Rewiring GI 50-185 saw back to 110V

So I need to rewire my tablesaw back from 220 to 110, and it was a long time ago that I switched it. I'm just looking for some confirmation.
There's 4 wires that are labeled 1, 2, 3, and 4. The inside cover shows that 1 and 3 go together, and 2 and 4. I can handle that... It's the wires coming in from the switch that I don't know what to do with. The green is ground, and that's cool. But nothing shows what to do with the black and white wires.
If I was a betting man, I'd bet that I connect the white wire to one of the two 1/3 or 2/4 bundles, and the black to the other one. But does it matter which one goes to which? Or am I totally off on this? I've got pictures, if that would help.
Since I'm rewiring it so I can demo and sell it, it would be nice if it didn't erupt in a ball of flames... :)
Clint
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the motor won't care one way or another.

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But I'm correct that one goes to one bundle, and one to the other? The wiring diagram doesn't cover either of them.
Clint

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Most 120/240 motors I have seen are set to 240v by connecting #1 to the black wire, #2 to #3, and #4 to the white wire (though the black and white are interchangable.) To set them to 120v you connect #3 to #1 and the black, and #2 to #4 and the white. The idea is that 1-2 is a loop and 3-4 is a loop. In 120v they are in parallel, and in 240v they are in series. Your inside cover SEEMS to be in agreement with that, though I haven't seen it; but I can say with confidence that it doesn't distinquish between black and white.
There ARE exceptions to this scheme. My TS motor has eight wires and nearly all of them get rearranged when changing voltages; but it still doesn't care about white/black.

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From the manual,You might want to look at the inside cover. CONVERTING THE MOTOR TO 220V
Should you need to convert your machine's motor from 110V to 220V power, there is an electrical schematic drawing on the inside
of the motor cover plate. For safety reasons, however, we do not supply instructions for conversion. Unless you are a qualified electrician,
we do not recommend attempting this conversion on your own. If you choose to do so, you may risk personal injury,
damage to the motor, and/or the voiding of our warranty.
We suggest you ask your local General International distributor to recommend qualified electricians in your area (or perhaps one
of their own technicians) who can make this conversion properly and safely.

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wrote:

If the wiring diagram shows a 1/3 and a 2/4 connection for 110v operation, it should also show the 1/3 pair connected either to L1 or L2, and the 2/4 pair connected to the other.
L1 and L2 are the wires from the switch and it doesn't matter which is the black (hot) and which is the white (neutral) wires. IOW, the black wire can be connected to either the 1/3 or the 2/4 pair, and the white wire can be connected to the other pair.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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Thanks all... Got it together (worked fine), sold it this afternoon...
Clint

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