splitting wood

We have a very nice dresser that was custome made. It is about 5 years old, and I noticed on the side of the dresser that it is starting to split from the bottom. It appears the split it where two pieces of wood have been joined. I don't have little experience with woodworking. I don't really want to spend the money to have someone repair it either. I have read on sites that it should be disassembled to fix. Is there anything else I can do to fix it? The dresser is made of cherry, it has no finish. We have moved from where it was made, so the craftsman can't fix it. Can I use like Miniwax wood filler? I have talked to some people and they said Gorilla glue is good to use it to stop from splittle and then fill it. I think the split started from not oiling it and the wood dried out. Also, whats a good product to keep wood from drying and splitting.
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On Feb 3, 11:17 am, snipped-for-privacy@students.uwlax.edu wrote:

It's likely that a wide piece on the side is a loose panel, and not really structurally stressed; ignore the split, in that case. If it's really a wide joined panel that IS under stress, there are cheats (ask at a hardware store about a Kreg jig or similar pocket-screw system) that won't require disassembly. I hope moderate clamp pressure closes the crevice?
Under no circumstances should you try to dribble glue into a void in a good piece of furniture.
I know only one product that keeps wood from drying, and polyethylene glycol is only applicable to raw wood, not to a finished furniture item. Furniture lasts so long that other moisture-control measures (paints, oils, waxes, etc.) are all doomed to failure, though (of course) a museum-quality moisture/temperature controlled environment could work.
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snipped-for-privacy@students.uwlax.edu wrote:

That would be a "failed glue joint", not a split. ________________
I don't have little

Depends. How long and wide (the crack) is the failed joint? ____________________

Bad advice. ____________________

Oiling wood doesn't keep it from "drying out". When the piece was made, the wood was (should have been) at the proper moisture content. It isn't going to chamge much from that unless it was made in a rain forest and you moved to a desert. _____________________
Also, whats a good product to keep wood from drying and splitting.
As stated above, it needs nothing. Any finish - including an oil finish - is for esthetics and to make it easier to clean.
whether the separation is a real split or a failed glue joint, neither should have happened if the wood was properly seasoned prior to construction and if the maker did not "tie it down" so it could expand and contract with seasonal changes. IOW, sounds like the maker did a bum job.
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dadiOH
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Please< I just do not understand: You have a very nice custom made dresser and you do NOT want to pay to have it fixed! I repair alot of furniture and this repair, even with pick up and delver probably would be over $100.00. Please hire a professional or do not do anything!
good luck mike
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dadiOH wrote:

That's kind of harsh. It is entirely possible what happened is not the maker's fault, whether it got overstressed during a move, or kids are involved or perhaps it was a problem with the glue. There are lots of possible reasons for an otherwise well made joint to fail or a piece of wood to split.
As to the original problem, ask a professional for an estimate. An estimate should cost anything and if you don't know where to look for a pro, post your location (city and state is enough) and someone can likely recommend someone.
ron
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Again, if you can take a pic and post to alt.binaries.pictures.woodwoarking, we can be of MUCH greater help!
-Zz
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An excellent suggestion! Without a picture it's difficult to really understand the problem. If the "split" is really a glue line that let go, the panels may not have been truly parallel to begin with. A proper glue joint is stronger than the adjacent wood and should hold beyond failure of the wood itself. If the "split" is truly in the solid wood itself, you could have a seasonal moisture differential that's drying the wood too much and causing the split.
All wood products survive best in a controlled environment. And that doesn't mean museum quality either. I live in Canada where the seasonal changes are drastic. My central air conditioner removes moisture in the summer and I run a humidifier during the very dry winter. My furniture, hardwood floors and even two guitars do experience seasonal changes to their structure. But all are in good condition because the change in moisture levels is controlled to within a 25% differential.
If you can post a photo I'm sure the collective experience of the regulars here may produce a solution. You could also take the photos to a professional repairer who could offer an estimate for repairing your custom made piece.
Good luck.
Michael
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