Any locksmiths hereabouts? How to impress a padlock. Help please

Hello.
I have an old Chubb 'Cruiser' padlock, probably about 30 years old.
Still available
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the keys have been mislaid/lost and I would dearly like to use
it again rather than bin it and buy anew. FWIW the padlock is unlocked.
I have spoken with Chubb (unhelpful) who directed me to a local
supplier/agent. The local agent was Very helpful but unable to assist. He
said that if I could find a good locksmith it might be possible to obtain an
impression of the levers and thus produce a key.
This may perhaps not be worth the salt but I really detest chucking a
quality item away if it can possibly be retrieved.
Thanks
Nick
Reply to
Nick
I've done keys for doorlocks but I dont see how you would for a padlock, as theres no access to the necessary parts - short of destroying it.
There are ways to pick lcoks but afaik none will give you the key details.
NT
Reply to
meow2222
I've made keys up for various locks using a suitable blank and some black wax. Simply heat the blank key blade and coat it with a thin layer of black wax. Insert it gently and carefully into the lock then gently turn it in the appropriate direction. It will stop, of course - at which point you turn it back and carefully remove it. You'll see a mark in the wax...cut or file it out. Recoat the blade with wax and repeat.
It takes a while, and the impressions can sometimes be a bit of a puzzle to figure out ( is it a slot, or a groove? ), but the job satisfaction quota is brilliant. If you succeed...get a spare cut straightaway!
Regards,
Reply to
Stephen Howard
Then replace it with something like an Abus Discus, because an old Chubb Cruiser can be removed in mere seconds.
Reply to
Andy Dingley
"Impressioning" is the term for a web search. You can use simple soot too.
If this is a relatiely recent Cruiser, then you might have trouble obtaining a blank, as the bitt is offset.
Reply to
Andy Dingley
Thanks. I don't understand how 'term for a web search' is relevant here. The term impress, in subject above, was given by a locksmith and is presumably a term used by those in that craft; no doubt not exclusively. As previously said the lock is about 30 years old. The bitt (never heard of that word in this context) is indeed offset but I am able to make a blank
Reply to
Nick
Am I missing something? if you mean an Abus Discus as here:
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I fear you may be mistaken. I have removed these in a very short time. We gave up on them some while ago. Removed with Record 36" bolt croppers, which will not make any impression upon a Chubb Cruiser or Battleship padlock. New bolt croppers didn't come cheap either. For the sake of information and education, please let me know how "an old Chubb > Cruiser can be removed in mere seconds" I would be most interested.
Reply to
Nick
blade
Surely the bits of the lock that need moving to unlock it will also leave impressions on the black wax. If you file away where any mark is made I can see you ending up with a key that turns in the lock but fails to operate it ! Presumably you need to be able to differentiate between the two cases - maybe firmness of impression or some such ?
AWEM
Reply to
Andrew Mawson
Largely down to feel... If the blade inserted and turned carefully you should be able to feel whether any obstacle is immovable or not. The use of wax, rather than soot, can help to distinguish such obstacles - and determine whether the mark should be cut out or around. You'd soon find out anyway, and there's usually enough leeway in the mechanism to forgive any small errors - though a drop of soft solder can be used to repair larger mistakes ( silver solder is better, if you have the kit ).
Regards,
Reply to
Stephen Howard
On 6 Oct, 00:13, "Nick" wrote:
here:
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then I fear you may be mistaken. I have removed these in a very short time.
The Discus design is a close-shackle design, meaning that you can't get bolt-croppers _to_ the shackle. You have to use it in such a way (i.e. attached to a close-fitting staple) that there isn't room to get them in. If you use a large one on a narrow staple, then it may become croppable (although you'd probably find the quickest route to be attacking the staple itself).
The Discus isn't the strongest case in the world (it's only welded sheet) and is certainly breakable with force. To go better though, you're looking at a "limpet" design where the shackle is internal and the whole mechanism fits under a hemispherical lid. A hinged shackle (like the Cruiser) is a backward step.
Reply to
Andy Dingley
On 5 Oct, 23:48, "Nick" wrote:
"impressioning" in Google finds it, "impress" alone won't (in a useful manner)
Reply to
Andy Dingley

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