What is it? Set 319

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1826- a bit of googling suggests it's a precision angle reference/ setter for apparatus on an optical bench- but as Lloyd mentioned, how does it connect to anything?
http://www.solgroup.demon.co.uk/pages/products/index.html
Perhaps for a spectrometer or interferometer, but could obviously only be used near those 2 angles. Maybe even for aligning holographic film?
Dave
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1827 - given the length, I would say an music conductors wand
1828 - number off of a fire truck
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1828 looks like a hang tag for workers. When you arrived you moved the tag from the out to the in hangers. When you left, the opposite. Easy to see who was on time or if a mine, etc. That everyone had gotten out.
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No correct guesses yet for this one, I removed a five letter word at the bottom, it seemed like it would be too easy if I left it there, the slot at the top is another clue.
Rob
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#1825: A cranequin, a geared rack for pulling back the prod of a crossbow.
#1829: Ultrasonic water mister. Put it under water (powered up dry kills them) so it's about 1/2" beneath and watch the fog roll off. Or else install in a model boat as a "steam" effect (actually harder than it sounds to make convincing)
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    O.K. Posting from Rec.crafts.metalworking as always:
1825)    It looks as though it is intended to draw through cutting     something on both sides. Not sure what the something is, but     there appears to be quite a bit of leverage.
    The force is against the bundle of what appears to be rawhide     strips bundled together with a wrapping of more rawhide.
    I'm not sure why the shaft appears to be split -- other views     might help.
    And -- I would like to know what the arrowhead points to, which     would need a view from the other side.
1826)    Yet another thing which could benefit from additional views.     The close-up hows that each division on the main scale is a half     a degree, and the dial subdivides that into minutes (0-30 on the     dial or a half a degree).
    It looks as though it is hinged at the bottom edge of the white     semi-circle, so you could put something under it to be marked to     precise angles.
    But -- it does not look as though the leadscrews on the fine     adjusts extend far enough to handle angles near zero.
    If the maker were in the USA, I would suggest that the color     suggests naval use -- but is also the color of many machine     tools.
    I would like to see the reverse side of this, hoping that it     might give other clues.
1827)    Hmm ... a rod for tamping down powder and bullet in a muzzle     loading pistol? (Too short for a rifle). Hmm --- perhaps for a     howdah pistol -- very large caliber used for dispatching a tiger     who attacks the riders in the howdah on the elephant?
1828)    I think that this is one of the symbols which showed that a     house had paid it's fee to the fire fighters in the region. The     large number probably shows which fire house, it is good for one     year, so the year present, the 391 for keeping track of which     account it is.
1829)    At a guess -- this is some form of submersible heater, given     that the power supply can produce 30 Watts of output.
    It appears to be oil filled -- to conduct the heat to the     outside. The raised black thing might be a thermostat to switch     it on and of to maintain the desired temperature.
1830)    No real guess as to this one. Perhaps the two sockets could hold     flagstaffs?
    Hmm ... pull down on the inner end of the short links and the     flag sockets can fold inwards -- perhaps to clear a low overhead     passage?
    Now off to see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Below is the best view of the other side that I have:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/Album11/pic1825da.jpg
I don't think the arrow points to anything, an image search of 'cranequin' shows that some of these devices have similar arrows but others don't:
http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&rlz 3GGGL_enUS228US228&um=1&q=cranequin&sa=N&start=0&ndsp!
Maybe the arrow was used to hang the device on their belt.
Rob
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Rob H. wrote:

http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&rlz 3GGGL_enUS228US228&um=1&q=cranequin&sa=N&start=0&ndsp!
It would have been used to hang the crossbow the cranquin was attached to from the bow mans gear using a rope or leather trace. Sort of an early sling. The rawhide part is not a universal fit item. It would have been soaked in water, then slid over the butt of the bow until it reached the spot just behind the grip. Then it would be allowed to dry. This held it securely in place and provided the anchor point for the cranquin to operate against as it drew the bowstring. Consider that the common cross bows of the day had between 600 and 800 pounds of draw and you see the need for a LOT of mechanical advantage to draw the bow.
--
Steve W.

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Thanks, that makes sense. I was hoping to find a youtube video of someone using a winder but didn't have any luck.
Rob
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Rob H. wrote:

They are not hard to use. Most had a release that let the rail loose. Then you hooked the T bar over the string. Engage the crank and wind the string back until it drops into the dogs on the lock. Back the crank off one turn to release the string, drop in the bolt and your ready to go.
--
Steve W.

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Rob,

Take a look here: <
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ykrg4rQIO0

The video shows a number of devices for setting the bow string.
Northe
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Thanks! That's an interesting video.
Rob
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    O.K. That seems to suggest that the "arrow" may be a spring clip to hold the crank carriage in the upper-most position -- or a clue that you now have the string far enough back so you can now hook it on the catch of the crossbow.

http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&rlz 3GGGL_enUS228US228&um=1&q=cranequin&sa=N&start=0&ndsp!
    Perhaps so.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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