What is it? Set 344

Page 3 of 4  
wrote:

The top piece of the 'clamp' section is not necessarily stationary. If it were, then why the mortice running from the top 'clamp' section to the upper stretcher? Put the photo into an image processing program and add a lot of fill light.
And 'milling' can be a manual process, so the age is not determined.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lobby Dosser wrote: ...

That's what I said; the top section is what the other poster was saying wasn't...

Indeed, but those are definitely characteristic marks of a power planer that weren't removed.
--


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That does not mean it's of recent manufacture. I'd like to point out that electric motors have been in existence for nearly two centuries; even the AC motor dates from the late 19th century. DC motors were used to power machinery as early as 1837.
Further, "power" tool does not necessarily imply *electric* power, either: both steam engines and water wheels were used to power woodworking equipment in the 18th century, if not earlier.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Miller wrote:

That depends on what your definition of "recent" is.
I didn't say it was built yesterday; I'll stand by the assessment it's not yet 100...
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Miller wrote: ...

And, that dates it as not colonial and under the premise that it's rare to have anything that's the first of anything as not likely being an example of some of the first available material having been run thru a power thickness planer or surface jointer.

When was the first modern-style rotating knife thicknesser...I don't know for absolute certain but certainly latter 19th century I'm sure and I'm thinking more likely early 20th or last 20 years of 19th.
You not believe those are planer/jointer marks, btw.... ???
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not necessarily. Think water power. One water wheel driving a system of pulleys and belts can operate a lot of machinery. I agree it *probably* is not colonial, but I'm not willing to say it's *definitely* not.

I don't know. I wasn't able to find any references on that.

I think it's conceivable that they're natural (e.g. curly maple), but I agree it's more likely that they're marks from rotating knives.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
After further consideration, I don't think 1980 was meant for anything other than to sell. Someone put it together and passed it off as an old tool or appliance. All the finish is the same, no patina and no discoloration or wear where a clamped item would be placed. The ball handle is not discolored from oil from someone's hands. No edges are rough or worn from use. The dip in the upper "clamp", where the screw touches, was part of the make, not worn from use. That screw is not so stable that it would hit only at that spot. The center knob piece, under/center of the feet cross-piece, functions to attach the legs more securely. I don't think these center pieces were part of the original idea. The legs ended up being unstable (poor jointery), so those center pieces were added to further secure the legs.... and they additionally gave the faux tool/appliance more ammunition for passing it off as something unique.
Traveling salesmen sold tonics that had no function, but to fill the salemen's pockets. If that piece would ever sell, I suspect another would be put up for sale.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sonny wrote:

If the width if the frame is an indication of the size of the object to be clamped, the sliding bar would be near the top bar and the screw wouldn't have to be stable to hit the dent.
If it's furniture that went to the attic within 13 years, it wouldn't show much use.
Before 1933, a holder for a small barrel of homemade wine may have been a hot item to peddle. In this case, perhaps an unemployed vet showed a sample to friends at the American Legion hall, took orders, and assembled them from kits.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/12/2010 12:27 AM, J Burns wrote:

Could this have been a theatrical prop of some sort?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Miller wrote:

There was power, there was no rotating-knife thicknesser/planer.

No way is that curly grain even from a picture like that.
--



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/11/2010 11:43 PM, dpb wrote:

Some Googling found <http://preview.tinyurl.com/37749jh , which suggests that the original patent for the planer was issued in 1802 and they didn't become available as usable tools until 1827.
<http://www.owwm.com/MfgIndex/detail.aspx?id 9> tells a somewhat different story, but its date of 1828 is close enough to 1827. This, however, also says that Woodworth, the inventor, was quoted as saying that he first saw the technique being used by "the shaking Quakers", which I am guessing means the Shakers. If it was a Shaker invention that puts the planer in the 1790s or later I believe. So it would have not been made in colonial times, but it might be an original Shaker piece.

Doesn't look like curly maple to me either and the pattern's too regular for tiger maple.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yep, both sound reasonable. Also, it could have possibly been a third hand, if it did have a function. The unit is not big or built to handle a heavy object or aggressive work. The "clamp's" max opening may be 10" X 10", but whatever may be clamped, it is not clamped tight... hand tight. And whatever bulk (?) is clamped, seems it would be compressed to subsequently fit or guided into the notched area.
With regard to it being a third hand, if a woman/anyone would be alone; weaving, quilt making, mattress making or some other task using fabric, thread, feathers, cotton stuffing or some other domestic manufacture of a softgoods product, maybe she would need a third hand to hold something stable, as she performs an adjacent task. How many times have we needed a third hand, when clamping/assembling a wood project together?
Its clamping function can't be the end product alone, I don't think. There's some other task to be done, in conjunction with whatever is being clamped.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sonny wrote:

Here's the helping-hand function I visualize. It would display a small wine barrel with the tap high enough to draw a glass.
http://www.winestuff.com/acatalog/Final_Touch_Beverage_Keg_with_Stand.html
With 1980, the four corners of the cutouts would contact the barrel, securing it without much screw pressure. When the wine level got low, the long legs would make it easy to tip everything forward with one hand.
During Prohibition, homemade wine was the only legal alcoholic beverage.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No, 'medicinal' whisky was available also. But that doesn't change your overall point.
--riverman
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
humunculus wrote:

I wasn't familiar with that.
James Madison, primary author of the Constitution, drank a pint of liquor a day. John Adams would drink a tankard of hard cider when he got up in the morning. After terrorizing small distillers by fielding a larger army than he'd commanded in the revolution, George Washington built the largest distillery in North America.
Early in the 20th Century, alcohol was the fifth largest industry in America. Per capita consumption was about what it is now. Alcohol taxes amounted to 30% of federal revenues, so the income tax had to be enacted before Prohibition.
At their 1917 meeting, the American Medical Association voted in favor of Prohibition. In 1922 they reversed their position, saying alcohol was vital to treat many diseases, including diabetes and cancer. The law was changed to permit prescriptions. If you wanted a bottle of liquor, you'd pay your doctor the equivalent of $40 and your druggist a similar amount.
Charles Walgreen had 20 drugstores in 1920. In 1930 he had 525. He hated fires because firemen would always steal a case of liquor.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J. Clarke wrote:

They look like 2x4s to me. In that case, the exact dimensions could date them. in the 1920s, a dressed 2x4 had to be within 1/4" of its nominal dimensions.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J Burns wrote: ...

I also thought that a very good possibility...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Best suggestion so far IMO is Gunner's notion that it might have been intended to hold a wheel or tire.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J. Clarke wrote: ...

I'm on slow dialup so tend to avoid the random googling as generally the load time of stuff is so long as to make it an all day effort for anything I don't have a starting point for.
That's roughly 20-30 years ahead of what I'd have guessed altho I'm still thinking post Civil War era at earliest for this piece and doubt that...
As another poster noted (but I'd held in hip pocket to see if anybody else thought so, too), looks to me like it was fabricated from dimension lumber.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't think so. Look at it after using some fill light on it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.