OT - Things you might never need to know.

Here is a picture of three German beer steins of the kind people drink from at Oktoberfest and other German festivals:
http://tinyurl.com/qdbyob6
It's interesting to note that they all have a self closing metal lid on them.
That requirement for the metal lid dates back to the middle ages when the Black Death (the Bubonic Plague) was sweeping across Europe. At the time, no one knew what caused people to become sick and die from the plague, but in Germany there was speculation that it was caused by flying insects. People noted that small flying insects would be found in the partially dried up beer on the inside of a beer stein, and they speculated that swallowing those dead or dying insects caused people to become sick with the plague. This was a time before indoor plumbing. People would have to fetch water from a well to do any washing, and often those wells weren't close by. So, people didn't bother washing things, like beer steins, after each use like they do today.
To protect the population from the spread of the plague, the German government at the time passed a law requiring all beer steins to be fitted with reclosable metal lids which would keep flying insects out of the beer. And, German beer steins still have those reclosable metal lids today.
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nestork

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On Fri, 28 Mar 2014 20:34:35 -0700, nestork

not just to keep the rain out?
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On Sat, 29 Mar 2014 04:34:35 +0100, nestork

Reminds me of the catch all section from "The Complete Book Of Pitfalls" the best home how to book ever.
Bee Prepared.
For instance, in what category would you place the warning not to drink beer or cola directly from the can, out on your patio, in summertime? When you're not looking, a bee enters the can. Then when you drink from the can, the bee stings you in the mouth. Aren't you glad to know that? Would you expect to find that under "Painting"? "Appliances"?
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On 3/28/2014 10:34 PM, nestork wrote:

Not true, according to this stein collector. He hypothesizes that lids were sometimes added just to keep dirt out - especially when sitting outside at a table under the trees, where one wouldn't want to risk a bird dropping falling into one's beer. http://www.steveonsteins.com/why-the-lids-real-reason
See also the video "Why Steins Have Lids". http://www.steincollectors.org/library/articles/Lids_on_Steins/lidsonsteins21.html
Summary: After a great deal of investigation, one of the most noted collectors and researchers on the subject was unable to find any record of any such law or requirement for lids on steins. The hypothesis is, again, that attached lids help to keep dirt out, especially when drinking outside. The well-to-do could afford to buy steins with lids, the average person just used a small mat provided by the drinking establishment.
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On 3/31/2014 10:42 AM, Moe DeLoughan wrote:

I have several drinking water cups with lids and capped plastic straws I got from my hospital stays that I use all the time. I can remember a time when I had to keep the lid on any fruit juice I was drinking or those little fruit flies would get into it, especially if I was outside. ^_^
TDD
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