Suggestions for a fine cut

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I need a bit of help making a final cut in a project I made for the wife.
If you view the photo from the posted link below, you'll see the project I'm completing.
In the photo, on the left side of the board opposite the motor, is a sliding block which holds a bearing and small shaft to complete a double end connection for a bobbin. On that block, you'll notice a fine slit down the center and a sex bolt on the side, to tighten the bearing into place. I can only imagine the slit was made, or can be made with a bandsaw. Unfortunately, I don't have a bandsaw, but I need to make that slit in order to tighten down the bearing on my project. Obviously, a table saw, RAS, jig saw, etc. will have a blade wider than needed thus, I'm asking for suggestion how I can get that small slit without a bandsaw.
Thank you
http://www.leclerclooms.com/08winderB.jpg
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Handsaw. Almost any one will do, some will do finer kerfs than others.
You can also cut the block in half, remove the desired amount from the side(s) and glue it back together.
Could you simply drill a hole the exact size of the bearing and press it in with a clamp? (It may not work with all bearings.)
Puckdropper
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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

I was originally planning to permanently press or glue the bearing in place, but I decided not to in case it needs to be removed/replaced.
Thanks
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On 8/8/2011 4:35 AM, Justin Time wrote:

Now that you have mentioned the desire to replace the bearing and it not be a permanent placement, consider using a screw/bolt that tightens into the side of the bearing rather than squeezing the wood up against the bearing.
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Uggghh! Damn good idea. Now I don't know what to do.
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"Leon" wrote:

---------------------------------- Having spent time as a ball bearing application engineer, I offer the following observation:
The outer race of a ball bearing doesn't like point loading that will develop using a bolt to secure it.
The wood clamping the bearing in place is the preferred method.
Lew
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The task is complete and I did the wood clamping method. I used my fine double sided pullback saw which came with my reciprocating saw. The result turned out very well.
Thank you
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On 8/8/2011 5:49 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

I would tend to agree but my wife is a quilter, has a similar set up and the motor just does not spin that fast. The bearing outer race would need only the slightest of pressure to keep it from spinning. you could probably wrap paper around it and the fit would be tight enough.
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I believe I do at work. I'll know today when I arrive.
Thanks
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My suggestion would be to use a jigsaw, and get for it a hollow-ground blade with zero tooth set - basically a Japanese pull saw in a jigsaw blade.
Or cut it by hand with a fine-tooth Japanese pull saw. You might get a straighter cut that way than a jigsaw would give you - the jigsaw blade might tend to wander a bit if the stock you're cutting is thick, unless you take it very slow.
Tom
"Justin Time" wrote in message
I need a bit of help making a final cut in a project I made for the wife.
If you view the photo from the posted link below, you'll see the project I'm completing.
In the photo, on the left side of the board opposite the motor, is a sliding block which holds a bearing and small shaft to complete a double end connection for a bobbin. On that block, you'll notice a fine slit down the center and a sex bolt on the side, to tighten the bearing into place. I can only imagine the slit was made, or can be made with a bandsaw. Unfortunately, I don't have a bandsaw, but I need to make that slit in order to tighten down the bearing on my project. Obviously, a table saw, RAS, jig saw, etc. will have a blade wider than needed thus, I'm asking for suggestion how I can get that small slit without a bandsaw.
Thank you
http://www.leclerclooms.com/08winderB.jpg
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I was thinking about something along the same line with my very fine tooth pull saw which is made for my reciprocating saw. My concern was keeping it straight since it's extremely flexible as it's a double sided saw. I might give it a whirl.
Thanks
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On 8/7/2011 8:51 PM, Justin Time wrote:

Coping saw or hack saw.
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On 8/7/2011 8:51 PM, Justin Time wrote:

Obviously you need one of these:
http://www.lie-nielsen.com/catalog.php?grp 70
No, really.
--
Free bad advice available here.
To reply, eat the taco.
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On Sun, 07 Aug 2011 21:45:45 -0500, Steve Turner

Or a $4 coping saw, which he could probably borrow if he doesn't already have one.
-- We are always the same age inside. -- Gertrude Stein
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On 8/8/2011 12:51 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

<shaking my head>
The man has a perfectly good excuse to buy a new tool (my suggestion is to get one of the best money can buy; why scrimp?) and you think he should BLOW that opportunity? Come on; play along here.
--
See Nad. See Nad go. Go Nad!
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On Mon, 08 Aug 2011 07:04:19 -0500, Steve Turner

Sorry, but I can't condone Lie Nielsen or Festool prices, no matter how good they might be. I'd rather purchase ten Satanleys and/or a couple of Makitas, respectively. I'm che^H^H^Hvalue-oriented and could not care less what specific brand a tool is, for the most part.
I did, however, recover from my sin of omission (no tool purchase suggestion) with the Japan Woodworker links in the next post. I strongly feel that a Ryoba pull saw would serve him better than a way expensive, pretty rip handsaw. What's your take now?
-- I merely took the energy it takes to pout and wrote some blues. --Duke Ellington
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On 8/8/2011 8:07 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

I strongly feel that you need to try the Lie Nielsen before drawing that conclusion. I've owned half a dozen pull saws of various brands and countries of origin, and none have had anywhere near the control and accuracy as the Lie Nielsen. And it's not THAT expensive. I've used, grumbled at, and tossed aside enough pull saws to more than pay for the Lie Nielsen, and it's still in perfect condition. Sometimes you DO get what you pay for...
--
"Our beer goes through thousands of quality Czechs every day."
(From a Shiner Bock billboard I saw in Austin some years ago)
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On Mon, 08 Aug 2011 20:37:23 -0500, Steve Turner

I helped Frank Klausz at an American Woodworking show once and got to feel a nice Independence saw, so I have tried one. (Didn't LN buy them?)
Whoa! I didn't know that Paddy O'Leach started that co! He's one of us! http://goo.gl/t5xoz

I'm glad you like it. I fell head over heels in love with the concept and implementation after my first time cutting with a Japanese pull saw. It's not perfect and it can't be used for everything, but I reach for it far more often than I do for a regular hand saw, and my Lee Valley dovie saw (Franch import) is unused now. I'm more precise with one that with a western saw, which is my bottom line.
-- I merely took the energy it takes to pout and wrote some blues. --Duke Ellington
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You don't tell us what tools you have to work with so everything is a shot in the dark...
If you have a table saw you could cut the block 1/2 way thru with a 1/8" kerf blade, then turn it over and cut the other half with a 3/32" kerf blade. That would leave a 1/64" step on the both faces. Glue it back together and drill the hole for the bearing.
Or you could find a someone local with a bandsaw...
Larry
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