Staple gun recommendation

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I think I need a pneumatic stapler for a project. Will be installing a 1/4" layer of plywood over an old 1950s 3/4" plywood floor that has a few weak spots and had vinyl flooring on it. Still have some glue spots from the old vinyl. Will be installing sheet vinyl over the new floor. Thinking the 1/4" layer of plywood will strengthen and smooth the old floor so it can accept the new sheet vinyl. Will also glue the 1/4" plywood to the old floor. Kitchen is about 10' by 10'. Three or four sheets of 1/4" plywood should cover it. Thinking the best way to fasten the plywood is with a whole lot of staples.
Recommendation for a pneumatic stapler to attach the 1/4" plywood to the old 3/4" plywood subfloor. I'd prefer to keep the cost to a minimum since this is really the only job I can think of for this stapler. I already own a small compressor that should be able to power a stapler. I don't think staplers capable of going through 1/4" plywood use a lot of air power.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

If anything, I'm curious whether the 1950s 3/4" plywood might to tougher to drive staples into than the new 1/4" plywood. Of course, I'm probably the only one here who doesn't know the answer to that question...
Bill
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On Sun, 3 Apr 2011 18:33:31 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com"

I'd rip out all the old flooring, check the joists near the soft spots and sister in wood if needed, and use regular flooring ply instead of 1/4" underlayment. If you get a 300+ pound person standing on a soft spot with a measly 1/4" ply over it, they might go through. Think what that'd cost you. 23/32" tongue and groove Plytanium OSB is $15/sheet in bundles at Homey's Despot. Glue and screw it. Check for partial bundle pricing. 1-1/8" plywood sheathing is about twice that, but still worth it.

If you go with the underlayment, either rent an underlayment stapler or use a 1/4" crown stapler, Russ. Here's a perfectly functional model for dirt cheap. I've used mine for 5 years now without a hitch. It skips beats (misses a staple or nail) about as often as any other brand as far as I've seen. http://www.harborfreight.com/18-gauge-2-in-1-nailer-stapler-97524.html $20 on sale, adding $13 for staples. http://goo.gl/L7Gac Flatten the floor and glue down the underlayment, too!
-- Not merely an absence of noise, Real Silence begins when a reasonable being withdraws from the noise in order to find peace and order in his inner sanctuary. -- Peter Minard
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Use "diversion" staples from the pneumatic gun. They are designed to hold better. The tips flare opposite directions when shot.
I would nail it down without glue for the next vinyl replacement, making it much easier.
I frames a 1700 square foot bungalow with a walkout basement using a cheap, small compressor. PITA but you fire three nails and then wait a few seconds. A small staplers won't make you wait much at all. You have to move your knees occasionally.
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wrote in message
I think I need a pneumatic stapler for a project. Will be installing a 1/4" layer of plywood over an old 1950s 3/4" plywood floor that has a few weak spots and had vinyl flooring on it. Still have some glue spots from the old vinyl. Will be installing sheet vinyl over the new floor. Thinking the 1/4" layer of plywood will strengthen and smooth the old floor so it can accept the new sheet vinyl. Will also glue the 1/4" plywood to the old floor. Kitchen is about 10' by 10'. Three or four sheets of 1/4" plywood should cover it. Thinking the best way to fasten the plywood is with a whole lot of staples.
Recommendation for a pneumatic stapler to attach the 1/4" plywood to the old 3/4" plywood subfloor. I'd prefer to keep the cost to a minimum since this is really the only job I can think of for this stapler. I already own a small compressor that should be able to power a stapler. I don't think staplers capable of going through 1/4" plywood use a lot of air power.
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I'd use a crown stapler - if you have the width - larger the better - and in Stainless Steel. The SS will last and last - while steel might rust and the floor get bouncy.
I drive staples through 1/4" ply and into hardwood. The pressure is regulated low and it is really a small volume of air needed.
They run them off CO2 tanks and compressors. Tiny compressor that has the pressure needed - will fill the unit - It is a small piston.
Martin
On 4/3/2011 8:33 PM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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Framers use bare steel nails because they can come out easily for modifications until the corrosion sets in and then they hold very firmly. The rust is wanted in damp wood.
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"Martin Eastburn" wrote in message
I'd use a crown stapler - if you have the width - larger the better - and in Stainless Steel. The SS will last and last - while steel might rust and the floor get bouncy.
I drive staples through 1/4" ply and into hardwood. The pressure is regulated low and it is really a small volume of air needed.
They run them off CO2 tanks and compressors. Tiny compressor that has the pressure needed - will fill the unit - It is a small piston.
Martin
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"Josepi" wrote in message
Framers use bare steel nails because they can come out easily for modifications until the corrosion sets in and then they hold very firmly. The rust is wanted in damp wood. &&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&& Wrong. They have a thin colored coating, usually orange brown or green. That is a heat glue, more like cement, that holds the nails. Thus they are called coated sinkers, and the power nails also have a coating that holds almost instantly, when the nail heats up from being driven in so quickly.
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It must take a few weeks for the glue to cool down.
That package information is just a bunch of nonsense, People using them know better.
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"Morgans" wrote in message
Framers use bare steel nails because they can come out easily for modifications until the corrosion sets in and then they hold very firmly. The rust is wanted in damp wood.
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"Josepi" wrote in message
It must take a few weeks for the glue to cool down.
That package information is just a bunch of nonsense, People using them know better.
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
You are so full of shit, your breath must stink.
How many framing power nails have you ever tried to pull out? Me? Plenty.
I teach high school kids how to build houses. They get it wrong, plenty. Then the nails must be pulled out.
They hold nearly instantly, just fine.
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Your definition of "holding" must be fairly lame. If they held that well your wood wood be a trhrwo away every time. Judging by the intelligence of your response you obviously didn’t think much about it..
The steel nails they use have no pink, blue or purple on the tips. They hold much better after a few weeks of corrosion inside the wood.
Don't quit your day job and attempt the real world of construction.
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"Morgans" wrote in message
It must take a few weeks for the glue to cool down.
That package information is just a bunch of nonsense, People using them know better.
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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@Josepi/Bengi/Janice in commenting like:
/chipped

