Wide bards and Timer Warping

Page 1 of 2  

I am just getting into edge gluing to make wide boards, say around 18 inches. Each time that I try the finished board seems to warp across the board. I am positive that the board was flat in the clamp and stayed there for a few days.
Should I use several narrow boards or a couple of wider boards? Is the end grain at the end of the boards important?
Thanks for your help.
--
Garry Collins
Remove the spamno from my eamill address.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Garry Collins wrote:

You can find lots of information on this by looking for things like "edge gluing" in a search engine.
There are lots of others out there with more experience than me, but one way to minimize this is to use narrow boards and arrange them so that the curve of the end grain alternates up and down. If the boards warp, you'll get a slightly wavy top rather than a totally cupped one.
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sadly, you'll also get a board composed of strips whose grain runs in alternate directions.
Can't win can you?
Jeff G
--
Jeff Gorman, West Yorkshire, UK
email : Username is amgron
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You may not be having the edges/board "flat"in the clamps you are using. You may try this,While boards are clamped run a framing square or anything else that you know is straight+true accross the boards to check if infact they are flat. Thats one possibility. use clamps on both sides and alternate them Let us know how it works out.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Start with properly dry materials. Got a jointer? Planer? (or their cordless equivalent?) Rough your stock out to just over it's final dimensions, and allow your stock to acclimate to it's final environment for a couple of weeks. Make sure that air can flow around all sides while you're waiting for this to happen. Then do a final dimensioning, removing material as evenly as possible from all sides. After glue-up, again allow the panel to rest where the air can freely get to all sides, not lying flat on a benchtop, for example. Sealing/finishing all sides and edges will help your efforts, too. Tom
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Garry Collins" wrote in message

there
What is important is the proper selection of your material, all the way from the type, to how it was originally cut from the log, to the moisture content when you use it.
And there is probably no better way to get a handle on that than:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
You will do no better in your search for understanding the reasons for your problem(s) with wood, guaranteed.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 11/06/05
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Also consider that your jointer is never at a perfect 90 degrees. The way to correct for this is to alternate the cuts. Rather than edge join all of the boards with the down side against the fence, alternate; down side against, down side away. Also if you use a lot of pressure on your clamps, they will bow a bit. This is why you alternate clamps, one up, one down. robo hippy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
robo hippy wrote:

set the fence properly. :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
robo hippy wrote:

Why not just fix the tool? <G>
My DJ-20 rarely finds 90 degrees all by itself. Three seconds with the 6" combo square in my pocket and a twist on one lever makes it all perfect. It's so easy that I no longer bother to fine tune the 90 degree stop.
The same can be said for all blades and miter gauges. 10 seconds of checking can save a bunch of rework and wasted material.
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"B a r r y" wrote in message

Agreed ... but I still alternate cuts on the jointer when preparing stock for panel glue-ups. It is a simple, effective way to put a proven geometrical principle to work in my favor.
... and I generally need all the help I can get.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 11/06/05
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Swingman wrote:

The one thing I don't like about it is that (on average) it means jointing half of the boards against the grain...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Duane Bozarth" wrote in message wasted material.

stock
C'mon, Duane ... that's really stretching it as a reason. We're talking edge jointing boards for panel glue-up, not face jointing.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 11/06/05
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Duane Bozarth" wrote in message wasted material.

stock
In my experience edge jointing boards for panel glue-ups that would rank somewhere down there with the least of my worries.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 11/06/05
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Swingman wrote:

'Pends on the stock....I've been doing a lot of maple recently and it is really nasty about tearout...then one has the little flecky spots on the edges that don't _quite_ mesh. W/ something like oak or walnut, one would undoubtedly never notice.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Duane Bozarth wrote:

Or the tearout happens on the corner, which will show on the face.
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"B a r r y" wrote in message

If you guys are having that much trouble with tearout while edge jointing, and as someone mentioned earlier, you guys need to "fix the tool" and hone those blades.
... and rough cut your stock _long_ while you're at it.
<gd&r>
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 11/06/05
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Swingman wrote:

BTDT...gnarly grain on a jointer _will_ have some minor tearout -- going against the grain simply makes it worse...

Do that, too....won't help through the middle if a little chipout occurs...
As noted before, on straight-grained or easy stock, it isn't much of an issue. On other stock it can be a pita. I'd rather have the jointer fence set perpendicularly and joint w/ the grain as much as possible.
Among other things it just sounds better besides to hear the clean swish as opposed to the little breaky-splintery noises...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Duane Bozarth" wrote in message

There are a number of ways to mitigate that problem, one being precisely the method you've been objecting to. ;)

I'd hope so. Why would anyone attempting flat panel glue-ups set the jointer fence any other way?

I gotta admit being surprised at you guys having such resistance to this simple procedure.
In actuality, the 'alternating faces against the jointer fence' method does not, in any way, preclude you from doing that at all.
The solution to what you have been perceiving as a problem with the method is to simply flip, end for end, the offending board in your panel layout during jointing, while maintaining the original intended face-to-fence orientation.
You really should give it a try sometime ... in panel glue-ups, attention to all these little details generally add up to a much flatter results.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 11/06/05
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Swingman wrote:

Gee, your're really serious here???? :)
I thought we was funnin' w/ "reasons why my preference is the one and only way..." :)
But, from a practical standpoint, if the fence is truly perpendicular, the benefit from the swap procedure is precisely _none_. If the fence isn't perpendicular but only close, then it's another variable to add to a potential problem during glue up of requiring keeping track of which face was jointed in the correct direction to make the error cancel.
Plus, I still contend that w/ stock that is prone to tearout (the maple I'm currently using mostly) it makes a lot more sense to joint it in the way preferential to grain direction.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Duane Bozarth" wrote in message

Actually, I was making what turned out to a miserable attempt at "funnin'" ... I was trying to throw Professer Bozarth's best "stating the obvious" tone back at you with a tongue in cheek version of "if tearout is all you're worried about, turn the goddamn board around!!" ... but I got distracted and ...well, left out the pertinent bits.
What the hell ... that's what you get when these womenfolk keep kissing you on the cheek while reaching for your wallet.
Have a good Thanksgiving, Duane ... hope that freeze don't get you too bad.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 11/06/05
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.