OT: Brakes seizing on electric cars?

Since electric cars virtually never use the actual brake, why don't they seize up from lack of use, like a car which is used once every 3 months does?
Reply to
Commander Kinsey
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You'd think they could do that with petrol cars, or maybe it costs more. I know of somebody who only uses his petrol car about 2 to 3 times a year, and even though he bought it from new, after only a couple of years, the brakes have to be freed off regularly. The garage was doing it every year at the service, but now he's driving round the block a few times every month. That really shouldn't be necessary, this is the 21st century. It's also odd that the brakes get locked ON, when it's sat in the garage with them OFF.

Reply to
Commander Kinsey
Depends whether the car is parked in the garage with the handbrake on. If I was parking for a long period of time, I'd probably leave the car in first gear (or in Park for automatic) with the handbrake off, to avoid the rear brake pads (used by the handbrake) sticking on.
Reply to
NY
Does an electric car "virtually never" use a frictional brake? They can use regenerative braking for reducing speed, so they will use a frictional brake *less*, but I think friction is needed to bring the car to a complete rest in a hurry, or in addition to regenerative for going down a hill.
Reply to
NY
My car has an electric handbrake and I thought it might seize after lockdown of three months, but it was fine. I had to charge the battery first of course.
Reply to
jon
My brakes seize on with the handbrake off (I never use it unless I'm parked on a steep hill - gears hold the car just fine).
Reply to
Commander Kinsey
What lockdown? Do you live in communist China? Everywhere else you could go for a drive....
Mine goes flat in 30 minutes, but it's French. I'd not expect a decent car to ever run the battery flat, nothing should be using power.
You should have disconnected the battery if you were planning on not using it for 3 months. Discharging a lead acid battery is very bad for it. You now have a smaller capacity battery.
Reply to
Commander Kinsey
No, he's replying to someone who expects the motor to be able to regenerate a lot. After all it put that momentum in in the first place. It should be able to slow you as fast as it can accelerate you. I have received a reply from someone with a Chevy Bolt who has worked out it uses 1% of the brakes as a petrol car, so clearly it can be done.
Reply to
Commander Kinsey
Are these disk brakes that are seizing and is the problem that the piston in a caliper won't move or the pads are stuck to the disk?
In the past I have had fixed calipers each of which has two pistons, latterly I have had calipers that only have one piston, and the caliper itself moves so there is pressure on each of the pads.
Reply to
Michael Chare
Equalisation, the caliper slides on a bar to distribute forces evenly in two directions to produce a net zero side load.
Reply to
jon
No you're right. It's because of the Coreolis force. Most journeys are either generally eastwards or westwards, so there is a deflection to either the left or the right*. It's quite to hard to follow this unless you understand fluid dynamics.
*
in the Northern Hemisphere of course.
Bill
Reply to
williamwright

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