router fence plans, movable DC port

For those who have built their own router fence, where did you find the plans, what are the pros and cons, use of t-track, hold downs etc.
I would also like to make the dust collection movable, so that it either collects dust from the back of the fence or on top of the fence. Any suggestions on this feature?
Thanks gang...
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I am planning to build the fence shown at http://www.popularwoodworking.com/features/fea.asp?id 08.
I'm not sure what you meant by moveable dust collection (over the top???). I use a 4" dust collection hose behind the router bit and there is no dust on the table when I finish. I'll build the fence to accomodate the 4" hose connection.
Bob
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Chris Carruth wrote:

"The" ultimate router fence would have to be Pat Warner's. Google Pat Warner and a couple more key words like router and, well, router and see if you can find it on line. It was also published in a past Fine Wooddorking so maybe a trip to the library?

Compromise and go at it in between at a 45?
Actually, unless there is an overwhelming reason to have the port movable you are way better off locating the port somewhere in line with the discharge created by the bit. This way you use those already created forces to your advantage. In fact, based on this tidbit the best spot would be to the right (from the operator's view) of the bit.
UA100, arm chair observer of fluid dynamics...
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wrote:

been playing with the dust extraction on my BARGRT*. I started with the design I see a lot, the cabinet space where the router lives used as a plenum for dust extraction. well, either it was too leaky or something, but it just didn't work well. the chips and dust built up in there and got sucked into the router motor. I tried the DC hose positioned directly above the bit. that worked better, but some chips still made their way into the cabinet, especially on some setups where I couldn't get the top hose connection close enough. I tried 2 hoses, one sucking from the top, one through the plenum. better, but after a while there would still be an accumulation of chips in the router motor intake.
in a brillinat flash of insight I realized that what I needed was *positive* airflow through the plenum. I hooked up a blower to the lower DC port so it's *blowing* the chips up, away from the router motor and straight into the DC port, which is right above the bit.
so far it's working.
*Big Ass Rube Goldberg Router Table
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On Fri, 06 Aug 2004 21:18:03 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@thanks.com wrote:

accomplishment. You must be proud!!!
But seriously, my hunch is that you don't need much positive airflow to get this setup to work. Are you using your shop vac exhaust (which would seem to be sunstantial) or something smaller? -- Igor
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I'm using a squirrel cage blower that I had sitting around. it puts out a pretty good stream of air.
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Chris,
I agree with UA100 about Pat Warner's system. His website is:
www.patwarner.com
His books are excellent and focused. I have been using a design similar to the one Bob proposed and I can't wait to find the time to build my own version of Pat's. The biggest drawback to fence that simply clamp to the table top is repeatablity and fine tuning. You simply can't do it with an degree of accuracy (at least not closer than "I'll nudge this side a little and that will be good"). Pat's design has a base that fastens tight to the table top and is adjustable with a screw that moves the fence laterally.
I just finished making 8 panel doors and none of my rails and stiles are as tight as I want them to be and there are a few little waves in the panels where the fence flexed.
Just my $.02.
Chuck
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American Woodworker mag has published a book "Woodworking with the router" (ISBN 0-7621-0227-6, $20US) which has excellent designs for both a router table and a router fence -- a chapter is devoted to each.
It's the setup I'm gonna build... after I convince my mother-in-law that giving up half her garage will result in her seeing more of her daughter...
rgds, g.
On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 23:19:13 GMT, "Chris Carruth"

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