Router speed for raised panels

Page 2 of 3  
Yeppp. you do have to like that "certain" profile that the blade produces.
B a r r y wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Kinda hard to raise a panel that has an arch! :) Using a TS is fine if all you are gonna do is rectangular door inserts.
David
Elwood Dowd wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
They do NOT have to be slowed for vertical.
You do have to have a tall fence and a steady hand.
Any "tiny" little slip and there goes the big old panel.
Yes...the verticals are pretty good size also.
Here is even another way to do it...
http://www.woodworkingtips.com/woodtips/wstip13.html
NoOne N Particular wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

metal
I put a little different spin (pun intended) on this by mounting the router horizontally on the back of the table and built a jig to raise and lower the router, the verticle bit lay in a groove in the table top. lay the panel on its face and route away, small bites and removing most of the wood on the TS worked great on hard maple with a PC690 and a speed control.
-- "Shut up and keep diggen" Jerry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A drawback to the vertical is that they only work on straight pieces of wood. You cannot use them on stock that is curved or rounded.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 03 Aug 2004 21:19:33 GMT, "Leon"

sez who?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
;~) Ok, I'll bite. How can this be done?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Maybe I said that wrong and maybe you misunderstood my comment. What I was trying to indicate was that you cannot use a vertical bit on an end or side of a board that may curve in or out. If you can do this yourself, would you care to explain how this is done?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 04:33:27 GMT, "Leon"

I think I understand you... you're just wrong is all <G>. just to be clear as mud here, we're talking about an arched rather than a bowed panel..... the panel is a flat plane, but it's edges aren't straight.
inside curves are harder than outside curves, especially if the curve is tight- at some point you cannot extend the bit far enough from the base of the router- but-
for serpentine curves make a follower bearing that is positioned above the base of the cutter (pin router style), with the cutter in a horizontal router table.
for single radius curves make a curved fence, again in the horizontal table.
both of these take more setup time than a bearing guided horizontal bit in a vertical table, and may have no benefit over that approach. or, they might. I'll make *that* decision when I'm planning the setup...
for bowed panels, you'd be making a curved *table*....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I sort of understand what you're saying, but it would help tremendously if you could give a link to a picture of the type of setup you're describing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

(about setups for raising arched panels with a vertical bit)

wrote:
On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 12:40:42 GMT, "Leon"

I don't have shots of that kind of setup. mebbe when the table is freed up I'll set one up.
note that what I'm describing is not necessarily "better" than doing it with a horizontal bit with a bearing... just pointing out that it is certainly possible to do with a vertical bit.
nowhere is it written that we must limit ourselves to tooling configurations that someone else thought up. get in the habit of making your own jigs and it'll be a lot easier to think your way through oddball setups.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Do you have any pictures of that set up? I still cannot imagine how that would work.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 03 Aug 2004 21:19:33 GMT, "Leon"

Let's say you have a curved-top panel (or a piece of radiused window casing - that sorta thing) that you want to raise and you want to use a vertically oriented cutter.
(this also works for things like quirk and bead cutters that only come oriented to the vertical)
You cut your panel out in the flat and you take a piece of mdf or ply and cut a radius in it to match the outside radius of the curved part of the panel. This saddle should be no thicker than the minimum finished thickness of the piece that you will sit on it.
Screw on another piece of mdf or ply onto the back of this curved saddle. This provides a backstop so the piece has something to register to. I also put some braces on to give the thing some rigidity.
Clamp this contraption to the fence, or, what I usually do, add a piece of mdf or ply at a ninety on the bottom and clamp the whole thing to the top - and let the fence go visit its relatives for a spell.
Now you raise your cutter to the appropriate height and set the contraption up so that you will take a very light pass when the curved top slides past the cutter in the curved saddle.
Fire up the machine and feed the curved piece into it slowly - making sure to keep it pressed tight to the backer piece that you screwed to the saddle.
Work your way in until your at the full depth of cut.
BTW - I usually hot melt on a couple of blocks to the face of the panel, so as to have a good grip on things. Also, do your curved part before shaping the straight parts - as the failure rate is highest at the curve and it will piss you off less than having to throw away a bad curve after making perfect straights. Then too, I always do the biggest panels first, so that I can cut them into smaller useable panels if I screw them up.
That's about it.
Good Luck.
Regards, Tom.
Thomas J.Watson - Cabinetmaker (ret.) tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thank you Tom, you and Bridger have attempted to explain the error of my thinking and with Bridger's start and your finish I believe I see the light.
Oh, and uh er uh... since you left, the wreck has been much more enjoyable... Not because YOU left but because of those that left just after you did. :~)
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
And the reason for going to all this trouble instead of just using a horizontal bit is ...?
David
Tom Watson wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Vertical bits don't have a speed limitation and don't need to be slowed down to something like 10,000 rpm. Useful for older routers without speed control. This is all aside from the fact that spinning a horizontal bit it quite a bit more scary and has a higher level of danger attached to it than a spinning vertical panel bit.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Upscale apparently said,on my timestamp of 5/08/2004 8:55 PM:

and you can't get undercut profiles in horizontal bits...
--
Cheers
Nuno Souto
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
... or backcutters in vertical bits.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I *think* that that's about what I was describing....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
NoOne N Particular wrote:

He said it was a Freud 3.5" raised panel bit. The Freud vertical panel bits are 1-1/2"d x 3-3/16" h. I'd say it's a horizontal type.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.