Flipping over turf



The grass may well be annoyed at having to start again. It wants to be making seeds.
--
The fact that a believer is happier than a skeptic is no more to the point than the fact that a drunken man is happier than a sober one -- George Bernard Shaw

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On 19/04/2017 13:50, Max Demian wrote:

Cutting lawns stimulates grass growth:
Does mowing the lawn promote grass growth? | Yahoo Answers https://answers.yahoo.com/question/?qid 060725092618AAeBR4G seems like my lawn is filling in the bare spots and I have not planted seed. ... Yes mowing the grass will stimulate growth. Not only will it spread seeds but it also ...
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Yes, it doesn't take *that* long either, maybe 12 months to be acceptable and a couple of years to look really good. I remember we did this at my parents' house many years ago (1950s/1960s), it used to be mowed (mostly by me) with a Suffolk Punch mower. I guess the rolling action of the mower helped too.
--
Chris Green
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On 18/04/2017 00:29, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

"The lawn was one of those tended according to the old British formula: Seed and roll for 500 years"
(Ringworld, Larry Niven, 1972.)
Andy
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On Monday, 17 April 2017 20:35:29 UTC+1, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The grass is totally weed-free, but it has a mix of varieties -giving inconsistent colour and texture. Currently it gets mowed every two days.
One of the coarser varieties tends to spread out horizontally so, in my view, is an undesirable. But all that aside I want to get closer to getting a much better lawn - lawn that makes a real impression - level, smooth, consistent , rich green etc etc
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One trick I've seen for that is, let it grow a bit more, and that course grass tends to be higher. Use a glyphosate glove to sweep across just making contact with this higher grass. That will eliminate it. You can (or could) buy glyphosate gloves, but you can probably make one with a disposable plastic glove to keep it off your skin.
Of course, depends on the extent of it.
--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
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Birds don't eat grass seed, it's got a bad flavour added to it.
--
I spent a couple of hours defrosting the fridge last night, or "foreplay" as she likes to call it.

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Bazza wrote:

You think that you have problems? I'm having a battle to the death with the bloody Dandelions in my front garden.
Mr Hogg will be along eventually to help you. Take note of what he says.
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On Mon, 17 Apr 2017 20:23:04 +0100, "Mr Pounder Esquire"

You want a selective lawn weedkiller like Verdone, that you spray onto the individual dandelion plants, as here http://tinyurl.com/kza63qs but not necessarily from Amazon. Your local garden centre will almost certainly have it. Only takes a few minutes to walk across the grass and treat each weed, which will then turn up its leaves and die in a couple of weeks.
--

Chris

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Chris Hogg wrote:

I poke a hole into the "heart" of the swines and pour salt into the hole. This kills them, but they come back in different places. All the gardens near me seem to have the same infestation. Something to do with the mild winter.
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On Mon, 17 Apr 2017 21:18:12 +0100, "Mr Pounder Esquire"

Your grass probably has a lot of dandelion seeds in it, and these are germinating. Salt will kill them, but it may also kill the grass in that immediate area and poison the soil until it all washes through, so you can end up with little bald patches all over it. Go for Verdone, and make sure you pick off any dandelion flower heads before they make 'clocks'.
--

Chris

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Chris Hogg wrote:

Okay and thanks Sir. This is the first year that I've had this problem. I was probably going over the top with my Dandelion problem. I've encountered about four of them, four too many! Mrs Pounder Esq is not too happy with the front lawn. The fact that it has only had the second mow of the year falls on deaf ears.
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wrote:

Yeah, we got that at the start of our summer after the wettest 5 months we had ever seen and a very mild winter.
Didn’t last long, only a few weeks and they were all gone without any action at all.
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On 18/04/2017 00:47, Rod Speed wrote:

> Agreed. We just cut our lawns regularly and the Dandelions disappear without faffing about with chemicals etc. Our lawns look as good as any other lawn that do not have any Dandelions. I personally think that Dandelions look nice, adds a bit of colour to a lawn anyway. Such a silly little thing to worry about.
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On 4/17/2017 9:10 PM, Chris Hogg wrote:

Verdone is not what it used to be when I was a lad.....
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On 17/04/2017 20:23, Mr Pounder Esquire wrote:

It might be doable if you have a lawn roller, but you will need to kill the old grass first or it will regrow from the inverted turf. I compost stack the pieces of turf I cut up and the top of the stack goes grassy.

Simple solution is a 12" screwdriver down the side of the tap root and a gentle levering action. It makes a satisfying noise as the root breaks and the trick is to pull as long a piece as you can get. Might take a couple of goes for a big established one with a deep root.
Failing that hit them with Verdone spot weeding or if they still do it a gel wand formulation. I only persecute dandelions and buttercup in my lawns - modest amount of other wildflowers are welcomed.
--
Regards,
Martin Brown
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wrote:

Never tried it, but it's quite common to invert grass turves and cover them with a *thick* layer of topsoil to make flowerbeds. But in your case I would be concerned about a couple of things. First, if only buried a couple of inches the old grass may well grow back through. If you're re-doing it because it's full of coarse grass and weeds, things may not be better in the medium term. Second, in making a lawn you need to heel-tread the soil several times in different directions to compact the soil, raking it level to even out high and low areas between passes. This has to be done before sowing the seed, otherwise you end up with a very soft spongy lawn that'll show depressions as you walk on it. This will particularly be the case as the grass in the inverted turves rots away. On the plus side, the rotted turves will provide a good medium for the new grass to root into.
I think if it were mine, I'd first just consider re-seeding into the existing grass. If what's there is really too poor for that, I'd kill it all down with glyphosate, wait a few weeks for it to die and rot, then hire a rotovator and go over it to break it all up, or simply fork it over it by hand if you're young and fit. Then roughly level it and do the heel-walking/levelling routine before finally sowing the seed. Keep the young grass watered through the summer, as the plantlets won't have developed extensive roots and may die if we get a dry spell.
Ask on uk.rec.gardening and you may get a response from someone who's got more experience, with the pitfalls.
--

Chris

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On 17/04/2017 20:59, Chris Hogg wrote:

Do you really need to compact it that much or will running my plate compactor over it be enough if I wanted to redo my lawn?
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On Mon, 17 Apr 2017 22:07:11 +0100, dennis@home

I would guess it'd be ok, but try it and see. If after the compactor treatment, it's still soft to walk on and you leave impressions of your feet, then you need to heel-walk it.
--

Chris

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Got to be worth a try:-)
Many years ago, I was asked by some friends to spray off and rotavate an established lawn where they had built a house. The job looked easy enough although there were trees and borders.
Knapsack, spray bar and Glyphosate did for the grass and 2 weeks later I went back with a small tractor and mounted rotavator.
Big mistake! No matter how many times I went over the ground, it remained *fluffy* from all the fibrous roots chopped up and mixed with a little soil.
Ploughing works by parking the vegetation several inches below the new surface and, for the old grass/cereal rotation, Autumn ploughing and Spring planting.
Let the grass grow so you have plenty of target leaf, spray off. Mow/remove top cover when dead. Spread your soil, compact and level. Seed and lightly rake in. Discourage Cats and Foxes from excavating holes:-)

--
Tim Lamb

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