Fixing B&Q wall units

Gentleman, I have embarked on fixing my B&Q wall units and would appreciate advice from the experts that lurk on this group. The walls I am fixing the miniscule brackets on to are breeze block with plasterboard dabbed on top. In total there is a 25mm gap between the plasterboard and the breeze block. I have noticed when fixing several of the brackets with 3" x 10 screws, that due to the limited amount of dab plaster/muck that the board was floated on, the board is pulled very tightly into the breeze as there is nothing to stop it. This causes the plasterboard to totally distort. One of my work colleagues mentioned that the B&Q fixing system for the cabinets was prone to have the cabinets fall off on this type of wall. It has been suggested that I fix a 2"x 1" wooden batten along the length of the walls that the cabinets are going to be fitted on. Obviously I will have to cut out a long section of plasterboard. Before I continue with this route has anyone got any better ideas.
Comments much appreciated.
Steve
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appreciate
the
block.
that
on,
stop
long
I take a 1" SDS drill bit (in a SDS drill obviously) and drill 2" into the breeze block, then hammer a 2 and a bit inch long piece of 1" knurled dowelling (with the rippled edge) from B&Q deep into the hole until it is flush with the level I want to mount the cabinet at. Repeat at all screw locations. If the breeze block is crumbly when the dowel is hammered in then stuff some sand/cement mortar in as well but obviously with a deeper hole of less dowel.
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What you do is fix the cross member on the back of the unit to a strip of 2x1 batten.
Cut the batten about 1/4 to 1/2 inch short of the internal width and get it level. Another placed under the unit will support it. Use gripper and plasterboard screws. It's an half hour job. I can't understand why anyone uses anything else no matter what the wall is made of.
Rember to place them 3 tiles higher than the work top. And watch where the tiles are going to end.
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appreciate
the
top.
Not that I'm saying it's the best method, but I cut out a square of plasterboard ( with a stanley knife ) at the two attachment locations and screwed a square block of wood into each hole ( into plugs set into holes I drilled in the brick ). As long as the wood is at the same level as the plasterboard surface, you can now screw the unit into the wood blocks (having taken care to leave a sufficient area of wood to screw into, taking into account the screws holding the wood blocks to the wall).
Andy.
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fixing
I
taking
this is how I ended up doing ours - however I just used the wooden blocks as spacers to bring the metal plates for the brackets flush with the plasterboard. I did try screwing the plates to the brick wall behind the plasterboard but the plasterboard just gave way as I tightened the screws. (plasterboard goes up quicker but I cant help thinking proper plastered brick is so much more useful!)
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It's definitely the way I'd do it. Make the wooden battens vertical, as it would be stronger than horizontal battens or isolated pads.
To attach the wood to the blocks, use meaty screws (i.e. 6mm x 75mm) and brown plugs. Alternatively, use rawlbolts.
The other alternative is to cut back the plasterboard all around the wall units and mount the wall units directly onto the concrete block. Then patch the plaster. This leaves the units embedded in the wall somewhat.
Christian.
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