Stupid cherry aging question...

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Dear All,
This is so off the wall, I cannot wait for C-less to chime in, but...
As some of you have seen, I am working on a small cherry clock right now. On my last cherry clock I did lye dye job and I really liked the deep red cherry look, as did the person I gave the clock to. This time though, I am treading heavily on the Shaker tradition and I think I might end up getting haunted if I dye the clock with lye.
I know someone who owns a tanning bed and I was wondering if I put the clock on the tanning bed for a period of time if it would age the cherry quickly?
Thoughts?
Seeing as the sun is soon to never rise again here in the GWN until spring again, I don't have the option of just leaving it outdoors on sunny days for a week like youse guys down south do.
Any other options for artificially quickening the darkening process of cherry?
Thanks,
David.
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My guess is that it is not "off the wall" and that it would work. Likewise with black lights, or any source of UV.
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On Sat, 25 Oct 2003 20:11:30 GMT, "David F. Eisan"

Don't do it, you'll likely be disappointed. Let the cherry age on its own for a beautiful color. I keep cherry out of the sunlight.
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My bet is that UV light would work to darken the cherry, but the quality of the color could certainly be tested with a scrap piece of the same project under UV ... who knows, it may be what he's looking for.
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David Eisan asks:

Well, a deep mahogany stain....No? When you stop screaming, I suggest you take a couple boards and stick them in your pal's tanning bed. Make them freshly machined and see what a few hours does.
Who knows. It just might work. Sounds at least semi-logical, anyway.
And report the results, please. Inquiring minds would like to know. As would us nosy bastards.
Charlie Self
"Middle age is when your age starts to show around your middle." Bob Hope
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NOOOOO!
The surface'll turn ugly gray and lose a lot of chatoyance. Make sure you've got a coat or two of cut linseed in it before you try the UV.
Nice thing about air-dried cherry is that it's already got some maturity on the patina when you use it. KD stuff is generally steamed at the last to relieve case-hardening, and it looks sorta muddy and light.

take
freshly
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Did a little research. According to Michael Dresdner, it works ... FWTW. I'd still try it on a test piece of the project wood.
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+ + + Since the idea is to pass off the cherry as a mahogany substitute this is a method that historically is eminently correct. PvR
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PvR responds:

True, but...somehow, the elegant deep red of mahogany (and cherry) ahs been transformed by the U.S. furniture industry into a solid black that may get 3 drops of red pigment per 50 gallons of finish. It's not really ugly, but it's also not really cherry or mahogany. But, then, neither is the wood used, so I guess that's fair.
Charlie Self
"Criticism may not be agreeable, but it is necessary. It fulfils the same function as pain in the human body. It calls attention to an unhealthy state of things." Sir Winston Churchill
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On 09 Nov 2003 12:16:53 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

The cherry stains used by furniture factories look fake next to my cherry pieces that have aged naturally over time. These factory pieces may just as well be painted and/or made from plywood. Recently my sister-in-law asked about the wood grain lines in my table. She never saw naturally-aged cherry wood!
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Sorry if this is the original "option" but I didn't see the original post...
Aging with Lye works VERY well and is extemely easy to do. I used about 1 of the plastic spoons of lye to a cup of water and then just sponged it on after planing and again after sanding.
If you are seeing any residual lye after it dries, your using too much lye (or not enough water).
Jim
schreef

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I have tried the catalyzed two part aging stuff (sold through Woodworkers Supply - search for "old growth"). It produces a nice warm tint that looks nice. My oldest try with it is about a year old now. I would use it again.
Jim K.
Jim wrote:

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All lye does is speed up the natural process; it is not a stain or artificial color. The Shakers approved of modern technology and were very adaptive to mass production for use by outsiders (chair factory, etc.). Have at it!
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Alan Bierbaum

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snipped-for-privacy@rogers.splinter.com says...

David -- I did a quickie cherry-aging job earlier this year by leaving the finished article in the sun on my driveway for a few afternoons. This substantially darkened the cherry, though it was not a substitute for normal aging. I rotated the object occasionally to get uniform coverage. If it's too late for that, you might want to use the lye method again. It's not a dye, but a sort of accelerant. If Shaker ghosts bother you afterward you can threaten them with a can of stain.
Abe
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Why can't we just wait and enjoy the natural coloring process, which takes at most a year, especially if you use linseed oil on the cherry first. Sunlight can actually BLEACH the color,for what it's worth.
says...

now. On

am
getting
clock
quickly?
spring
for
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says...

You've got to be kidding. I've got cherry stuff I built 10 years ago and it still gets a little darker every year. I'll be dead long before it gets deep red (if cherry actually does that without stain).
--
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I have a set of cherry chairs that I finished with linseed oil and beeswax and placed in the dining room (window faces north). Within a month they were deep red. Now it's three years later but I can't tell any difference since the first year.
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Abe wrote:

LMAO... Minwhacks "Red Cherry" at that! :)
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Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
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In article

Hi David. I ain't SansCee, but perhaps you'll take a liking to my response.

<...>

I have many thoughts. Deep thoughts. Not so deep thoughts. Thoughts that will surely make me go blind. (BTW, I like those thoughts the best.) But I only have ONE thought when it comes to finishing cherry.
Fume it. Fume it with ammonia just like you do the white oak. Then finish off with an oil (then varnish or shellac if desired). I guarantee you'll love it - or else you can just dispose of that clock by sending it to me so's you won't have to look at it any longer.
Somewhere's around here, I gots pitchers of a fumed quartersawn cherry hand mirror I Valentined my wife a couple years back. Let me see...
Ah yes, here you go: <
http://users.easystreet.com/onlnlowe/misc/fumedcherry2.JPG
<
http://users.easystreet.com/onlnlowe/misc/fumedcherry3.JPG
<
http://users.easystreet.com/onlnlowe/misc/fumedcherry.JPG
This item was fumed about 12 hours. Don't forget what Paully would say.
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Howdja take a picture of a mirror without showing yer face in it?
Fly-by-Night CC wrote:

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Gerald Ross
Cochran, GA
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