British vs. American English

I thought this was interesting. Our Brit trolls, er, I mean. friends can confirm the accuracy.
http://www.playpork.com/mix_british_vs_american_english.html
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On 2/15/2017 4:53 PM, Meanie wrote:

Oops, I forgot the "OT" since it's neither home repair or politics.
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Got caught on the back foot with your knickers down.
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Per Meanie:

"Two great countries separated by a common language."
--
Pete Cresswell

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In alt.home.repair, on Wed, 15 Feb 2017 16:53:44 -0500, Meanie

It's close.
Americans also say dungarees, taxi, handbag, mad**, public toilet,.sweets, tap***. timetable****. trousers,
We say garden if has flowers or, I think, specially chosen plants, or ?vegetables, I think? but not just for grass and trees.
We say pavement but it's broader than the sidewalk.
They have some pubs here but I guess they are pretending to be British. A British guy I worked with went to some bar downtown that had darts, but I don't remember if it was called a bar, a pub, ot even a saloon
Queue may eventually catch on since it's used in computer-talk, but the page is right, it hasn't yet.
We say rubbish once in a while but not for something specific like the Brits do.
We definitely say wardrobe and it means what the drawing shows, a closet on legs or wheels. An actualy closet doesn't even have a bottom, other than the floor.
And we dont' say flat for apartment, despite what the page syas.
**Note: Diary of a mad housewife.
***HOME REPAIR!!
****Maybe not so much anymore but we certainly used to.
I put a u in a few words where other Americans only use 'or". I don't know why I do it.
IIRC, it was Noah Webster who popularized the removal of the u when he published his dictionary and he promoted other changes too, simplifications, that caught on. Maybe I should call them choices instead of changes because spelling was not standardized, even in the 19th century.
I think he also changed centre to center. The successor to his dictionary is the Merriam-Webster dictionary. Despite lawsuits, they were not able to stop the use of Webster as a name for loads of other publications.
The New York Daily News and the Chicago Tribune also tried to make changes but I don't think they had many successes.
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On 02/15/2017 01:53 PM, Meanie wrote:

I listen to a lot of Brit documentaries. I love listening to brits struggle with pronouncing "Glacier" and "Controversy", especially Stevie (Steven Fry) and Simon Whistler. Same word, sound way, way different.
Funny, our two resident Brit troll, ooops, friends (now you have me doing it) have not chimed in.
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On 2/17/2017 8:39 PM, T wrote:

Perhaps they're afraid I have a gun.
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A good reason to leave the EU before they make us drive on the right, use the same mains plugs as them, convert road signs into km, etc, etc.
--
Change is inevitable, except from a vending machine.

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