Many have a heating system like mine with hot & cold tanks in their roofspace plus a hot water cylinder. . And maybe they too have their cold water in the bathroom supplied from their tank in the roofspace.
In an old house the heating system is quite likely to be much newer (say five to 10 years) that the cold water system (say 30 to 40 years).
In future, should I use the hot water tap (before the water runs too hot!) to brush my teeth?
Thanks for any feedback Ravid
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|In another thread we are currently discussing if it was safe make a cup |of coffee from water which had been taken from the hot water tap (US: |faucet) and boiled for a brief period in an automatic kitchen kettle. | | |See "Safe to drink boiled water from hot tap?" |Google groups = http://tinyurl.com/oqdya |direct = < | | |However what about brushing your teeth? Most people would brush their |teeth using water from the cold tap in the bathroom. | |Maybe, jus maybe, water from the hot tap in the bathroom is safer than |from the cold? The following post in the original thread started off |my line of thinking: | |On 05 May 2006, Dave Plowman wrote in the original thread: |> |> ... but do you really want to drink water that has |> been held nice and warm with a selection of dead spiders, flies, |> bats, rodents and other loft inhabitants in it? |> |> how often do people have to be told the tank should have an |> approved cover and venting to prevent this? |> |> It's not just drinking the stuff. If you shower or have a bath, |> there's a good chance you'll get some of that water in your mouth |> and eyes, etc. So it should be to a decent standard - not from the |> graveyard of assorted species through your neglect. | | |My own hot water tank is in the roofspace and it gets a feed from the |rising water main to the house and the tank has a tight fitting cover. | |However the cold water tank in my roofspace is much older and had a |damaged top and I can see the base of the tank is full of crud. | |It seems that I am nrushing my teeth using water from the worse one !!! | |This must be true in millions of households. Many have a heating system |like mine with hot & cold tanks in their roofspace plus a hot water |cylinder. . And maybe they too have their cold water in the bathroom |supplied from their tank in the roofspace. | |In an old house the heating system is quite likely to be much newer (say |five to 10 years) that the cold water system (say 30 to 40 years). | |In future, should I use the hot water tap (before the water runs too |hot!) to brush my teeth?
Stop worrying, the risks either way are minimal. One does not drink a lot of water when brushing your teeth.
If you want to avoid all risk stay in bed, which incidentally is more risky than getting up.
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I've never seen an installation in a house with separate header tanks for hot and cold.
The bathroom basin should be really be fed with mains cold water, though. Baths and showers off the header tank to get adequate flow.
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*Just give me chocolate and nobody gets hurt

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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No, you safer using cold water for drinking and cooking.
Hot water contains more lead because the water sits around more and lead enters hot water faster.
Besides, why would you risk burns with hot water when cold is right there?
Jeff
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Jeff wrote:

That's why you have to ear a tinfoil hat when making soup.
What lead?
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Er, you have missed a couple of things. The water from the hot water tap is not so hot as to burn.
The cold water tap, as I said, is from a tank.
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A wooden tank.
And for the hot water, it is never a good idea to get used to using it to brush teeth. You don't want to get in the habit of using hot water to brush teeth, because other places (.e.g, a friend's house) might have hotter hot water.
Jeff
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David P wrote:

Legionella is endemic in all water supplies at below 60C, (HSE Leaflet)
Legionella thrives (grows) at between 20C & 50C (HSE L8 Code of Practice)
Do a google search on Legionella and then see if you want to clean your teeth in water that has stood around for some time.
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And yet that is exactly what I have got in the bathroom.
To repeat: the hot water tap is fed by a tank in the roofspace the cold water tap is fed by a tank in the roofspace
There is no mains water at all in the bathroom. Neither in the cold tap for the basin nor in the cold tap for the bath.
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David P wrote:

That's what I've got. I'd guess that somewhere approaching half of all houses have similar. What's the problem? There isn't one.
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This is most unusual. Is the house very old?

The bath is normally fed with 22mm pipe to give a fast flow rate from the header tank, and unless you like cold baths there is no point in having it on the mains, given you're as likely to 'drink' some of the hot as the cold when bathing.
The basin is different. Many like to have a drink of water after teeth cleaning or whatever. Have you investigated changing it to mains? All the pipework going to the loft may well be together and of course includes mains. So may not be that difficult to pick up.
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*Procrastination is the art of keeping up with yesterday.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Sat, 06 May 2006 22:14:12 +0100 someone who may be David P

Are they both the same size?
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David Hansen, Edinburgh
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David Hansen wrote:

I think you're thinking what I'm thinking...
Owain
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Gives your immune system a good workout!.....
--
Tony Sayer


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tony sayer wrote:

Back in 1997, before I went to the Baltics, I drank increasing amounts of cold-tank water for a few weeks. The tank was in a cupboard, not the roof so not very smelly.
My theory was, a few bugs would be a good thing. Don;t know how if it made any difference, but I was drinking small amounts of water from soviet plumbing and directly from countryside wells with no ill effect.
The woolly asbestos (probably) I found while nosing in a riser cupboard gave me more of a start!
Tim
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David P wrote:

Use caustic soda for excellent results.
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Weatherlawyer wrote:

Some toothpaste (e.g. Maclean's Whitening, which I have some of in the cupboard) does contain caustic soda.
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On Sat, 6 May 2006, Chris Bacon wrote:

I think those have got sodium bicarbonate; caustic soda is sodium hydroxide, which is altogether different. Caustic soda would be a very effective tooth-cleaning agent; the problem is that it would also be a rather effective flesh-dissolving agent as well.
tom
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Tom Anderson wrote:

Yes, I know. Let me get the tube for you:
"Macleans whitening helps restore natural whiteness and keep teeth healthy. Ingredients: Aqua, hydrated silica, sorbitol, pentasodium triphosphate, PEG-6 (?), titanium dioxide, sodium lauryl sulphate (my sp.), aroma, xanthum gum, sodium hydroxide, soduim saccharin, sodium fluoride, limonene."

It only mentions keeping teeth healthy, not gums wuggf umnumnum blblbblb mmfff.
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Polyethylene glycol. The 6 tells you how long the chain is.
PEG is used in a number of toothpastes as a dispersant; it binds water and helps keep gum uniform throughout the toothpaste. It is also used in liquid body armor [3] and tattoos to monitor diabetes[4]. Functional groups of PEG give polyurethane elastomers their "rubberiness", for applications such as foams (foam rubber) and fibers (spandex). Its backbone structure is analogous to that of silicone, another elastomer.
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