when to use OSB

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LDosser wrote:

The interior ply are oriented with each ply at a right angle to the next. It's only the outer two surfaces that are random.
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Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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-MIKE- wrote:

On reason I don't use it for construction is that it does NOT hold screws or nails over time very well ...
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www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/08
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coloradotrout wrote:

I inherited a pile of OSB cut-offs when I moved into my current shop. I use it for decks on light-duty pallets, and I've used strips to sticker rough-sawn wood.
It hasn't been a suitable material for anything else I've done.

It's cheap, but not very durable.
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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At work, OSB stands for Obscenely Swelling Board. It's OK for some interior uses, but not as good as ply for holding fasteners. Any application that might even think about getting wet is out of the question.
Unless you're talking about Advantec - now THAT's good stuff.
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Never have, never will.
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coloradotrout | 2009-09-23 | 11:38:43 AM wrote:

There's a cedar-only lumber yard in Dallas that panelled their office in OSB. It's ... unique.
--
Steve Bell
New Life Home Improvement
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coloradotrout wrote:

in the cabinet doors. It looked pretty good.
Bill
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I've used it for shop/garage shelving.
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I've mainly used it for sheathing and covered it with 30# felt and siding. Have used it in the shop instead of Sheet Rock as it is better to fasten stuff to.
Just finished a small chicken coop made of the stuff (primed and painted inside and out!) and a re-enforcing beam some 18' long to tie the two walls of my shop and support the (metal - 5V Crimp) roof. There i ran a 2x10 bottom cord from wall to wall and cut and nailed and glued triangular sections to the rafters above it and itself, then ran another 2x10 nailed and glued and bolted to it like a sandwich and "sandwiched" the rafters above as well. I hope it will tie the tow walls together nicely and will try removing (it was a pole barn I expanded) one of the poles that I, now, feel is "in the way."
I think it's best not exposed to the weather as wet, it swells. Notwithstanding some of the comments I read replying to this post. At Lowes here in NC, its $5.65 a board and a bit cheaper at the local materials outlet.
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I wasn't going to tell anybody but I think I have to get it off my chest. I needed a real workbench and I had to use what I had laying around, and that was some rough cut white oak two by fours and three OSB former shelf-boards boards. I laminated the three shelf boards together with yellow glue, then used the oak for the frame and to band the edges. I figured "This will last me a couple years and then I'll build a real one." Got it mostly sanded down, finished it will Waterlox and put a coat of Johnson's wax on the top. A friend gave me a couple of old quick release vises. Put some drop-down wheels on it so I could shove it around the shop when I had to. (That's pretty much required in that little shop.)
Almost five years later the top is still so flat that I can barely get a dollar bill underneath the middle of a straightedge across it the long way, the dog holes haven't crumbled, and it still serves as a clamping machine and assembly table. It's not especially long or wide but it's got a lot of mass.
I've decided to hold off on the new bench till I find something about this one that I don't like. I put a couple drawers in the center frame. I've grown very attached to it.

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