You Hav To See This Man's Work To Believe It - honest

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charlie b (in snipped-for-privacy@accesscom.com) said:
| After you spend an hour or so on | Yazawa's site you'll come away saying "DAMN that | guy is a great woodworker - and truly a master of | his craft! | | http://www.eurus.dti.ne.jp/~k-yazawa/english.html
Interesting site! Thanks for posting the link.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
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Its his patience that I admire - I have so little.
Dave
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Can anyone give me an idea of how his "Trick Joint Box" goes together? It looks impossible! And how are those paper thin fingers cut?
Amazing is an expression of my limited vocabulary.
Jim

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Woodhead wrote:

There's a picture of him hand cutting them with a saw. Looked easy enough. I mean, come on, one tool - how hard could it be? ;)
R
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Woodhead wrote:

Miter the corners of the box, glue it up then make saw cuts acrossed the corners. Plane stock down to the width of the saw kerf - in this case in the thin veneer range, slip pieces in the saw kerf with a LITTLE bit of thinned glue and wait. when the glue dries pare off the excess and carefully scrape or plane off any high bits of veneer. the idea is simple. the execution at this size is probably not simple.
charlie b
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charlie b wrote:

That's a splined miter, a many splendored but still splined miter. Here's a picture showing what the guy in question does - true finger joints the width of a saw blade. http://www.eurus.dti.ne.jp/~k-yazawa/jointwork.html Looks like he had a little blow-out, but that's the wabi in his work. http://c2.com/w4/wikibase/?WabiSabi
R
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wrote:

The site uses frames, this is the link you wanted (I think):
http://www.eurus.dti.ne.jp/~k-yazawa/hishigata.html
-Leuf
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"RicodJour"

Again, Its his patience that I admire. I'd have to make a machine to do that! But it would not be Wabi Sabi! (Imperfect) Dave
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Leuf wrote:

Looking closely at the second and third picture on the page Leuf provided I stand corrected. He didn't take the easy way with veneer thin "splines". He actually cut ectremely fine finger/box joints - and on a mitered corner at that. This man is amazing! To think up this joint is impressive. To be able to actually make it - even if the "fingers" were twice the width of those he actually made - is astounding. A very good designer, a wonderful eye for wood AND the woodworking skills to do this level of work. Truly a rare combination.
charlie b
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"charlie b" wrote in message

Those are all valid points Charlie.
What I would add to the above remarks is that this guy has some amazing physical skills. Great visual acuity and the delicate touch of a surgeon would be required. And the patience of Job. And an almost mystical relationship with tools and wood.
The list goes on. You can not say enough good things about this man and his work.
Another thought I have about this level or artisanship and beauty, is it art? There are always those artistic purists who proclaim that no craftsman type project ever achieves the status of pure art. I think that many people would catagorize Kintaro Yazawa's work as true works of art. I know that I would.
Again I get very humble when I see things like this. My wife, the quilter, looked at Yazawa's work last night and just proclaimed him to be some kind of mystical woodworker. Beyond normal abilities and sensibilities. Sort of an Olympic level artist. Almost beyond our ability to understand or comprehend.
Now that is good! (Funny that she never says anything about me like that!)
Lee Michaels
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Not intendng to detract from the man's work (but perhaps to embrace it...), doesn't his choice of wood and the condition it's in (moisture content, etc.) have a lot to do with what he can do with the wood? Seems like you can do lot more when the wood "likes" what you're doing to it and you don't have to fight it. I know I've had many fights against wood where I chose material that was too soft/hard/brittle/, too porous, etc. Sometmes you go where the wood takes you, sometimes you can gently direct the wood. Brute force seldom seems to help, and more is definitly not better.
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Smaug Ichorfang wrote:

Not sure how you could detract from the guy's work. It speaks for itself far more clearly than a critic could. But it's good for you sanity to remember that he only shows the work that is up to snuff.

If you check out the guy's web site you'll see that he uses a wide variety of woods. Beyond that, any woodworker knows that careful stock preparation and sharp tools are mandatory for quality work.
R
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Smaug Ichorfang wrote:

Absolutely and an overlooked subject in most wodworking books, tapes and magazine articles etc.. Some woods you can use for almost anything and some shouldn't be used for certain applications. Trying to do handcut dovetails in soft pine is normally an exercise in futility, often discouraging people enough to give up on trying again. BUT - if they had the luxury of practicing in mahogany for example, or cherry or maple the problem with crushing and tearing the wood rather than cutting or paring it would be significantly reduced or eliminated.
And using SHARP cutting tools, be it chopping dovetails or turning on a lathe - especially on a lathe is often one more source for success and satisfaction or failure and frustration.
And stock prep is another often overlooked factor. If you've ever tried half blinds when one or both parts are either cupped or twisted, or the ends weren't cut square you'll eventually figure out that that might be why the joints don't close nice and neat, or why your box or drawer etc. is out of square in one or more planes.
Part of the beauty of this man's work is that it requires not only the skill to make it, but the knowledge of his tools and wood. We get blown away by technique but seldom realize the underlying, seldom obvious, knowledge required BEFORE the first tool touches the wood.
This guy is truly a master woodworker
charlie b
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charlie b wrote:

Different strokes, of course, but that's exactly the opposite of what Frank Klausz said at a recent woodwhacker club meeting. He counciled starting on softer woods and working your way up to the hard woods. I suppose the general procedural objective for any hand cut work - patience, sharp tools and don't force things. Oh, and learning a wood's properties on your project stock is not a good idea.
I'd love to see a video of that guy cutting some of his joints. The thing that I've never been able to make any real headway on in my own skills is speed - particularly in the fine hand work. I don't know if it's because I enjoy it so much that I want it to last or if I'm just speed impaired. Probably both.
R
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wrote:

I do wonder a bit at his choice of wood on that diamond corners piece. The diamonds pretty much disappear in the top half of the piece. That may just be the photography, but if I could do a joint like that I'd choose wood for the box that was consistent from top to bottom. That wood there was beautiful enough on it's own a simple miter with hidden reinforcement would have been my choice.
Plus there's a smidge of dirt under his fingernail in one of the photos. That's about all I can find to criticize.
-Leuf
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Leuf wrote:

Indeed. Thanks for the correction.
R
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That's not what he did on this one. Jaw-dropping.
http://www.eurus.dti.ne.jp/~k-yazawa/picture/english/paperde.jpg
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charlie b wrote:

Check again Charlie, those aren't splined miters like you are describing, those are honest to goodness fingerjoints- the width of a sawblade. Even more impressive huh. I'm with John B: shop full of tools for sale, only slightly used by a rank amateur! bc
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Thought I had it figured until I thought some more.
TomNie

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simply mindblowing.....
r
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