Broadmoor juniper

Does anyone know for sure whether J. sabina 'Broadmoor' is a male or female clone? Thanks Iris, Central NY, Zone 5a, Sunset Zone 40 "If we see light at the end of the tunnel, It's the light of the oncoming train." Robert Lowell (1917-1977)
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I have found nothing to indicate 'Broadmoor' is anything other than dioecious, as are the vast majority of Savin and most other juniper species. Monoecious cultivars seem to be exceedingly uncommon.
pam - gardengal

female
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But given that it is dioecious, Iris Cohen wanted to know if the clone that is sold is a clone of a male or female plant. I can't find any reference that tells the sex of any of the juniper cultivars. I must admit that I have never seen any berries on any of my juniper cultivars.
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Dirr describes Broadmoor thus:
"A dwarf, low-spreading, staminate form which looks like a neat form of var. TAMARISCIFOLIA when young, but the plant tends to build up at the center with age, the main branches are strong and horizontally spreading; the branchlets short and reaching upwards; the sprays very short, occurring mainly on the upper side of the branches; the foliage is a soft grayish green and is resistant to juniper blight; this clone as well as 'Arcadia' and 'Skandia' were selected from many thousands of seedlings raised by D. Hill Nursery Co., Dundee, IL from seed imported from near Petersburgh, Russia in 1933; all have proved resistant to juniper blight; Zone 4; will grow 2 to 3' high and 10' wide or more..." Staminate describes an imperfect flower with only functional stamens, male.
Dave

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<< I have found nothing to indicate 'Broadmoor' is anything other than dioecious, >> << Monoecious cultivars seem to be exceedingly uncommon. >>
Please explain. We are talking about a cultivar, which in this case is a clone, vegetatively reproduced. All the Broadmoors in the world are part of the same plant. Therefore they would have to be either all female or all male. I would imagine that there is no such thing as a monoecious juniper cultivar, since it never occurs in the wild. Iris, Central NY, Zone 5a, Sunset Zone 40 "If we see light at the end of the tunnel, It's the light of the oncoming train." Robert Lowell (1917-1977)
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On 16 Aug 2004 12:06:39 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Iris Cohen) wrote:
Junipers have to mature to seed setting stages before any observation can be made. Why the interest in Juniper berries. Gin is produced from Juniper berries. Junipers are produced from cuttings.

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