What is the hardest smoothest finish?

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Tom Watson wrote: I have a rotating wheel that bumps up against a finish that is put on

Sherwin Williams used to have a product called Rex-thane. It's a commercial strength poly intended for high traffic areas, floors, etc.
Tom
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Epoxy, I would think. But now there are a dizzying quantity of epoxies on the market. I would think one of the metal types (think JB Weld) would buff out smoothest w/ a Dremel. You might call 3M and ask.
How about this: you can't add parts apparently, such as a simple tiny (yet highly polished) washer, correct? Is the axle still a nail, as it was when I was a boy? How about modifying the nail? You could pound it out where a washer would be to form a washer of sorts, just something to keep it from contacting the wheel.
Interesting question.
H.
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On Mon, 26 Dec 2005 17:27:07 -0500, with neither quill nor qualm, Tom

That one is. Screw or glue on a steel snubbing plate, Tawm.
--
The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly
is to fill the world with fools.
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Tom Watson wrote:

a little paste wax where the parts come together?
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wrote:

Shellac under wax?
-------------------- Steve Jensen Abbotsford B.C. snipped-for-privacy@canada.mortise.com chopping out the mortise. BBS'ing since 1982 at 300 bps. Surfing along at 19200 bps since 95. WW'ing since 1985 LV Cust #4114
Nothing catchy to say, well maybe..... WAKE UP - There are no GODs you fools!
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wrote:

Tom, How about mixing some diamond powder in with poly? You can get the dust http://cgi.ebay.com/SACHI-Diamond-Polishing-Powder-Micron-0-2-Grade-1-C_W0QQitemZ6589937115QQcategoryZ4843QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem Or aluminum oxide mixed in to poly such as used on pre finished floors.
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How much do you want to put into this, Thomas?
Supposing all the responses are correct in what the 'project' is . . . it is presumed to be an 'indoor' {NOT exposed to UV} item. With that in mind *my* recommendation would be the following schedule - 1} Sand up to 220 grit 1a}If color is desired, use WB DYE at this point 1b}When completely dry, sand away 'fuzz' 2} 'Tack' and vacuum clean 3} Apply a thin, well pushed coat of HARD {5:1 formulation}epoxy {RAKA is the brand I use - glad to give you some} 4} Within 24-hours, apply another coat 5} Apply a third coat as above. 6} After 24-hours, examine with a glancing light and apply a 4th coat as necessary. 6a}Allow to 'cure' for at least 7 days. 7} WASH with warm water {add a drop or two of a mild liquid dish detergent} 8} Dry & sand {with block}using secceedingly finer grits . . . to 340. 9} Apply 3 {or more} thin coats of a clear WB Poly. Sanding between coats to at least 600 Wet. 10} Apply at least two coats of paste wax . . . WELL BUFFED OUT.
Obviously this will take quite a bit of time. What you WILL have is a solid, very hard and very flat base. This will be covered by a very hard intermediate layer {that can be re-need}, to which the 'slick' layer can be repeatedly re-applied. It is also almost totally impervious - and thus allowing experiments with various 'just before use' treatments. Note that 'as is' it is dry and NOT a 'dust collector'.
Regarding the comment about the axle . . . I would fine sand/burnish then polish, wax, & buff well as needed.
Regards & Good Luck, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop

SNIP
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Alright - my curiosity is peaked. How about building two while you're at it and finishing one with just a couple coats of poly that you knock down with some 1500 and maybe hit with a little rubbing compound. I'm going to get daring here, but I'm going to bet it performs just as well as this and previous suggestions. Not to dismiss the value of this and other suggestions, but how much is enough for the given application? Frankly, I don't know - that's why my bet is daring, but I'm willing to put my collection of fruit fly wings up as collateral for my bet.
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Mike - NOTE my FIRST sentience . . .
Also he did ask "What is the HARDEST & SMOOTHEST . . .". No mention of '. . . the EASIEST {that will do 95% of the job}'.
Regards, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop

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.
I didn't question your post Ron. That's why I took the time to state that my curiosity was peaked. I am curious if any of the suggestions are any better than the obvious solution. My guess that the poly approach would work every bit as well as any of the other suggestions speaks more to the OP's quest for the hardest smoothest finish than it does to your response. I suspect he's in search of incremental gains that just won't be measurable.
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-Mike-
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How about Slip Plate paint. Basically graphite lube with a base and binder. Sure makes snowblowers and mowing decks slick.
http://www.slipplate.com /
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Steve - An interesting product & web site.
I've put it on my 'Favorites' list.
Thanks, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop

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I've used it a LOT for various items. The company themselves also make many other types of lubricants as well.
--
Steve Williams


"Ron Magen" < snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net> wrote in message
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Sikkens Autocryl Clear. Harder than a boss's heart. Looks like it stays wet. It's a three-part finish which meets spec for topcoats for Mercedes, Porsche etc. The difficulty is in obtaining small amounts. I have used it in commercial applications where it has stood up brilliantly over the years. If laminate is more robust, it is not by much. The fun part is that one can buy a 'Matting Clear'. By adding that, instead (percentage) of the main Autocryl component, one has infinite control of sheen. IOW, what you have left, can be used in high wear applications like... thresholds. Potlife (Mixed) is about 1 hour. Shelflife opened is about a year. Clean your gun.. I mean CLEAN it with their thinner (part 3).
It is really remarkably tough stuff. Do NOT apply to raised panel doors as the contraction and expansion will tear the door up where the panel is painted/stuck to the rail/stile. DAMHIKT.
I put a cherry veneer fridge panel right next to my gas range and after 12 years of cleaning with a variety of noxious substances, not a trace of wear. Looks new like the day I installed it. If it wasn't so damned expensive, I'd use it on everything. (Comes in 330,00 colours as well. Rolls Royce has a spec for bronze metallic. I have been tempted to lay out the cash and refinish my American Standard Telecaster.... but I kinda like the black it is now.)
Akzo Nobel are the Americanadian distributors.
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Tom Watson wrote:

How about adding a lubricant to the finish? My BIL, who owns a paint company, once finished the slide at a children's playground and added silicone to the varnish. You could also try adding graphite powder or Teflon powder to a two-part urethane or catalyzed lacquer. The hardness of two-part urethane is determined by the ratio of hardener to resin so you could formulate to maximum hardness, add some of the aforementioned cat snot and... you know, "be" the slippery slope.
--
Ron Hock
HOCK TOOLS www.hocktools.com
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