veneering MDF box

I have some 12" x 7" x 9" MDF speaker boxes that I sould like to put a veneer on for indoor home use.
I don't have access to a vacuum bag or cold press so contact cement or iron on techniques are my main focus at the moment. I have limited my veneer choice to the paperbacked variety since it has the best chance with the contact cement method.
I'm considering the following methods of glueing.
1) contact cement both veneer and mdf, let dry to the touch. Recoat if necessary (how do I know if there is too much glue?)and let dry. Install wax paper on the MDF with a cut in the middle and put veneer on top of that. Slide the two wax paper pieces apart and press veneer and MDF together working from inside out with a piece of rounded over 6" x 12" 1" wood stock instead of a "J" roller for the most pressure.
2) apply regular yellow glue in a similar fashon to the contact cement and let dry(again how do I know when there is too much?). using a towel or foil to prevent burning, press pieces together with an iron and "reactiviate" the dried glue. (i'm told that I can use any veneer for this and not just paperbacked.
3) use some stuff called HeatLock from here. http://www.joewoodworker.com/veneering/glues.htm
and follow their instructions.
Which method would you guys recomend for this project? This will be my first veneering project.
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Use 2" wide strips of laminate instead, or small dowels to keep the veneer 'close' but not in contact. then press the centre and as you work outwards, remove strip-by-strip(or dowels). Wax paper sounds way too scary to me....cuz if it rips, you're in a whole lot of trouble.
00
Rob.
"Et tu, Spongebob?"
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wrote:

Traditional hot hide glue hammer veneering. Still the best.
Read Tage Frid's book for advice.
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I've recently been using method #2 here this last week, for applying some shopmade peruvian walnut and honduran mahogany veneers over baltic birch. I was surprised, it works quite well.
Veneering is an eye opener for me. I often run across a short board with some awesome figure in it, but usually it's too small for making a full project. But sliced into veneer, it goes a long way.
My advice: don't go too thin on the glue, iron it on after only about an hour, and use the highest heat setting. Different glues have different activation temps ... Titebond I activates pretty low at just over 100C, but Titebond II activates at about 190C (cotton/linen setting on the iron). I use Titebond II. I iron straight on the wood (it takes a lot of heat), and remove the light scorch marks by scraping/sanding.
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thanks,
I'm looking a lot harder at the #2 yellow glue method lately. Would titebond 1 be better since it melts at a lower temperature and would reduce the risk of burning/tanning the veneer? what about Elmers interior carpenters glue (yellow)? Does it melt at lower temps?

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Most of the articles I've read use Titebond II, but they vary and Titebond I and Elmer's yellow glue are also mentioned.
You may just have to experiment with scrap. All will probably work (at least all of the PVA glues).
Check out Fine Woodworking Sept/Oct 1994, p48 (probably at your local library). Also FWW Sept/Oct 1995, p56. I first read those two articles in the Taunton paperback "Woodworking Techniques."
I'm using this method a lot this last week or two. It works very well for me. I have the best luck with brushing on a slightly dilute mix of Titebond II, usually 2-3 coats dried in between, with a light sanding to remove bubbles. Then iron on the highest setting. There's some very light scorching but nothing that isn't easily scraped or sanded away. My little 1300W iron doesn't get hot enough to outright burn the veneer.
Good luck.
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