Table

My sister father-in-law passed away about 4 months ago. He was a wood worker and has quiet few tools He has an old craftsman table saw at least 40 years old it's all cast iron, it's 110V so it's my guess it's 1hp. ( I'm not in there area to look at it) He said there is two dado blade sets a bunch of blades, only a couple are carbide. I don't think they know what else is for the saw. There is also an old Band saw, and a 4" planer cast iron. There is also some old hand saws, plains* , I'm sure there quiet an assortment of hand tools. They are trying to clean the house to sell and of coarse the tools are going. I would buy some of them myself but I have a big power matic 66 I'm pretty tooled out threes nothing I need . He is not sure what to ask for the Table saw I have seen it best description it's between a contractors saw and a uni saw. If anyone has an idea of the value I know it's hard with seeing it or better yet is interested in buying I can get more information. The Tools are in the SF bay area ( Hillsboro ) * Some guy came buy and bought some 3 of the plains for $100 he picked threw what was there well somebody got a deal on some old plains at least 50 years old. So if somebody is interested post it and I will get back to you.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My guess is if the saw includes the cast iron table extensions (either solid or webbed), runs well, is NOT terribly rusty, etc., it MAY bring $75-100. If the extensions are not there or if the top is badly rusted...or both...$25-50 is probably the very best that could be expected.
Sears table saws of that vintage (I have one) do NOT have good fences. Whomever buys it will have to put on an aftermarket fence in order to do work of ANY quality at all.
You didn't say whether the saw is driven by a belt or a flexible drive shaft. Belt drive saws will bring higher prices because they can still be reconditioned. Parts for the shaft drives are getting scarce. And the shaft drives really strain to turn a stacked dado set.
If the saw is a shaft drive, badly rusted and missing the extensions, it is probably a throw-away.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Really? My father had just such a saw, and he had a custom cabinetmaking business for many years, and I assure you he did quality work.
And gosh, I bet that fence had *over* two thousandths of slop front-to-back!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


And he probably just "eye-balled" it to line it up, huh.
Max (yeah, right)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No, I imagine he used a combination square clamped to a miter gauge.
If you think you need machinist's instruments and atomic clocks and GPS to set up woodworking equipment, you obviously don't know much about woodworking, friend.
It ain't that blessed critical.
Two thousandths of an inch. Ha!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


I used a Craftsman table saw for almost 20 years (1968 'til 1987) before I got my Delta w/Unifence. I produced some fine furniture but it was always an annoyance setting the fence. With the Unifence I check it at the beginning of an important project and have confidence, from experience, that it will stay aligned throughout the project. It's not impossible to produce quality with a cheap ass fence but it can be a pain in the butt; especially when time is of the essence. I like to make things out of wood, not screw around with the tools. YMMV
Max
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.