Kitchen cupboard fell off wall

I came across a kitchen wall cabinet that had nearly fallen off the wall.
It was in a fairly modern house - last 15 years I'd say
When I examined the wall it consisted of a layer of plasterboard and directly behind that was about 8cm of solid pink foam then breeze blocks. No gap or wooden studs.
The cupboard had been screwed to the plasterboard using metal plasterboard fittings - not surprised it came off - could have killed a child.
I sorted it using by drilling into the breeze blocks and putting 8mm studs in with resin but what's the approved type of fixing for this type of wall? Rigifix?
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On Thursday, 13 September 2018 21:36:28 UTC+1, Murmansk wrote:

you can get various aerated block fixings, resin certainly works. Spreading the load over several fixings helps too.
NT
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On Thursday, 13 September 2018 22:08:27 UTC+1, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I use the hanging rails and anchor bolts into brick. Won't come out of the wall without being chiselled out with the SDS.
Right bugger when I measured twice and both were wrong :-(
Owain
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On 13/09/18 21:36, Murmansk wrote:

TBH it will hold up IF the load is spread.
My solution wouuld have beein to rip a crate in te foom and remove te plasterboard locally. them slap in car body filler.
Car body filler is better than rawlplastic ever was. It takes screws perefectly and is sandable and paintable. And it sticks to almost everything except polythene
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On Friday, 14 September 2018 06:01:26 UTC+1, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

rip a crate in the foom?
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Some cupboards get fitted badly by fitting companies and often this is not helped by users putting very heavy loads in them often enough to bow the chipboard shelves or bottoms. Brian
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I have sworn by hollow wall anchors and have hung lots of heavy objects wit hout problems. The only time they failed on me was when I inadvertently use d some designed for 12mm max. PB in a 15mm board, this prevented the anchor opening out fully behind the board the result being the anchor pulled thro ugh the board as it was tightened. The OP does not specify what type of met al fixing was used but I can see how the foam might prevent several types f rom working or if they are hollow wall types are they correct for the thick ness of PB.
Richard
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Tricky Dicky wrote on 14/09/2018 :

I would be wary of hanging any heavy weight on PB, even if well fixed to the PB, you don't know how well fixed the PB might be. There is only one PB wall here, a recent wall between bathroom a second bedroom. At the construction stage, I made sure a pair of battens were added at a suitable height for the eventual bathroom cabinet.
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I prefer a rail with lots of fixings over the short plates that are commonly used. You may have to route a bit out of the rear of the sides - but so what.
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