Would you have paid?

Page 2 of 2  


I'm afraid I don't understand. You can measure the thickness of a piece of wood with a tape or rule not just to within a 64th, but to .003"?
If someone asks you to to thickness some wood for them, will it be within .003"? Or a 64th?
Let's just say for the sake of argument that 1/64" is the maximum tolerance allowable on thickness planing or sanding. His frame pieces could have been as small as .734". His panels could have been as large as .766". Both in tolerance, but a difference of .032" rather than the .020" he was complaining about. And we don't even know what thickness his frame pieces were - he said they were 3/4". He never said he measured them to .750".
You're right, woodworking has changed quite a bit in the last 100 years. But thickness planers were capable of just as much accuracy as they are today, even without digital readouts. Measuring tools were capable of that accuracy as well.
There's another thing that hasn't changed in that 100 years, and that is wood. It still moves with humidity changes, and that is one reason that woodworking is not done to thousandths of an inch. But the real reason is that it just plain doesn't need to be held to that accuracy. Working to tighter tolerances than are demanded by the plans might make you feel good, but an employee who does so is costing his company money.
I can't tell you what the standard tolerance is in the woodworking industry for thickness planing or sanding, because I've never seen one. I'm not sure such a thing exists. Individual customers can certainly request that their work be done to any tolerance they want, and that's fine. But he never did any such thing.
I mentioned that I do metalwork as well as wood, and that the metalwork is occasionally to tolerances in ten thousandths. Only where it's really needed, such as in bearing fits.
You'll agree that metal is generally supplied to tighter tolerances than wood is, I'm sure. Just for the hell of it, what do you think the tolerance for a 1" thick cold rolled high carbon steel flat might be? Well, for one steel manufacturer whose catalog I happen to have in front of me, it's plus or minus .01". Not that much less than the 64th you think the wood thickness should be held to.
Again, if he wants the frame and panel pieces to match, he should have run them together. Or fiddled with them himself until they matched. Or he could have specified ahead of time to the mill that the piece had to be exactly a certain size. Within a certain tolerance. To tell the mill that he just wanted it sanded to 3/4" wasn't enough.
But that is just my opinion, isn't it?
John Martin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 09 Apr 2004 01:50:34 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (JMartin957) wrote:

Sure you can! It's 1/2 a 32nd! <G> That's actually not that hard to see on many good rulers.
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Half a 32nd is a 64th. But .003" is actually slightly less than one-tenth of a 32nd. That's a whole 'nother ball game.
John Martin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
on my rulers, .003 isn't 1/2 of a 32nd, Barry. :)
dave
B a r r y wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Grab your scale and look at it. Think about what you just said.
(JMartin957) wrote:

of
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Oops! Missed a zero!
I'm thinking .031m not .003! <G>
Neeeevermind...
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

of
Yes.
Within 1/128. 1/64 is excesive.

tolerance
been as

complaining
Learn the difference between bidirectional an unidirectional tolerence. Apparently, you don't know. 770 would have been fine if he had specified 49/64 but he specifed 3/4. Any cabinet maker I have ever known would call a measurement to the nearest 64th. In this case, the man asked for 3/4 and got 49/64.
And we don't even know what thickness his frame pieces were - he said

That's irrelevent.

wood.
It's not going to change that much in a short period of time. They cut it wrong.
and that is one reason that woodworking

Just becase slop work is acceptable to you, don't assume it is for everyone.

See above.
>Working to tighter tolerances

who
Again, irrelevent to the subject at hand.

So do I. 8 to ten hours a day, 5 to 6 days a week. Fifteen years so far.

wood
Don't count on it unless specifed.
Just for the hell of it, what do you think the tolerance for a

minus
See above.
Or he could have

certain
it
If he wanted a very good fit, he should have specifeied but in any case, it should have been closer than what it was.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

So, you can measure the thickness of a piece of wood with a ruler to within .003"? Please tell us exactly how you do that, so that we can all throw away our calipers and micrometers. Certainly don't need them for woodwork.
All the cabinetmakers you know work to a 64th, but you consider that excessive and work to a 128th. I guess you consider them a real bunch of slobs.
Bidirectional vs. unidirectional tolerence? I guess maybe you're referring to bilateral vs. unilateral tolerance. And yes, I know exactly what it is. Are you trying to say that blateral tolerance is unacceptable when planing wood, so that the 3/4" piece should really be 3/4" minus 0 plus 1/64th? Or, to your higher standards, 3/4" minus 0 plus 1/128th?
I'm glad to hear that working to tighter tolerances than are called for is irrelevant. You say you're a machinist. Tell me, when you get an order for a part that has to be turned to plus or minus .002", and you spend an extra hour getting it to plus or minus .0002", how do you explain that extra time to your employer? If you want to do it on your own, that's fine. But remember, we're talking here about a commercial millwork operation.
"Don't count on it unless specifed." Your words. Sounds like what you're saying here is that metalwork, unless a specific tolerance is agreed upon beforehand, will be supplied to whatever tolerance the producer deems appropriate. Which I absolutely agree with, because it is absolutely true. Now, explain to me just how it is different for woodworking. Remember, the guy gave them no tolerances beforehand.
John Martin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.