8 foot ceilings

Just an ordinary 1930s end terrace in the Midlands with standard 8 foot cei lings. We've had no plasterboard on the back room ceiling for at least a year, whi ch gave the effect of 8'7" ceilings. After plasterboarding today, it's real ly closed down the room, just reducing back to 8 feet. Its amazing how much difference it made. And going from a dark timber to the grey plasterboard.
At least in the kitchen we have the ceiling rising towards 10 feet which is nice. Its a shame the standard has become 8 feet rather than say 9 - which was th e standard for even small Victorian terraces.
When I have visited in Liverpool, in the older houses those high 10 and 11 foot ceilings are wonderful. I think if I ever built my own house the first thing I would specify would be "ceilings to be 3 metres".
For new build houses the standard seems now to have reduced to a metric 2.4 m rather than 8 feet, and with losing those extra few centimetres is really pushing it.
Given the chance I don't know why anyone would go for 8 foot ceilings. New "McMansions" - footballers houses etc. - judging by space above doorway s they often seem to have only 8 foot ceilings, which in large rooms result s in terrible proportions. OK they might have a double height entrace lobby etc, but the rest of the house ... Why would architects draw up such thing s ?
Anyway, plasterboarding ceilings really wears me out these days - and thats with 3x6 boards - I used to use 4x8. Simon.
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On 04/11/2017 22:22, sm_jamieson wrote:

Perhaps rooms should be as tall as they are wide. When you build your dream home, you could follow Inigo Jones and go for cube and double cube rooms, at least for the drawing room and the banqueting hall respectively.
--
Max Demian

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On 04/11/2017 22:22, sm_jamieson wrote:

Our house has 8ft, my parents' has 9ft, which makes a big difference, as you say. My wife's former flat (in a converted Victorian detached) had 11ft - very nice!
9ft seems a reasonable compromise between openness and needing a lot more heating, but I've seen some modern houses where the ceiling is so low that people can't have a pendant light fitting on the ceiling!
SteveW
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Pendant lights are an abortion anyway. Chandeliers in spades.
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Dunno. I did in fact go for 8'8" ceilings myself in the house I designed and built myself. But I don’t notice anything when I visit other people's houses.

I did mine the other way, the ceiling beams are galvanised steel folded metal I beam with one top flange missing. The 4' wide immense sheets of paper and foil faced foam that at the entire width of the house drop into those, the timber battens that vary in height across the roof bolt down onto the top flange of the ceiling beams and the metal decking goes on top of that, with concealed fittings under the decking and then the decking is button punched with a thing like a full sized pair of bolt cutters but with a button punch instead of jaws.
Makes the entire ceiling and roof structure very quick and easy to do by one person unaided.
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original question snipped
Rod Speed wrote:

Interesting construction. Have I understood the I beams correctly? Are they like this :- (ASCII art, please view using a fixed pitch font).
----- | | | | ---------
How thick is the steel? What's the dimensions of the I beam? How much do they weigh? Are they put up at 4' centres? How high are the timber battens? What's the pitch on the roof?
I'm not sure what the fastening for the roof looks like. Is it something like a large pop rivet? No, you say that it is a concealed fitting.
Sorry, a lot of questions. I hope you won't get fed up answering.
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Yep

Coupla mm

4" bottom flange, 6" tall.

One person can pick them up.

Yep.

Varys across the roof. 8" at the peak of the flat roof, then 6" and then 4" to give a minimal slope.

It's a flat roof.

Metal brackets are screwed to the top of the battens. These are about a foot long, 3" wide with verticals that go in the ribs that stand up from the deck.
Cant find a picture of the clips alone for some reason.

Correct, nothing goes thru the deck itself.

Don't mind at all, wish I could find some decent pics online.
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Rod Speed wrote:

Brownbuilt ? I made my own button punch for a carport I made.

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On 04/11/2017 22:22, sm_jamieson wrote:

I think higher ceiling work best in larger rooms - say 6m +. They tend to make smaller rooms look a bit cubey. And of course higher ceilings make a room more of a chore to heat.

I've managed a few 4 x 8 sheets with the help of props, but it's a miserable thing to do.
I had some plasterers in to overboard three ceilings. All 3 of them used chopped up board - never more than 4 x 4. One of them used lots of much smaller pieces. Could be a moral there . . .
--
Cheers, Rob

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As you say, 8 x 4 are 'kin heavy. I bought a board lifter for the cottage job. Around ?100 but available second hand, I happen to have one spare:-) Makes single handed boarding easy.
On the architects question, I think they must work in multiples of 400 and 600mm.

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Tim Lamb

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More of a chore? Are you pedalling the generator yourself (or lugging the coal)?
--
Chris Green
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The reason is efficient heating of the living space. The higher the ceiling the more space one has to heat. Heat rises so you are heating a lot of the room before you get any heat lower down. Brian
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On Sunday, 5 November 2017 08:24:43 UTC, Brian Gaff wrote:

Best to put downward blowing ceilings fans in. Or course there is still more volume to heat. Or a more sophisticated internal vent system so recirculate the air. Simon.
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On Saturday, 4 November 2017 22:22:19 UTC, sm_jamieson wrote:

(a) it's cheaper - every row of bricks/blocks to be laid has a cost
(b) reduces the ridge height, so easier to get past the planners, especially with mcmansions which often have convoluted roof outlines
Owain
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On Sunday, 5 November 2017 16:56:20 UTC, snipped-for-privacy@gowanhill.com wrote:

lly with mcmansions which often have convoluted roof outlines

It is down the cost, but new builds seem to not really go below 2.4m - the size of sheet of plasterboard. I think anything below would seem oppressive and not sell. I also think that if a house builder made a point of saying "all our houses have 9 foot ceilings", they could sell for more and it woul d pay for itself. On the other hand, if extra foot is the profit margin ... but I don't believe that for a minute.
If I was confronted with a maximum ridge height, I'd try to get the planner s to specify an absolute height (in relation to a fixed datum), then dig th e site down a bit to allow a higher roof line. If they objected to that the y are just being awkward.
I saw an interesting one - a think a Lady dowager - moving out of the state ly home. She had built on the estate a "bungalow" stately home. It was a si ngle storey but with very high ceilings, and a set of pillars at the front. Inside it was just like a stately home, but with the notable absence of an y stairs. From the outside it looked really quite strange !
Simon.
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sm_jamieson wrote:

My 1971 build has 7'6" ceilings - the height of the paramount boards used in the partition walls.
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On Saturday, 4 November 2017 22:22:19 UTC, sm_jamieson wrote:

eilings.

hich gave the effect of 8'7" ceilings. After plasterboarding today, it's re ally closed down the room, just reducing back to 8 feet. Its amazing how mu ch difference it made. And going from a dark timber to the grey plasterboar d.

is nice.

the standard for even small Victorian terraces.

1 foot ceilings are wonderful. I think if I ever built my own house the fir st thing I would specify would be "ceilings to be 3 metres".

.4m rather than 8 feet, and with losing those extra few centimetres is real ly pushing it.

ays they often seem to have only 8 foot ceilings, which in large rooms resu lts in terrible proportions. OK they might have a double height entrace lob by etc, but the rest of the house ... Why would architects draw up such thi ngs ?

ts with 3x6 boards - I used to use 4x8.

The reason terrace houses have high ceilings is that the windows have to be high to let sufficient light in.
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