Removing "gook" from saw blades?

HI
I have a carbide tipped 10" blade which is causing some "burned" marks on wood. It occurs when I'm ripping, and have to stop to reposition my hands. As long as I keep the wood in motion, things are ok.
Seems to me I read something about using oven cleaner to remove the build up. Can any one confirm?
Thanks
Jim
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Doesn't have to be that harsh an alkali - use something like TSP -90 wall cleaner, or a dilute version sold as "Simple Green" is good as well. Non-aluminum plate big enough to hold the blade - plastic at my house - solution to cover. Five minutes and perhaps a run at the worst crap with a toothbrush, then a rinse and dry.
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5 gallon plastic bucket. stack the blades with layers of mesh non-slip pad between them. warm the solution. washing soda works fine. 15 minutes or so and scrub a bit with a nylon brush. dry and store.
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wrote:

It will get the sap off but it's messy and kind of a pain. I don't know if cleaning the blade will solve the problem you describe. Another type of blade better suited for ripping may be the answer. We rarely (never) clean our blades but they are always clean when we get them back from the sharpener guy. :-) I don't know what he uses.
Mike O.
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I use spary carburator cleaner to remove pitch etc. stuff runs off...don't breathe too much of it. It'll clean your lungs permanently.
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wrote:

Yes, I use oven cleaner. It will remove any printing on the blade too.
Thunder
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Yes some use it and some use Simple Green. I prefer to use a product specifically formulated for the task and that leaves a protective film on the blade. The other products may cause rust. CMT's Formula 2050. Environmentally friendly, non toxic, works real fast, and my first bottle lasted 3 years.

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On Sat, 29 Jan 2005 23:21:59 GMT, "Leon"

When I think about it, blades cleaned in Simple Green or washing soda still need to be sprayed with Boeshield or something similar to prevent rust. The CMT product probably costs less per application than the others, if you consider the total job cost.
Barry
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Every time I use a router bit I spray it down with the CMT cleaner. Plus, I use the cleaner for everything. It is great for cleaning the smoke stain off the stainless steel on my Smoker. ;~)
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On Sat, 29 Jan 2005 20:50:01 GMT, the inscrutable Jim Laumann

Simple Green is my favorite. Remove the blade, soak for a few minutes in a large pie tin, scrub gently with an old used (wife's/kid's) toothbrush, rinse, wipe dry, and reinstall. You're done in half an hour (with half of that time soaking while you do something else, like clean inside the saw and sweep the floor.)
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Jim Laumann wrote:

Oven cleaner works very well especially with burned resin, but simple green (spray concentrate on the blade, let sit then put into water) probably gets most stuff off and is gentler.
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Simple Green and a stiff brush works quite well, isn't caustic, and is pretty pleasant to work with. I use a brass bore brush (gun) to clean out the gullets and a brass "tooth brush"* to clean the rest of the teeth.
John
*Disclaimer: Do not use brass tooth brush for dental hygiene as, though good for removing plaque, it is too rough on the gums and tooth enamel.
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And washing soda is even easier. Five or ten minutes of soaking in a solution of washing soda (1/4 cup per quart of warm water), and most of the gunk simply rinses away without any scrubbing at all.
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Jim:
I have used Varsol - from Home Hardware or Home Depot. It cleans a lot off immediately. I just wipe the blade down as best I am able getting everything off the teeth edges.
For what is left - I clean the blade right on the saw as follows...
I use the Paper towel like shop towels - blue coloured -- since they are quite tough, and a tongue-depressor-like stick of wood.
1. Unplug the saw. :-) 3. Wet down a shop towel with Varsol and rotate through the blade cleaning the sides as much as possible. Wipe with a fine brass brush and re-clean at this stage if need be - it will make cleaning the teeth go faster. 2. Using a thin piece of wood 1/8 " (3mm) or less -- wrap a torn off piece of paper shop towel around the end two or three times -- it should still lay flat on the stick. (Cut the piece of towel with scissors if you are a neat freak or like precision. :-) ) 3. Apply Varsol to the piece of paper shop towel on the stick - soak it good. 4. Swipe across each tooth till it cleans up. Try tests Test working in each direction ( up and down , across , rotating etc.) till you find the method that tears the towel the least on this particular blade -- and then clean the rest of the teeth in a similar manner. 5. For stubborn scale and baked on gum a thumbnail or brass brush should scrape it off after Varsol has softened it. 6. Give a final clean up with the Varsol soaked rag 7. Test
It usually takes 5- 10 min for a rip (24 tooth) blade, 10 to 15 min for a 40 tooth General Purpose and 15 min or a bit more for a 50-80 tooth blade.
--------- Will
Jim Laumann wrote:

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wrote:

Best thing I've found is "Fast Orange" hand cleaner from the auto parts store. Just smear some on, wait 2-3 minutes and rinse it off. Presto! Clean blade. The cleaner has pumice in it but it isnt a factor since you have to do very little rubbing. A few seconds with a paper towel dries the blade nicely and I've never had any problems caused by water remaining on it.
I've used oven cleaner in the past and it does work well but it's messy and hard on the skin And it took all the maker's marks off the saw so unless you remark it somehow you have to guess what blade it is. I dont know what oven clean will do to a teflon blade. Not good, is my guess.
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