tongue and grove


Hello,
I just recently bought a rent house to remodel. I own an a/c company so I see alot of things and a couple of years ago I went to a house that this old man took 3/4 plywood ran it through his table saw, ran it through his router and made tongue and grove flooring. I am wondering if anybody knows what kind and where to find these kinds of router bits. I have an assorted set that I use to make different things but I need a set of tongue and grove, to make the flooring and to make some cabinets. I tried looking around and dumb asses at Home Depot and Lowes don't have a clue what they have in stock.
Thanks for any help.
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<http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shopsite_sc/store/html/smarthtml/pages/bt_tongu.html
Putting a profile on plywood will tear through router bits pretty quickly.
You could go to google.com and search on "tongue and groove router bit" also. Be sure you put to "o"s in groove!
JP
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Jay Pique wrote:

I'll due that, two... :)
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Why do you even bother going there?
www.infinitytools.com www.routerbits.com
Both are good quality.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

And if OP intends to make much T&G out of commercial plywood, he'll need good quality carbide to stand up to the glue lines--and even then, he'll get grooves in places where he's not expecting them after a while...
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Duane Bozarth wrote:

Ridges, actually... :)
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M a J wrote:

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M a J wrote:

Just purchase a 1/4 inch grooving bit from a woodworking store or online for your router. Then either mill or purchase 1/4 inch stock and for the splines, rip them to the proper width and glue them into you grooves on the plywood. !/4 inch plywood would work well for the splines because it is slightly less than 1/4 and should fit well in the grooves
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My new house in Northern Calif. is 3 weeks from completion. I built a dedcated woodworking shop behind the garage. I went to the lumber mill just up the road to enquire about buying oak lumber to prep for flooring.
They sell the raw oak boards at $1.50 per running foot.. But they advised me to look at a scrap piece of milled flooring before I undertake the project. Aside from the tongue and groove jointing on the long edges, the bottom has some critical rebate grooves. These gouges allow the boards to lay flat at alll times. And they prevent cupping from heat and moisture expansion. And every board must be run through an accurate thickness planer.
The only way to mill these dados on the flats is with a shaper. Not only that, the shaper would need a power feeder. The lumber also needs to be planed. Again, you'd need a power feeder there, too. When you hand feed, the feed rate is inconsistent, so the boards won't come out equal thickness,leaving the floor with edges sticking up and breaking off.
So the three steps are: a) tongue and groove on edge b) dados on underside c) perfect thickness
A router might be able to do the tongue & groove. But you need a shaper and planer with power feeds for the rest.
The raw oak lumber sells for about $1.20 a board foot. That's a lot bettter than milled oak flooring at about $5.50 a foot. When we build a second house on the land we have, I'm going to do this. But I am prepared for a massive amount of work to mill the wood. You need the machinery because the first requirement is very hard wood. Unless you want Pine flooring.
Gary Curtis
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snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

<snip>
Note that T&G as used in flooring is not what one normally thinks of as T&G...the pieces don't touch on the bottom nor does the tongue "bottom out" in the groove. Additionally, the tongue is generally chamfered a bit.
-- dadiOH ____________________________
dadiOH's dandies v3.06... ...a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
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happy thanksgiving all!!
hey about the t&g....There are so many ways to do that but if you are going to shape alot of linear footage there are bits used for this called spline cutters or "wing" cutters. They come in various cutting widths and can be stacked or seperated what ever the application calls for... Dadioh speaks with experience ... The reason for the tongue not to bottom out is for expansion and contraction... The bottom shoulder not touching is for the same reason. do you have a shaper w/feeder? if not I suggest a HD router and a good feather board and hold down setup. finally got all my legs for the Kitchen table spun, while they are not exactly Identical they are darned close.
health n laughter,
Bren
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M a J wrote:

You could also...
1. use biscuits
2. cut a groove in both pieces and use a spline. A way to do that besides router is with a radial arm saw.
-- dadiOH ____________________________
dadiOH's dandies v3.06... ...a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
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