fuller. .. eyes are brown.

The L00n uses trade mags, online tutorials and past topical posts to get the material for the bait. It is a successful strategy for him in those groups he targets. Very big on baiting DIY types - he spent quite some time in <alt.home.repair> trolling those regulars, successfully. The initial posts are enough to get the gullible rolling along. Where he falls over is in the detail, like knowing the actual behavior of reactive power (his electrical experience is as a "stripper" in a battery recycle yard), the performance of critical mass in a gaseous compression cycle, and of course the behavioral characteristics of a poor nntp binary posting together with "how to follow up to a text post"<BG>
No doubt your issue with framing nails fits in there somewhere. However, given your experience around the halls of Usenet, I *am* surprised to note you feeding IT. Hence you get a bite at the hook from myself. Having taught Trade (in another Life) it does give me the "irits" also, in seeing his deliberate misinformation being put to press, however it is taken as a given those with enough skills to access Usenet also holds sufficient life skills to know a dickhead when they read one. Until some hopeful bites it is best to just ignore the drivel. He _will not_ "go away" but at least the NG can deny him any Voice. Post "heads up" (only) for newbies blinking.
The actual intent he has is to play on the egos of differing personalities amongst regulars in motivating contradiction, and thereby confusion. Plenty have self destructed before today under his influence. It is your free choice to join that list :-]
cheers george
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The glue is absorbed in the raw edge of wood just cut. Just try to pull out the nail or staple if placed wrong - you get wood also.
Martin
On 4/4/2011 7:03 AM, Josepi wrote:

