Tips for an organized workshop

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I'm guessing that should have been 1981?
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BillGill wrote:

Whoops, 1998. It might make some difference.
I think one of the changes along through that time was that they did switch to CAD. The drafters were trained in using the software, which could sometimes be about as hard as design software, and all the standards so that other people could read the drawings.
Bill
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I was wondering too. ;-)

Discouraged? I graduated (BSEE) a quarter century before that, but never took a drafting class. I don't know anyone who did, in fact (at least as a college credit).
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On Thu, 27 Aug 2009 11:40:42 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com"

I graduated BSChE same time frame. Everyone in the College of Engineering was required to take 2 quarters of drafting, even the EE's. I did very few formal drawings in the real world, but I was glad I took the classes. World of help when it came time to update PFD's, P&ID's, run sheets, etc. I even use what I learned for woodworking design sometimes.
Regards, Roy
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gmail.com> wrote:

There were a lot of things that were required of other engineering students that weren't required of EEs (TAM, Thermo, QM, statics, dynamics). Drafting wasn't required of anyone other than CEs and MEs, AFAIK. There was too much relevant stuff to do to bother with pencil sharpening 101. ;-)

That would be the only reason to have taken it, but wouldn't justify the time taken away from something else.
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Yeah, and CAD, especially CATIA drivers are paid quite well. My company won a major training system contract during the mid-90's and we needed aircraft CATIA drafts people to support engineering. About that time Boeing started one of their 67X program and our Wichita operation got into a CATIA war with Boeing Wichita, and Seattle. We hired young CATIA designers at $45 to $50 and Boeing was luring them with increasingly higher wages. Before it was over we lost all of our contract designers beacause they could make around $80 plus per diem @ Boeing - again, the 1990's.
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I went through two years of design technology it Pittsburg State University (Ks) and graduated in 1967. The tech school provided more drafting knowledge in the first semester that college grads ever get. Then they provide architectural, machine design, illustration, and several applied tech courses like electricity, structural analysis, machine shop, welding, etc. You come out pretty well prepared to get started in anything but aircraft. So I hired on with an aircraft company, but survived.
A couple years after I started working I decided to go for a business degree and went to school, while raising family, for 8 - 9 years. Desperate to graduate in '78, I started quizzing out on anything I thought I could. The Wichita State industrial dean suggested I take Drafting 102 and 202 which were the only drafting courses they made engineering students take. I had been off the board for a few years then but said OK and paid my fee. Took both exams the same morning and left thinking I must have blown them because they were too easy. A week later I stopped at the deans office for my grades. He looked over his glasses at me and said "I'm not too happy about this!" I aced both classes and got the highest grade in the advanced 201 class. He was pissed and I was flabbergasted that these kid didn't learn much.
Ron
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wrote:

Sometimes, when I use a marking knife it can be hard to see the line, depending on the color of the wood.
So I use a pencil to darken it, and an eraser to remove the graphite outside the scribe line. I get a fine dark line.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

What did you pay for the modern equivalent of a cigar box? Walmart has them for $1.00. Walmart even sells the school uniforms. My girlfriend looks hot in the short-skirt model (I play the wicked headmaster).
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On sale, this week at Staples, $1.00, in large and small.
If you have pictures, will you share?
MJ

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Remember those erasers we used to put on the pencils after the original pencil eraser wore down? They work great as a cap for the air fitting on my nail guns to keep dirt and crud out of the gun when not in use. I saw Handbills tool is selling caps that do the same thing for $2 each. Two dollars (about one pound and four, Jeff) buys a dozen or more erasers.
Regards, Roy
On Mon, 24 Aug 2009 14:50:19 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com"

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Roy wrote:

Good tip.
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wrote:

And, while there, drive around to the back of the store and check out their Dumpster. I found a UPS, a paper shredder, pencils computer cables and, at New Calendar time tons of desk-size calendars that i use as scribble pads for myself and my grand kids. The dated diarys and such are not worth much to adults, but kids can get a lot of play time out of them.
Be sure to place your Green and White "Diver Down" flag where folks can see it before "going in." (;
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On Mon, 24 Aug 2009 14:50:19 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com"
Use different types or colors of tape at each end of all your portable corded tools. When you need to unplug it from the tangle of cords you can find the one you need right away. Works on entertainment centers too.
Beyond that, once you get the place organized don't post any pics of it here or they'll think you don't actually do any work ;)
Actually I've come to the conclusion that we are all exactly as organized as we need to be. Necessity is the mother of organization.
-Kevin
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