Source for Black Laquer

I just read through a search on Google and found some interesting stuff but no real source for black laquer. Can I buy straight black laquer or do I have to mix clear with a pigment or dye? I'm looking to build a case for video tapes and hope to use my new HVLP sprayer to put on the finish. Recommendations for this would be helpful as well since I've never ised laquer or the HVLP gun.
Thanks in advance Ron
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Target Coatings sells their PSL (Premium Spray Lacquer) in black. PSL works well for me in my HVLP unit. They have a web page, check on Google.
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Black lacquer is available thru any industrial supplier, If you cannot find one then you can get it from any Auto paint store.
Look in you Yellow pages for paints, wholesale, Industrial, In every major city, Shrwin Williams has one Industrial Center, for lacquers etc that is where you want to go, The other million Shewin Williams stores are for house paints, some stains etc. Some will get you the lacquers, some do not want to be bothered.
Buying Lacquer form the Auto Industry can get quite Expensive, Higher Quality not required for wood. But it does a great job.
Good Luck, George

works
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The lacquer from www.targetcoatings.com is WATER based so it is not hazardous. I have had very good luck with it and it is easy to clean the hvlp equipment after use. The coats of lacquer "burn" together when you apply them. This means that you do not get witness lines if you cut through an outer coat when rubbing out the finish.
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On Wed, 22 Oct 2003 20:07:01 -0400, "David Chamberlain"

How does water based lacquer burn in? Isn't that a function of the solvent in subsequent coats?
I'm not familiar at all with the stuff, but I'm intrigued. I would love to use lacquer that isn't an extreme health and explosion hazard.
Barry
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I don't know how they do it but their ads claim that the layers do burn together. I do not that I have rubbed out runs and have not gotten witness lines unlike some other products. I have used the lacquer for the past two or three years and I find it very accommodating. I can put on three, four or sometimes five coats in one day. After the first coat, I sand with a 440-600 foam pad to knock off the raised grain. I usually find that three coats is more than adequate for my furniture so I can get one side completely finished and make a good start on the second side in one day.
I copied this from their site:
Oxford Premium Spray Lacquer (PSL) is a unique water-based hybrid, copolymer acrylic engineered to provide the discriminating finisher with a water-white, 100% burn-in coating that will out perform typical nitrocellulose lacquers and catalyzed finishes. Developed for high-end applications where durability, chemical resistance and ease-of-use is mandatory. Oxford Premium Spray Lacquer will out perform conventional nitro-lacquers and CAB Acrylic systems without the environmental and safety issues associated with solvent based products.
Ideally suited for kitchen cabinets, high-build lacquer applications or flush-fill production runs, Oxford Premium Spray Lacquer offers a ready-to-shoot, one-part finish that matches conventional lacquer dry time and recoat schedules. By offering a higher solids content, Oxford Premium Spray Lacquer lowers VOC emissions upwards of 50%*. Engineered to be HAPS Free (Hazardous Air Pollutants) Oxford Premium Spray Lacquer eliminated hazardous solvent exposure in the workplace.
Oxford Premium Spray Lacquer offers versatility and flexibility in application and final finish needs. Oxford PSL is engineered to handle a wide range of spray applications such as, Conventional, HVLP and Airless/Air-Assist. Oxford PSL can be wet-sanded and polished without the worry of exposing witness lines due to its' unique burn-in characteristics. Clarity and depth-of-image is exceptional, allowing for a bright, high gloss clear coat over dark woods and stains. Oxford PSL readily accepts tints and dyes and can be color adjusted with Trans-TintT Dyes.
Available in Gloss (1000) and Satin (1500)
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www.targetcoatings.com has some good stuff. I used their spray lacquer extensively and have had great luck. They have white and black but in matte finish. I used the white for the inside of some cabinets and it worked great. I am not sure if you could spray some clear gloss on top of the matte black?? Here is the black lacquer: https://www.targetcoatings.com/fz/xcart/customer/home.php?cat '7
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Touchup Depot located in Baytown, Texas has a variety of pigmented lacquers for sale. I have had excellent service from them. You can contact them at www.touchupdepot.com or at 1 (866) 883-3768. They provide very fast shipping/delivery times. Be warned, lacquer is a clasified as hazardous shipping material and carries a premium handleing and shipping charge regarless of who you buy it from.

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When my father painted cars as a hobby, he use to buy black laquer from Auto paint suppliers in quart cans.
Ms Leslie