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The point was completely moot at any rate. The nails I was referring to were hand driven nails most of the experienced framing crews use here. They have no glue and hold enough to frame but come out easily for the first few weeks only. Almost perfect system. I was distracted from the real issue by a random snipe.
Have you seen staples for a small gun with the `heat sensitive adhesive`on them. I haven`t seen any.
----------------- "Martin Eastburn" wrote in message
Framers use bare steel nails because they can come out easily for modifications until the corrosion sets in and then they hold very firmly. The rust is wanted in damp wood.
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"Josepi" wrote in message
Framers use bare steel nails because they can come out easily for modifications until the corrosion sets in and then they hold very firmly. The rust is wanted in damp wood.
=================================Go get you a box of 1d coated sinkers. That is what most framers hand drive in 2 x 4's. put a few in your mouth to hold them like some old timers used to do.
Tell me what your lips and teeth look like, after a few minutes with a half-dozen of those nails in your mouth.
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I would have no idea what 1d coated sinkers are. Our nails are not classified that way but rather by inches of length.
I used a lot of barbed nails for my latest home construction at 3 times the price of the regular air nailer units. They had the coated tips on them and barbs. Yes, they were horrible to pull out again, immediately or any time. They were not supposed to corrode as they were all galvanized also. Perhaps that was why they came barbed???
Another point o mention, I understand that in the USA the clipped head varieties are not legal anymore or are going away? A freshly driven clipped head nail with a barbed shaft would pull right through a spruce 2x4 as the hold was stringer than the pull of the head. I can understand why they may be done away with, there.
Some other framers arrived to assist putting the trusses up and like the other crews I have seen here they did not use nailers but wore the apron full of 3.5" ardox bare steel nails. They were all taught using nail guns in framing school but soon gave it up for practical reasons. . They were easy to correct with any decent hammer in the next few days. After a few weeks this was not the case, anymore. The corrosion, and perhaps the wood healing somewhat, made them almost as hard to pull as the barbed ones. Sheeting was hand tacked by all and followed by a nailer used by the first year apprentice when they didn't need him.
A few dozen framers I have worked with never used power nailers. First, in Canuckistan they run $500-800 for a decent cordless unit. The same units that sell at HD in the US for $2-300. The companies didn't want to supply them, at that price and have them wrecked or stolen frequently. They corded units are too dangerous and clumsy to drag up when climbing wooden structures and old fashion ardox steel nails work better for reasons stated above. They don't have to listen compressor noise drowning out the satellite rock music blasting, either. They never put them in their mouths but handy in their aprons.
All the best.
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"Morgans" wrote in message Go get you a box of 1d coated sinkers. That is what most framers hand drive in 2 x 4's. put a few in your mouth to hold them like some old timers used to do.
Tell me what your lips and teeth look like, after a few minutes with a half-dozen of those nails in your mouth.
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I have boxes of staples in the shop with glue. It is what binds the staples together.
Some / most/ many / framers use nails on a wire. The wire is cut off as the nail drives in. Others have tape on the sides.
Martin
On 4/4/2011 10:01 PM, Josepi wrote:

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I doubt that is the heat sensitive glue we were discussing. Most nail strips have glue that binds them together but it is not for the intent to "glue them" into the wood.
The glue being referred to is supposed to glue the nails to the freshly ripped open, wet, ends of wood fibres, immediately after the nail is fired. Wishful thinking, at best.
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"Martin Eastburn" wrote in message

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Josepi wrote:

I dunno. The finishing nails/brads I use are a bitch to remove. . .
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Mine are too. (tough to get out) They typically pull through the garbage board baseboard and casing moldings when mistakes are made, but they have no coatings on them. But then I use 15ga. bare steel 2.5 inch finishing nails in my gun to get a good grip. The 18ga. ones, and it becomes hard to dive a long one that skinny, just pull out with your fingers, well sometimes...LOL
The old one I have to clip off with a side cutter and bend over to reset the molding back in place.
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"HeyBub" wrote in message
I dunno. The finishing nails/brads I use are a bitch to remove. . . -------------------------
Josepi wrote: I doubt that is the heat sensitive glue we were discussing. Most nail strips have glue that binds them together but it is not for the intent to "glue them" into the wood.
The glue being referred to is supposed to glue the nails to the freshly ripped open, wet, ends of wood fibres, immediately after the nail is fired. Wishful thinking, at best.
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"HeyBub" wrote I dunno. The finishing nails/brads I use are a bitch to remove. . .
Yep. More often than not, the nail BREAKS OFF before it comes out, but some here say it has to rust for couple weeks. BUULLLLL SHIVICK !!! says me!
-- Jim in NC
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