Actual LED TVs? do they exist?

Are any TVs just LED? Or is LED just a backlight to an LCD panel? I thought they'd invented TVs where every dot was a tricolour LED, but I can't find any such thing.
Reply to
Commander Kinsey
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You mean like these:
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Not tri-color LEDs, but millions of each RGB color
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Reply to
""Retired"
Funny how I watched The Grand Tour on Amazon Prime at 4K.
And even if you're favourite shitty broadcaster doesn't yet, they will long before your new 4K TV wears out.
Reply to
Commander Kinsey
I seem to recall that there was a problem with overheating and differing efficiencies and light vs current curves of the colours. Also the colours may look right but often were not. I don't know what the likes of Sony are doing but I guess it depends on subjective factors. Brian
Reply to
Brian Gaff (Sofa)
I would not say they are any worse or better than others, but sadly in today's market the makers do tend to cut corners, and depending on which corners get cut it affects life. Samsung tend to suffer with cheap capacitors, Sony often don't test enough, this particularly shows in mechanical rigidity, and firmware cock ups. Panasonic expensive gear seems very good, but it looks like the cheaper end are badge engineered off the shelf products. Brian
Reply to
Brian Gaff (Sofa)
Large TV sets are on offer with OLED technology. 55 inch, 65 inch, prices to match.
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There are a limited number of OLED substrate suppliers. It appears the materials are modular enough, to scale up the design.
There are different types as well. QD is Quantum Dot.
"Quantum dots have properties intermediate between bulk semiconductors and discrete atoms or molecules. Their optoelectronic properties change as a function of both size and shape"
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"Another pain-point for LG will be that Samsung's QD-OLED will actually use the "problematic" blue pixel as its light source and use red and green QD colour filters that in theory, decrease the chance of burn-in. If Samsung's QD-OLED is able to achieve this, and avoid burn-in, the panels will actually be able to show "true colours" as it will not use white pixel filters."
It appears the writers of these articles have taken a few too many "drama classes" in school.
Paul
Reply to
Paul
I've got a camcorder with an OLED screen which got fainter and fainter and redder and redder until now I can only see it in a darkened room.
Reply to
Max Demian
Not from a broadcast feed you didn't. That was streaming over your phone line. Only SKY broadcast 4K, afaik.
Reply to
Andrew
I had a mobile phone a while ago that was OLED. Probably very low power but had terrible image burn.
Reply to
Fredxx
People still use that system? Even Sky TV in the UK is considering moving to internet only. So many advantages, like being able to watch anything at any time you like.
When most people have a 4K or better TV, any station broadcasting 4K will get all the customers.
Reply to
Commander Kinsey
Sadly that is probably true, whether or not those stations are the ones broadcasting the programmes that people want to watch. It's the equivalent of saying (as I remember people saying when colour TV began, though not in these words) "I'd rather watch crap in colour than a decent programme in black and white".
Reply to
NY
There are still people* who watch movies on DVD, so I'd guess that 1080 will still draw some folks after 4k is here.
*
I call those people "not me".
Reply to
Jim Joyce
Yes, if it was the programme I wanted to see. I'd wish it had been made in colour, or that a colour copy still existed, but I'd still watch.
Reply to
NY
I don't. No more than I'd go on a roller coaster with a blindfold on. Removing most of the information makes the experience not worthwhile.
Reply to
Commander Kinsey

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