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"Ron" <> wrote in message

Buy straight black automotive lacquer. Buy gray auto primer and a gallon of lacquer thinner. Buy a tube of spot putty. It is thick primer in a toothpaste tube. It is nice to have some automotive paint fish eye remover. It comes in a can like lighter fluid or a bottle like contact lens cleaner. Sand your work first. If you don't have a DA air sander, you can use an electric orbital. Use a 320 grit if the wood is already real smooth. Prime with the gray lacquer. You can start with a 20% paint 80% thinner ratio. It helps to strain the primer into the gun cup through a regular paper strainer. If the primer is not filling the sandpaper scratches and seems too thin, add a little more primer up to 30%. You can return unused primer to the can. Prime the shit out of the work and don't worry about runs, you're learning and it won't matter with primer. Let the primer harden (dry) well. Lacquer shrinks when it hardens. In AZ it will dry in 5-10 minutes. On the east coast it may be a half hour. Don't worry about blush in the primer coats, but if you get blush with the primer, you are definitely going to get it with the black paint. It's a hint to wait for a dryer day, drain the compressor, etc, Never paint lacquer under 55 degrees. The hotter the better. The dryer the air, the better. The more expensive (higher grade) the thinner, the less chance of blush. Retarder can be purchased and used in the thinner and paint mixture in the cup. A shot of retarder in the cup usually does the trick, but makes the paint slower to dry, and can cause runs if you stand on the gun too much. You should be shooting at about 35 lbs or less pressure with lacquer. Once the primer dries, block sand it with 400. Blow off the work with air. If you see scratches that weren't filled, use a little rubber squeegee like for putting on window tint, and squeegee some body putty over the imperfections. After the putty dries, block sand it and primer again. You can repeat this process of priming and sanding until your work is as smooth as plexiglass and feels like it when you touch it. Blow dust off, and make sure your area is clean. Tack it off with a tack rag. It will be smooooth. Now mix your black lacquer and thinner and spray double pass over the work. Don't blow paint on dry. make sure your overlapping coats are wet, as with a spray can. Look for imperfections. It's still timely for putty or sanding, you simply go back to the priming process when it all dries. If all is well, wait for the lacquer to dry a little, say 10 minutes or more , and do another pass. In Phoenix, wait 3 minutes. Patience in applying the lacquer will put you ahead of the others in skill. You need about 3 double passes to cover. Because you may not hold the gun even at first, you may want to make about 5 double passes or so to cover adequately. If you see blush on any pass, stop immediately and add retarder to the cupabout an ounce per full cup.. Make a fast pass over your work with the retarder, and watch it for a few minutes to see if it is getting rid of the white. If not add another shot of retarder to the cup and after a few minutes, do a fast single pass again. If the blush stays, stop working and dump the retarded paint into a clean separate container and wait until tomorrow. Now, the next day, check to see if the retarder worked. If it did (probably) lightly block the work with 400 grit and put on your remaining coats without retarders. If you get blush, see above. If the retarder didn't work overnight, block it out with 400 grit and paint again and use the retarder mix you saved. Always be less agressive painting with retarder mixed in because it slows drying time dramatically, to allow the moisture to rise out of the paint. Now, if you are painting and the surface is contaminated because of silicone or oil in the air or finger oil on the primer, etc, you will see little voids the size of pinheads where the paint won't stick. You may also see them grow larger into chicken pox. Don't panic. Add a squirt or two of fish eye remover to the cup and continue spraying. Fish eye remover works in just about all paints, enamel and lacquer and a little bottle or can will last you a year or more. The fish eye remover makes the paint flow more and increases the chance of runs, so don't stand on the gun. Allow a couple minutes more drying time between coats. I helps make a nice finish though. If after 3 more double passes, you can still see the fish eyes in your work, let it dry and wait until the next day. discard the paint with the fisheye remover, or save it in a separate can.Now after waiting a day,. block the work with 400 grit and paint again with a clean mix in the cup.Lacquer is very forgiving, and you can rework it forever. When you have a nice coat on your work, let the lacquer harden a day or two, or more. Then 1000 grit the work (you can wet sand it), and machine or had buff it. If you find an imperfection while using 1000 grit, go back to 400 or the imperfection area, and shoot another coat. wait a day, and block it with 1000 grit and buff. Your work will look like black chrome. Remember. Henry Ford's original favorite color, black was brush painted lacquer, which was then sanded and buffed to a mirror shine.
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It's been my understanding that you don't use automotive lacquer on wood, as the auto lac won't give like lacs made for wood. ie: it'll end up cracking if there is appreciable wood movement. Any experience to prove that wrong? Thanks!
dave
juan fandango wrote:

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On Thu, 23 Oct 2003 23:55:18 GMT, you wrote:

personally? try FINDING automotive lacquer. if you do find it, it might be very old stock, like 10 years stuff... its not used any more except on very custom cars, due to several problems with it (sunlight fading is a REAL problem), and the new stuff, is not cheap. it 'cracks or chips' real easy too, on cars and thats also a strike against it. I can buy a lot of 'other finishes' for what new fancy car lacquer costs. IMO. --Shiva--
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    Greetings and Salutations.
wrote:

    Well...it depends. MOST of the formulations are "synthetic" lacquers, and have enough plastic in them that they are well able to deal with the movement of woods. There are still some formulations, though, that are "more brittle" and less able to flex, so will cause problems.     Regards     Dave Mundt
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wrote:

One of the worst finishes for handling wood shrinkage is the original Asian urushiol lacquer. The "tenting" failure mode is quite common on old pieces.
AIUI, car paint is flexible, especially some of the modern ones that are usable on moulded plastic bumpers / fenders, but it's not too good on elongation. However items that you paint like this are often made of manufactured sheetgoods (ply, MDF) rather than classic solid timber and are inherently more stable. A coat of impermeable paint then slows moisture transfer further.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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I just bought a gallon of white lacquer from a local Duron store. They stock white and black.
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snipped-for-privacy@usa.xerox.com (Ron) wrote in message

When I refinished a piano bench a few years ago, I contacts Seinway and they gave me their source for what they use on their $20,000 pianos. Now I know why they go for 20 grand, as a gallon of the paint was $100.
Looks great, though.
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