Tapering Legs (TS or BS?)

When performing leg tapers, which do you prefer? I think I prefer to do these at the TS, but on my last project I made my tapers (albeit small tapers) at the BS. They required a little sanding after, but so do my tapers at the TS.
Which machine do you turn to for tapers most often and why?
Thanks for your input
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www.garagewoodworks.com



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Table saw. It's easy and probably more accurate (and certainly faster) than using a band saw.
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I make a template, rough them out on BS, and use the template and router to get to final shape.
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I like the bandsaw and jointer cleanup. If you're tapering four ways, doublestick your cutoffs for stability or shim the end. Makes things more stable, though you can do without.
Of course, a hand plane or spokeshave works instead of a jointer if you're into hand work.
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I use a table saw for most tapers, employing some home-made jigs. I don't trust my skills on the bandsaw for any significant straight cuts. Marc
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I do it at the tablesaw, with a shop-made taper sled and a good rip blade. The stop blocks are simply screwed to the sled as needed, pictures of fancy versions with T-track and laminate are all over the web. Repeatability is brainless and perfect.
With the sled, it's really obvious where the taper will land, the sled supports the work for a clean cut, and the operation is very safe. As a bonus, sides 3 and 4 are easily double-stick taped back to the work for perfect results.
I own a good bandsaw, and find the above method far better.
Aluminum tablesaw taper jigs should be outlawed. <G>
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Sleds are the way to go for tapered legs. If you don't want to use the double-stick tape, put a 1/4" dowel in the center of the stop block and drill a 1/4" hole in the bottom of each leg. Cutting the tapers on all 4 sides is just a matter of cutting a taper, pulling the leg off of the dowel, rotating it 1/4 of a turn and plunking it back on the dowel. I do a lot of tapered legs and find this to be the fastest cleanest way of doing it.
Legs that are tapered on two sides and straight on the other two can be made by offsetting the dowel. I have a series of stop blocks that offer various kinds of tapers. Calculating the offset of the dowel is left as an exercise for the reader. :-)

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Vince Heuring To email, remove the Vince.

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On Sun, 21 Oct 2007 08:36:50 -0600, Vince Heuring

Hadn't heard of the dowel. THANKS!
That's why I love this forum!
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wrote:

I forgot to mention...
My taper sleds use the miter slot, not the fence, for guidance.
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I use my table saw for all leg tapering, utilizing a few home made jigs. I don't trust my skill level on the bandsaw for any significant straight cuts.
Marc
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I use a sled for all taper cuts. Anything under about 2-3/4" thick gets cut on the table saw; over that, on the band saw, with the surface cleaned up on the jointer. Same sled works on both saws, and I don't need to worry about freehanding a long cut through thick lumber on the BS.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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