Crimped ferrules (?) on ends of 13A cables

See
http://www.littletyke.myzen.co.uk/crimped_ferrules.jpg
What is the correct name for them and where do I find them? I've googled and amazoned, but there are so many different kinds I can't see the wood for the trees.
I've always tinned the wire strands to (a) make it easier to fit them into the screwed holder and (b) stop the strands from splaying when tightening the screw.
The above cable is off an old Woolworths extension lead.
MM
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"MM" wrote in message

"Bootlace Ferrules"
I prefer the ones that have a short plastic sleeve incorporated to act as funnel and ensure no free strands escape.
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Cable-Cord-End-Terminals-Single-Entry-Bootlace-Ferrules-0-25mm-16mm-/160882425181?var=&hash=item257556fd5d:m:mJapzTg_QmkQY_IAVL7gTuA
or the uninsulated ones:
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/100x-Uninsulated-Bootlace-Cord-End-Ferrule-Terminals-Crimps-Cable-0-5mm-16mm-/262431672828?var=&hash=item3d1a2589fc:m:mjFaCo1wJnDvci_ZNiYGz2A
Andrew
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On Thu, 2 Jun 2016 08:51:38 +0100, "Andrew Mawson"

Those are nothing like the ones on the ends of the piece of cable I removed from the extension block. The ones shown in my pic are very short. Only about 7mm long.

They also appear to be much longer than on the cables in my pic. (Maybe the short kind in my pic are no longer available/used; Woolworths has been defunct in Britain for several years now.)
MM
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MM wrote:

uninsulated bootlace ferrules

rs, cpc, farnell, rapid etc

Not a good idea as the solder is soft and creeps under the pressure of the screw terminal, loosening over time.
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On Thursday, 2 June 2016 08:52:35 UTC+1, Andy Burns wrote:

+1
NT
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On 02/06/16 08:52, Andy Burns wrote:

Then you didn't tighten it enough to start with.
Think of the solder as a mastic to fill the gaps between the copper, but the copper makes the joint
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The Natural Philosopher wrote:

+1
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The other reason not to tin is it provides a fatigue point at the exit from the solder lump. That's not much of a problem in household wiring, but it is in something that sees vibration - like a power tool or a car.
Theo
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On Thu, 02 Jun 2016 11:58:42 +0100, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

A couple of years ago I was at Cosford Air Museum. They had just taken delivery of a Nimrod, and had removed the wings to transport it. It was plonked outside one of the hangers.
The removed wings exposed the spaghetti of wiring - all cut. It was heartbreaking in a way.
Hundreds of wires - all white. I presume that was some part of making it difficult to easily reverse engineer.
It was interesting to think that at sometime someone would have known what each wire did, and where it went.
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Jethro_uk wrote:

Each end of the wire would have been numbered. normal practice is only one colour of wire for a given current/voltage rating.
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It's never permitted to do this because the solder creeps over time under pressure and contact pressure is lost, causing the connection to then overheat.
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Andrew Gabriel
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On 03/06/16 20:56, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

You dont listen or think, do you?
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I corrected your misinformation, particularly as it is well known to be dangerous. I see lots of people have done that too.
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Andrew Gabriel
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On 04/06/16 12:28, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

No, you simply went along with misguided thinking that was wrong, and dangerous, and didn't listen to or even try and understand the arguments as to why it was misguided.
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I'd ask those who tin the ends of the leads what current they are taking from the circuit?
It's often thin wires which would be easier to fit if tinned. So if only a couple of amps at peak, less likely to give trouble regardless.
What would happen at the maximum continuous rating - ie 13 amps - would be interesting. Even some factory fit moulded plugs will get warm or even hot at full load.
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On Sat, 04 Jun 2016 13:41:49 +0100, "Dave Plowman (News)"

I'd agree that it would be more typical that *I* would generally tin (and fold and tin) finer wires, simply to hold them together and have a better chance for the screw to have something to bite down on than I might on heaver / less stranded wire.

I think if properly tinned (eg, not 'over ' soldered) and tightened correctly / sufficiently then nothing.

They can indeed and here is one I saw earlier. ;-
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/5772409/13A%20plug.jpg
Mate had his compressor plugged into a rubber trailing socket that was previously wired directly into the previous (higher power) compressor.
The fuse had gone a couple of times recently so because it was connected to it's own MCB someone though a solution would be some silver foil round the fuse. ;-(
I think a combination of a poor quality moulded plug (in comparison with an MK one) and plugged into a rubber trailing socket (even a branded one) allowed localised heating and potentially further stress on the fuse.
To help them isolate the fault, I checked it wasn't seized, that the caps were ok and after replacing the plug, that the motor ran ok on it's own. I then connected it back up and let it run up to full pressure and the plug was still cold (probably helped by being plugged into a decent Metalclad socket).
I've suggested they get the plug replaced with a decent (MK) one and a decent Metalclad socket fitted to the wall beside the compressor.
Cheers, T i m
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Yes very few 13A plugs can handle 13A continuously. A good manufacturer checks the performance, but even then they are at the mercy of the contact resistance in the socket.
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Resulting in this:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/fjc3xol5eyy6f06/DSC00015.JPG?dl=0
https://www.dropbox.com/s/3lcfzoe1lb683wz/DSC00018.JPG?dl=0
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On 09:57 2 Jun 2016, Mike Tomlinson wrote:

Gulp!
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Actually, I would say it's a very clear illustration of how the solder has crept under the neutral and earth screws.
Another problem with soldering tails is that it makes it very easy to pinch them off by tightening the screw too much. Think of how easy it is to pinch a bit of solder off a reel with your thumbnail. Now try doing that with stripped copper wire.
I used to tin my wire tails; I don't any more. If it's possible to strip a longer length of insulation back, double the stripped end over and insert that in the plug terminal, I do that instead.
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