Roundover Router Bits

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If you were to purchase roundover router bits, what size or sizes would you consider or is essential to woodworking?
Thanks
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SBH wrote:

Depends...
I've found everything from 1/16" to >1" indispensable at some time or another. What are you wanting to round over?
--
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out.
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Leon wrote:

stuff you build.     mahalo,     jo4hn
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I second what Leon stated. I feel there is a need for each size listed in the projects I do. In addition - but this is less often - there may be a need for a 3/4 inch round over. I used this as the predominant bit in the bed I made last year. Marc
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I use 3/16 a lot... for real.
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If you were to

I use 3/16 a lot... for real.
Actually I use a 3/32" a lot, especially for blunting an edge a little more than what a sander would do.
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"Leon" wrote:

These will be your bread and butter bits, especially the small ones.
Buy quality set(s), you will save over time, not only money, but time.
Lew
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I mostly use a sanding block for those kind of edge 'easing'.
That 'easing' of a long piece of oak trim can be fun if you do not use a block, but just a piece of sandpaper. A 2" sliver can then accordion its way into the index finger's 2nd joint requiring surgery.... or si I'm told. I now use an 1/8' for 'easing' oak edges and always climb-cut it in a laminate trimmer. A 3/32"would do just fine as well, except I want to see more results from my efforts...:)
I see GoogleGroups has completely shit the bed.
r
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"Robatoy" wrote

Yeah, don't look now Google, but there's a chink in your armor ... strictly in a manner of speaking, you understand.
I only got two spams this morning using OE and a couple of simple "news rules", but the bastards do appear to be running off the faint of heart/girly men.
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faint of heart/girly men.
ROTFL,,, Nancy Boys, Um here we go,,,,
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Robatoy wrote:

Same here, along with 1/8. Most of my roundovers are small, for breaking edges with a laminate trimmer.
I'm not a big fan of the look of roundovers larger than 3/8 in very many designs. About the only time I use a larger one is to top balance a table edge ogee.
When purchasing roundover bits, selecting bits that can also cut an ovulo, like this: <
http://content.answers.com/main/content/img/McGrawHill/atchitecture/f0692-01.png
can make them much more useful.
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I would start with 3/8" bit and then go from there as needed most wood is 3/4" so a 3/8 bit will just knock off the edge without taking to much.
Randy http://nokeswoodworks.com
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Most wood is 3/4" ?
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Brian
www.garagewoodworks.com
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In my case, yes. If you look at my wood pile, I have one 5/4 piece of cherry, one piece of 8/4 and the rest is 4/4 finished to 3/4". About 85% or more of what I've done is that size.
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The one that looks good for the job at hand. And remember, to do a 3/4" thick piece of wood half way you need a 3/8", not a 3/4". Most of what I do is 1/4" or 3/8", but ymmv
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You may be able to pick up a roundover set with common sizes. You'll probably get 4 or 6 for $10-15 less than what buying individual bits would cost.
Puckdropper
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You can only do so much with caulk, cardboard, and duct tape.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
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SBH wrote:

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but you can't make them THINK"
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SBH wrote:

Initially... 1/4 3/8 1/2
Others when/if you need them
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dadiOH
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"SBH" wrote in message

Since much of woodworking seems to be done on the ubiquitous 3/4" stock, the two most used roundover bits in my shop are a 3/16 and a 3/8.
That said, and except for the fact that you will occasionally have to make an unscheduled trip to the hardware store, the very best way to buy router bits, of any kind, is as you need them.
--
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Last update: 3/27/08
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