What is it? Set 319

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Three of the items are unidentified this week, although I think I know the answer to one of them:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Rob
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1826 Dunno, but it appears to have been made for the British National Physics Laboratory (the time-standard folks). It's not concerned with anything between the stops, what with that over-center spring, so it might be for measuring the substended angle of a distant object. What's strange is it measures to minutes (or at least tenths of a degree), but doesn't seem to attach to any kind of viewing device.
1829 looks like an ultrasonic fogger (or humidifier).
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote in message

Thanks! Looks like this is correct.
Rob
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Anybody ever touch one that's running?
they really hurt, and it's a really weird type of pain.
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I've never touched a fogger that was running, but this review of one describes how hot it can get (the descriptions starts at around 1:25 of the video):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gk-Dh7Teg4s

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they don't actually get hot.
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That's because they're water cooled in use. If you try to run one in air (even with water on the diaphram) the case gets hot enough to kill the electronics.
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wrote:

and without a load (the water) the piezo element can be damaged. Same for ultrasonic cleaners - some used to have warnings not to run empty.
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just touch the brass colored part when one is running under water.
it's not hot but it's surprisingly painful, and I wonder why that is.
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Ultrasonic energy will heat the tissues, even though the transducer itself is not hot. Moving molecules are hotter when moving faster, cooler when slower. If your finger tip's molecules are agitated into faster motion, they get hot.
LLoyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> fired this volley in

I might add that the energy also causes gas bubbles to form inside the pores of your skin, and the expansion of those bubbles causes something akin to a superficial case of the bends in your skin.
LLoyd
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In rec.crafts.metalworking Lloyd E. Sponenburgh <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote:

That might be it. It didn't feel like a normal burn, and was pretty fast acting, like an electric shock, but continued to hurt for a bit afterwards.
If anybody gets bored try it out some time.
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On 2010-01-14, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote:

    I would say to minutes. The degrees are divided to half degrees on the main scale, and looking at the size of the divisions on the stop dials, I think that they read 0-30 (seconds in a half degree). It would help if it were rotated in the closeup so we could see the wrap-around point to be sure.

    Unless there is something on the bottom -- but given the pivot mounting, I think that it does not couple below the plate.
    However -- it looks as though it hinges up along the bottom edge of the main scale half circle, so perhaps a piece of paper -- or a flat metal workpiece -- can be put under it for scribing lines at precise angles.

    I can believe that -- and wonder whether the black inverted U is a water level sensor -- perhaps a resistor with a known current through it, and measure the voltage across it to detect when it is no longer submerged in (and thus cooled by) water. This could cause it to shut off before the water level got too low and damaged the device.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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"Would you believe", a carrying handle? I don't think it's a submersible -- a mere 30 watts just isn't enough do do anything to a large quantity of H2O.
The liquid reservoir is the 'hole' one sees in the top.
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    [ ... ]

    For something all of 1-1/2" diameter? It would barely work between thumb and index finger.

    It works only in the vicinity of the diaphragm which is down in the hole. Typically, it would be sunk about a half inch to an inch below the top of the water surface, and it generates a cloud of water droplets as a fine mist above the surface of the water. I think that we can declare the minimum working level for this as just below the crossbar of what you call a handle, and I call a sensor.
    There is something like this (though without the individual head shown here) in the ultrasonic humidifier which I have had for many years now. That one has a floating donut magnet around a shaft which includes a mercury wetted reed relay cell, so when the water gets below the proper level, it turns off to protect the ultrasonic generator. The water, in the case of my humidifier, is supplied from a tank with a demand system so it only gets more water when the water level falls below a preset level.

    That hole would be the mounting ring for the piezoelectric diaphragm which produces the ultrasonic energy.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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    O.K. That works.

    Is the groove just beyond the pressure plate for the adjustment leadscrews a slit all the way to the bottom, or is it just a reference line?

    It could perhaps be placed on a workpiece and adjusted so the groove lines up with some feature to measure the precise angle at which the feature is located.

    Are the knobs large enough to allow handling it's weight?

    Or for verifying that something was made to the proper degree of precision.
    Perhaps you need to find someone who worked for the lab which specified it?
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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1827 looks like part of a manicure set (for cleaning under one's nails)
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wrote:

1826 is clearly some kind of device for measuring angles to high precision. I'm assuming the N.P.L. referenced in the lower-right is the National Physics Laboratory (http://www.npl.co.uk ). Perhaps a jig for calibrating sextants? Or bombsights? Odd that it only goes to +/- 40 degrees.
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    And that it cannot be set to the same degree of precision inside perhaps +/- 25 or 30 degrees. The leadscrews are not long enough, and they can't be relocated.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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