The Best Saw Trolley, 4' X 8' Panel Cutting System . . .


I'm a newbie . . .have a Delta Table Saw, but realize I don't have the skill to rip a 4' X 8' sheet of plywood on a table saw. So I'm looking for the best gadget, method or combination of both to accomplish this task . . .
I have seen dozens of different systems to rip 4' X 8' sheets of plywood. Some are trollies with horizontal and vertical runners, some are sleds, some just offer a straight edge . . .
Anyone with any experience with one of these that really works well, please let me know . . .
Thanks, Steve
P.S. O.T. How do I hide my e-mail address so the spammers don't see it and bombard me . . .
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Depends on your budget. A straight edge with a pair of good clamps works fine. I did that for a while, then upgraded to a straight edge with and edge clamp built in. It is much easier, but also more expensive. A step up from that is the one with the sled built into it. I don't see the point of that for cutting since the circular saw wants to go straight, so just running it against the straight edge is easy enough. It might be helpful for routing slots because the router wants to stray, but you didn't ask about that.
Hiding your email is easy enough. Go into tools/accounts/properties (or something like that) and put in a whimsical email address.
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An appropriate height outfeed table should be sufficient. If necessary a table or roller stand for infeed. Much less cheaper than building a panel saw.
Worst case scenario, cut it up with a power hand saw and then trim them to size on the tablesaw.
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wrote in message

Find a helper for ripping sheet goods that large on any saw. Or do them with a saw guide and a circular saw. The archives are full of discussion on how to build and use them (simple). Many of the veterans recommend doin it that way, for good reason.
Patriarch
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Holzer makes a nice panel saw....;-)
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Knothead (in 1120217444.2a1ce734d6692542d02a429e1b7f115a@teranews) said:
| Holzer makes a nice panel saw....;-)
Or you can build your own. See http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/panel_saw for an example. I'm using some unusual tooling to build mine, but the job can be done otherwise with a little creativity.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html
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said:
| Holzer makes a nice panel saw....;-)
Or you can build your own. See http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/panel_saw for an example. I'm using some unusual tooling to build mine, but the job can be done otherwise with a little creativity.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html
What are you routing the "U" grooves on? Is that an overhead cnc rig or a manual x and y router?
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Google "Sawboard". For example:
http://members.aol.com/woodmiser1/sawbd.htm
I use this and a relatively small circular saw (a PC Sawboss) to cut down big sheets with very good accuracy.
Lou
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Steve, First . . . WHY does it have to be on a tablesaw? I did it . . . once. It was basically a 'freehand' endeavor. Accuracy was no great issue because it was a rough cut, anyway.
If your intent is to just cut-up more 'workable' sections . . . getting a small cordless circular saw would be a better use of money & time. {You could probably get away with an 'ultra-cheap' one from Harbor Freight}. Trying for an accurate cut - with a full sheet - on a tablesaw is a 'fools errand'; at least in my opinion.
I have a 105 inch aluminum 'Guide' that cost me about $20 . . . about 15 years ago. Variations are still available. This is what I use when a LONG, ACCURATE, STRAIGHT cut is required. Otherwise, I would use my OLD Sears 7-1/2in circular saw with a 'rough cut' blade. Recently, I've gotten a Ryobi cordless {4-1/2in ?} circular saw. A very handy tool. Lay down some scrap 2x4's, or a 'slab' of 2in thick Insulation Foam, lay the sheet goods on top . . . and have at it. Set the blade depth about 1/8in 'deeper' than the ply and there should be no problem 'freehanding' the cut.{There are numerous ways to make 'custom' guides as well}
Regards & Good Luck, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop

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<snip> Trying for an accurate cut - with a full sheet - on a tablesaw is a 'fools errand'; at least in my opinion.
<more snippage>
Fools errand? I get cabinet grade full length rips from my table saw every time and know several others that do as well. The OP is better off making a proper outfeed table and learning how to use what he has...
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Possibly so...most folks with smaller saws are not ready or capable of doing that. I have a giant table saw and I always cut plywood with a guide and circualr saw. It's much easier and much safer in my opinion.
I'm a pretty good sized fellow and I can hardly manage horsing a full sheet of oak plywood up on a table saw.
I do know pro cabinet guys who can do it but I think the "average" weekend warrior is risking too much for the honor of saying he can do it.
Knothead wrote:

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<snip> Possibly so...most folks with smaller saws are not ready or capable of doing that. I have a giant table saw and I always cut plywood with a guide and circualr saw. It's much easier and much safer in my opinion. <snip>
To properly cut on a tablesaw you have to have in and outfeed tables. I would never suggest nor did I imply that your should just flop a 4x8 onto the saw. To try and beef a piece of sheet stock onto the saw is stupid, but if you know your going to work alone you need to design your shop for such contigencies. I used Morris Dovey's tilting bench idea for a conference table I did some time back and modified it to my saw height and laminated it so it was nice and slick. Now I roll the bench to the stock pile then roll over to the ts and tilt the table up into position and push full sheets through.. To create this thing was a few hours of work and about $65 of materials. (Oh and yes, I scrutinized Morris's website). It's safe convenient and will work for about any kind of table saw .. depending on the outfeed table. When not in use the tilting bench fits nicely against the wall and will comfortably store 4 sheets of 3/4 stock. My meaning was simply to work with what he has and learn how to get the best out of it. Oh and originally if he has the cash the Holzer is a sweet rig....
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The primary scarcity most of us have to deal with is the required 9' in front of, and 9' behind, the sawtable. The use of the sawguide reduces that significantly, in addition to the valid safety and convenience issues others have detailed.
Patriarch
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I bought the Penn State panel cutting hardware in 1997 and have been very happy with it. Uses circular saw or can be configured for router as well.
On Thu, 30 Jun 2005 23:28:43 -0500, "Steve DeMars"

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A much simpler solution is a piece of 1/4" plywood with a fence running the length of the ply. Using a decent circular saw, you can deal with any size plywood.
Here is short version:
http://www.woodworkingtips.com/etips/etip022500wb.html
The author uses 3/4" plywood which is major overkill and would make a 8' much too heavy.
Steve DeMars wrote:

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etip022500wb.html refers to cutting a post formed countertop
I think you meant http://www.woodworkingtips.com/etips/etip010810sn.html This works very well, and with a good blade is fine for a final cut, not just a "rough" cut as described. The guide is accurate, easy to make, easy to store, and inexpensive. I've ripped and crosscut full sheets on my cabinet saw using infeed and outfeed supports and though it is possible, I'm seldom comfortable with it. A 4x8 sheet is just too big compared to the length of fence in front of the blade. I've considered various fence extension fences, but if I'm going to store something that big, it may as well the guide for the circular saw.
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wrote in

I built this one: http://www.thewoodshop.20m.com/panel_cutting_table.htm for about 20 bucks in a few hours, used the factory edges of a couple plywood sheet and some hardboard to make some guides, and I'm very satisfied. I've got a small shop with no room for a standup panel cutter. Put a piece of plywood on it and it doubles as extra table space. Used it to cut the flooring and the sheet vinyl for the bathroom floor. My lower back loves me for it.
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