Transporting a Unisaw


I just bought a 3HP Unisaw from an estate, a nice upgrade from my contractor's saw except that it needs a better fence. I'll be transporting it 15-20 miles to its new home this weekend on a utility trailer.
After removing the fence rails, extension wings, etc., I'm wondering whether it would be preferable to transport the machine upright or upside-down. In terms of stress on the internals, would one orientation be better than the other, or am I fretting too much over the risk of damage from the trip? It isn't as though I'm going to be climbing boulders or traveling on plank roads.
Any advice from the other cabinet saw owners here?
--
Chuck Taylor
http://home.hiwaay.net/~taylorc/contact /
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My jet Cabinet saw motor came with a support bracket to ease the strain during shipping. Unisaws tend to have a problem with trunions breaking and was usually blamed on shipping IIRC. I would leave it up right and probably remove the motor.
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On Fri, 03 Feb 2006 04:09:58 GMT, "Leon"

That is the best advice. While removing the motor is not absolutely necessary,it doesn't take long to do it and it takes a lot of strain off of the motor bracket that gets transmitted to the rest of the internals. If you don't want to remove it, tilt it so that it retracts into the cabinet and block it up from the dust chute or the truck bed if yours is old enough not to have a dust chute.
Most important is to tie the unit off so that there is no chance of tipping over. The centroid or center of gravity is relatively high. Tipping over and hitting the table edge is what will break your trunnion brackets.
Frank
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I moved a Unisaw a few times and contacted a Delta rep before the first move. They reccomended keeping it upright. It worked fine.
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On Thu, 02 Feb 2006 22:01:45 -0600, Chuck Taylor
I would go ahead and take the top off. You only need to remove four bolts and ones that you will probably need to loosen to adjust things when you get it home anyway. I've seen guys remove the top with the fence and extension wings still mounted to it. Unlike the contractors saw, none of the guts are bolted to the top. If you still need to lighten it up for loading go ahead and take the motor off. With the motor off and the top off two guys can get it in the back of a pick-up.
Mike O.
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Chuck Taylor wrote:

I see them moved from job site to job site in cube vans and trailers. The saws have been disassembled to the same level as yours, and are upright on the vehicle.
One of the guys even made a special case that holds the saw, removed wings and small parts, and turns into a nice outfeed table at the job. The case has hard points for easy tie down in the vehicle. There is no padding in the case.
We will typically treat our own tools much differently than the typical common carrier. Any stationary tool shipping damage I've ever heard about was caused by common carrier, and not the average joe moving it from place of purchase to shop, or from job to job.
I think you're fretting too much. <G>
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You are fretting too much.... you should see how they move pianos. If the motor is mounted correctly, i.e. not straining the belts, there should be no problem. Taking the saw apart just makes it lighter to move.

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I wonder how not straining the belts helps. The weight of the motor is still straining the trunion.
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On Fri, 03 Feb 2006 16:31:40 GMT, "Leon"

If I'm lucky the original shipping bracket for the motor will still be lying around somewhere, but after 20 years or so, it's probably long since been lost.
Thanks to all for the replies.
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Chuck Taylor
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