Need a new trailer floor

I have a 4x8' tilt-bed trailer. The floor is rotted out. What should I use to replace it? Has a metal rail down the center to support the motorcycle, so that's not an issue. I'd also like to be able to haul some barkdust or river rock, etc.
It's stored outside in the rain, so I thought I needed 3/4" marine plywood. But it appears that ordinary outdoor CDX has the same glue??? And both would need to be painted.
Local bigbox store has some pressure treated plywood. I don't know how to describe it, but on edge it looks like it's already delaminating. And I read that it's caustic to the metal in the trailer. Any experience/recommendations on whether to use that stuff?
What's the best bang for the buck in trailer flooring for outside storage?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Oak planks. White oak if possible. Best reasonably priced would be sheathing grade plywood, saturated with Linseed oil or some other oil that won't go rancid.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/7/2017 10:58 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

There's not a lot of support under it. Side to side, there's one main support at the axle plus the front/back ends. Front to back there are three 1" angle iron supports in addition to the perimeter frame. The motorcycle support channel doesn't depend on the floor for support.
I dismissed the idea of narrow boards. Making them strong enough would seriously increase the weight.

Is sheathing grade plywood different from CDX? More words on linseed oil please. I'd never considered that. I'm gonna be standing on it balancing a motorcycle until I get it tied down. A slip of the foot could be disasterous.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Boiled linseed oil will dry faster. First coat, then mix oil paint with some linseed oil, second coat. Seems like wood needs constant maintenance.
Greg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon 08 May 2017 12:26:04a, mike told us...

What was the original flooor material? Do you keep the trailer covered when not in use? When you had the original floor, were you able to transport river rock or equivalent? On the surface it seems you need something more substantial than what you're suggesting.
--

~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Let the linseed soak in - but not pool on the top. You want to saturate and seal but not "finish" CDX DFP wood be better than CDX CSP, or even worse, Poplar. Douglas Fir ply will stand up a lot better than SPF, sold in Canada as CSP (Canadian Softwood Ply)
3/4" exterior grade Douglas Fir Ply would be the best long term. Mix the BLO with solvent to penetrate the surface, and apply untill it doesn't absorb any more, then wipe off with an old towel
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/8/2017 9:56 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Problem with advice is that people assume you're more knowledgeable than you are... Solvent is a broad term. Can you suggest a particular solvent?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

google it
http://www.doityourself.com/stry/how-to-thin-linseed-oil
John T.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 05/08/2017 06:57 PM, mike wrote:

I always use turpentine with boiled linseed for a nice rubbed finish. It should work just as well on the plywood. Besides, it smells good. I use 2 parts linseed to 1 part turp.
Just make sure it's boiled. Raw linseed oil will still be tacky by the 4th of July.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Varsol, odorless paint thinner, stoddards solvent, "turps" - any number of (usually petroleum based) common solvents used in the painting and finishing world. Not "hot" solvents like toluene or ether or naptha, or even laquer thinners. My "go to" would be the same fluid I use to clean up the prushes etc - generic "varsol" or paint reducer /thinner.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/8/17 12:48 AM, mike wrote:

Some cut.
I'd suggest expanded metal but it isn't all that sturdy. It would give you good traction loading the bike. Maybe you could throw plywood over it when you want to haul things beside the bike. I have no idea how expensive a 4x8 solid metal sheet would cost. Aluminum would probably be pricey but I don't know that for sure.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

.. and cut it with your household snips ! How handy ! John T.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't think many would put this thin aluminum on a trailer bed .. And if the heavy stuff is being suggested - please post the link to that product and price .. John T.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 08 May 2017 17:56:50 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

That stuff is basically "wall-paper"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You would want 6061 3/16 or better for the trailer floor. With 3/16 it will require re-enforcement. Even 1/4. 5/16 os about $280 for a 4X8 sheet, plus shipping. 1/4 is available for about $350 from "by the piece" Regular pricing is $430 and $600 Purring 14 guage over plywood would cost about the $110 you are quoting. And that is all US$ pricing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I used 3/4" pressure treated plywood when I rebuilt my small utility trailer about nine years ago. So far it has held up nicely, though I do keep my trailer in my garage when I'm not using it.
It's hard to beat the cost and simplicity of a sheet of plywood. It's also lighter than solid wood boards and doesn't have cracks between boards for bark dust to fall into. If it rots or gets torn up, it's easy to replace.
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 8 May 2017 15:00:06 -0000 (UTC), HerHusband

When, not if - and the old PTP was a lot different than the new stuff that rots any metal it touches except stainless ot hot galvanized.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 05/08/2017 01:48 AM, mike wrote:

I used 3/4 plywood on mine then sprayed it with used motor oil (thinned with diesel). Re-coat every year or so.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Same idea as the BLO application but a wee bit dirtier.(and using diesel, a bit smellier too!!)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.