why sanding sealer?

why is it recommend to put a sanding sealer on before lacquer finish? what is a sanding sealer.
I used ZAR wipe on stain and after asking the support dept they said i could put a poly or lacquer finish on it as long as I let it dry for 24 to 48 hours after last application.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
trs80 wrote:

There are a lot of forums out there. Here is one I found for wood turners, but same principal. http://www.sydneywoodturners.com.au/site/articles/finishing/sandingsealer.html
I use in on certain woods (oak, ash, walnut) to prevent the grain from raising. Then lightly sand with 0000 steel wool. It seems to give a superior base for when I wax. Just not sure about lacquer.
http://marcalanfreedman.com /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
: why is it recommend to put a sanding sealer on before lacquer finish? what : is a sanding sealer.
Sanding sealer is a version of the same finish you'll be using to topcoat, but one that is easier to sand. You put it on to seal the wood, sand, then apply (coats of) the topcoat.
    -- Andy Barss
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sanding sealer is a relatively inexpensive coating (compared to finish topcoats) that seals the wood grain and is formulated to sand easily. Whether it is required under a particular finish is the subject of some debate. There are varying opinions on its correct usage. http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_base/Lacquer_without_sealer.html
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Oak and many other woods will have little stray bit of fiber that will stick up when a finish is applied. The sanding sealer will coat these little bits and make it easy to sand them away. The result is a flawlessly smooth finish instead of one that that has little bumps all over it. Try spraying some lacquer on a bit of scrap and you will see what I am talking about.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've never used it at home- but I have used it in a cabinet shop, and it really does make a difference to the final topcoat. It dries fast, sands easily, and leaves a surface like glass. When the topcoat goes on, it lays a lot flatter, and does not need to be "built" with multiple applications.
Nice stuff, really. It's worth trying out at least once to see if you like the effect. Particularly good if you go for high-gloss finishing. The only problem- and the reason I don't use it at home- is that the surface is almost *too* smooth. The finished product feels less like wood than I like it to.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Often a matter of preference and desire for a very smooth finish. I have used it on Oak to fill the grain and provide a smooth finish on a wood that can show surface irregularity over the open grain. I have also created very similar results by repeated sanding down to 600 grit. A LOT more work.
RonB

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ok thank you. Good inputs.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.