Cutting a spur cable

I have a spur in my kitchen feeding one socket. The cable has developed a break and to save me a lot of hassle I was going to cut the cable before the break and simply move the wall socket.
In the meantime is it possible for me to cut the cable and tape over it till I do the job or does this break the circuit to the rest of the ring mains?
It will only be for a maximum of 48hrs
Thanks for any advice.
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"Jim Hollis" wrote:

Any idea what caused the break? In my experience it's very unusual for cables to break for no reason.

I don't quite understand what you mean by "tape over it". Could you give us more details about what you are proposing to do.
Assuming you are planning to turn off the power, cut the cable feeding the wall socket and then insulate the "hot" end of the cable - then that seems fine. Make sure you insulate each core of the cable separately though and use proper insulating tape.

Temporary fixes do have a habit of becoming permanent ones, so I would wait the 48 hours, if you have to, and then fix it properly.
Alterations (not repairs) in kitchens are covered by "Part P". So don't forget to get permission first - or Johnny two-cormorants will be round to see you.
John
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John White,
Electrical Contractor
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John
Thanks for the quick reply. The cable had a bend on it under the floorboard and I could actually see it sparking and it was right on the bend so I am assuming it has a break there.
It is spurred from a dbl wall socket which is about 4 or 5 feet up the wall so to replace the whole cable I would have to hack out a channel right down the wall.
It is used for a washing machine (the spur) and it goes along the wall about 6ft from the dbl socket so I thought I would cut the cable about 2ft back from the break and reposition the socket 4ft along the wall from the dbl socket. This saves me channeling right down the wall.
What does this mean.............?
Alterations (not repairs) in kitchens are covered by "Part P". So

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Sparking cables are bad news as they are a potential fire risk and need dealing with promptly - as in now.
Have you enough room and spare cable to cut out the damaged part and rejoin it with a 30A junction box. That would provide a permanent, safe repair without having to move the socket.

I see.

Right that makes sense, but I would try the junction box approach first if you can.

This is one of that nice Mr Prescott's ideas to make us all safe.
There has been a recent change to "Part P" of the Building Regulations (a quick Google will turn up loads on it so I won't go into details here).
Basically if you do electrical work in certain areas of your house you are supposed to either use a contractor who will "self certify", or get the work checked by a Building Control Officer from the council.
Your kitchen is such an area.
Repairing or replacing fittings and cable like-for-like does not need such permission. Moving a socket or putting in a new one does.
(This is my current understanding of the situation - but it does seem to change by the hour so I could be wrong.)
Of course a lot of people chose to ignore this.
John
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Electrical Contractor
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John the junction box is a great idea and would solve the lot and I am sure there is enough slack......cheers for that!
Thanks for the heads up on the regs!
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Jim Hollis wrote:

Could you not crimp[1] a new section of cable onto the old? Then you would only need to hack out a small section near the join.
[1] insulate each wire join, and sheath the whole joint in heatshrink. Crimped connections must be made with a decent ratchet crimping tool. You can't used screw connections if the joint will become inaccessible (i.e. you are plastering over it). Alternatively you could also solder the connections.

Part P of the building regs applies to alterations to circuits made in "special locations" (of which a kitchen is one). Moving a socket would be an alteration, but replacing the damaged section of cable could count as a repair and hence not come under part P[2].
[2] work that comes under part P (in theory[3]) needs to be either carried out by a "competent person" (i.e. one who has paid the required subs to one of the approved competent persons organisations like NICEIC or CORGI etc), or need to be notified to building control prior to carrying out the work (and a building notice fee paid), and made available to them for inspection when complete (or at some other stage specified by them)).
[3] most competent DIYers will obviously treat such edicts from Two Shags with contempt, exercise the ostrich algorithm, and carry on as usual!
--
Cheers,

John.

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John White wrote:

Right now, that will be the last of his problems. :-) Assuming he is still in office Friday afternoon :-))
Dave
Just hoping.
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Jim Hollis pretended :

A spur is not on the ring, it is an off shoot - therefore the easy and safe way would be to disconnect it at the point on the ring it is fed from. If it really is a spur, then a safe permanent repair would be to move the existing spurred socket to a new position so the damaged cable could be cut off. Alternatively you could install a new section of cable, leaving the socket where it is now.
If rather than it being a spur, it is part of the ring, then the only solution would be to install a new section of cable - or perhaps if there is enough slack, add a socket where the cable has been damaged.
The last option assumes a socket can be added in that location and still meet the regulations.
--

Regards,
Harry (M1BYT) (L)
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Harry
Thanks for the reply. It def is a spur and of course I can just remove it from the dbl wall socket I never even thought of that!
Thanks to both of you for the help and advice it`s appreciated.
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The other option is to just cut the cable where the break is and put in a junction box if it is accessible after the repair. or use crimp connectors if is won't be accessible.
Sparks...
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Obvious answer - yes, unless you want to leave the wires sticking out for people to touch. Your choice, it comes down to common sense.
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John wrote:

I think he was asking about the circuit being broken, not whether he should tape up the cables or not.
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On Tue, 2 May 2006 22:08:48 +0100, "Jim Hollis"

You haven't been clear exactly what cable you are cutting. If you mean you are cutting the single cable that only goes to the socket you are moving, then tape it up just to prevent anyone touching the live..
If you mean that you are cutting the ring main then you must be carefull about what is plugged into each of the wires formiong the broken circuit. By cutting it you have halved the current carrying capacity of the circuit. As you probably won't have a clue how many sockets are on what wire, and what is plugged into them, only have one heavy power device plugged in and working at any one time in the house.
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