Masonite Hardboard - which blade to use

I "lucked into" thirty or more five foot by nine foot Masonite boards - dark dense 1/4" thick.
I cut a few with a thin kerf carbide blade and then started having troubles - blade (on worm drive skillsaw) would warp and could not cut a straight line - it got "wavy."
I set the depth of cut shallow so as to save the saw horse/support boards from a through cut. I go slow against an edge guide.
The replacement blade I tried was a 150 tooth steel "Plywood" blade from Lowes that just aggravated the problems.
Does anyone have any experience cutting this stuff? I'm planning on covering sixty linear feet of shop wall with it and each board will reguire at least two cuts to "fit."
direct suggestions, advice, replies to gooeytarballs ATSIGN gmail.com please
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Hoosierpopi wrote:

I've had good experiences cutting it with a 10"x100T carbide blade on my table saw and cutting it with a carbide end mill in a router.
Hm, I should add: "You suck!"
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The biggest problem is that the board is probably not laying flat and is supported on the bottom. If is is not it can bind and pinch the blade. Masonite is not particularilly more diffucult to cut than any other thin material. I also suggest you stick with carbide tooth but not the thin kerf.
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Thanks. I did switch to a new HFT 24T or 40T Carbide blade and found it a bit easier. But still getting some smoking and wander. Its not a thin Kerf.
I'll have to run down to Lowes and see if I can get a (7.25" blade with more teeth as running these sheets through my table saw is not an option now absent a helper and a large saw table. I've one more sheet to cut for this wall, then eight more to cut for the other and I'm done. Maybe I ought try building a saw table for the task after this wall. Hmmm.
Thanks again.

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Hoosierpopi | 2009-08-26 | 11:57:40 AM wrote:

Make yourself a circular saw cutting guide, like this: http://wayneofthewoods.com/circular-saw-cutting-guide.html
I put my Masonite on three or more sawhorses (to support both pieces after the cut), then clamp my guide on and cut. I've never had any trouble with wandering, binding, or smoking, and I'm using the stock blade that came with my Hitachi saw.
When you make the guide, the only piece you have to get absolutely straight is the wooden guide block. If you use a router, set up your guide so your saw works on one side of the guide, and your router works on the other.
I used a piece of MDF molding for the guide block. It's nice and straight off the shelf.
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SteveBell wrote:

Maybe I read it too fast, but I didn't see where it mentioned that the guide strip needs to be straight. Good for you for mentioning that.
I found that it's best to just use a piece of 3/4 finish plywood as the guide strip, and make it several inches wide. That way you can screw it down to many sacrificial under-side pieces, or move it back and forth on the same under-side piece.
This way, when you switch saws, blades, tools, or whatever, you won't have to realign the guide strip to a straight line, as the plywood guide strip will stay straight.
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-MIKE-

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-MIKE- | 2009-08-26 | 4:33:35 PM wrote:

I don't trust factory edges to be straight. I used an extruded aluminum straight-edge to align the block on my jig before I glued it down.
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Yeah, tell me about it. See my "crappy plywood" post from a couple months ago.
I actually bought one of those $20 Johnson aluminum cutting guides. The two 4 foot sections are nice to have around and I used one on a strip of hardboard as a four foot and under cutting guide. I keep the other piece for quick clamping to whatever for use with any tool.
I would never trust it (with the two pieces attached end-to-end, as designed) to cut 8 ft. Even if you can get the two sections clamped together perfectly straight, the slightest pressure against it, pushes it crooked.
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I use a third behind the other two to make sure the pieces aren't crooked. This guide is on my list for projects as soon as the weather gets better.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

They only come in two's. :-)
Did you buy two packs, or find the aluminum on your own?
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Two packs (lost the connector on the first during a move).
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

That's a great idea, and it's still worth 40 bucks. The fourth comes in handy to just have on the wall for whenever you need one.
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-MIKE-

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I did make such a guide/ I used some very good 7/16" 11-ply plywood for the guide strip and glued it to a piece of Masonite (the length of the boards I was to rip) and cut using the worm-drive skill saw I am using for the job. (I actually made two of these - one long and another shorter one for cutting the width).
The idea of screwing the two pieces together warrants a revisiting of the guide making as does the idea of using it with a router and making one guide serve the two tools.
I do know of a place that sells aluminum extrusions of up to twenty feet and will look into getting an extrusion to serve as the guide bar/ strip. Maybe some 3/16 C channel about 1/2 inch by 2 inches would do. But it will be expensive I'll bet!
Maybe, with a router, I cut bevel the edges so each sheet would mate up better with the previous sheet. Nah, I'm not that good.
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Show me a Masonite Hardboard skill saw blade and tell me what kind to use
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Show me a Masonite Hardboard skill saw blade and tell me what kind to use
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On Wednesday, August 26, 2009 at 9:57:40 AM UTC-7, Hoosierpopi wrote:

That's the wrong direction. You want LESS teeth, take big bites from the masonite insead of turning it into fine dust. The heat buildup will be less (and the cut less smooth).
If edges matter, apply some shellac and use a hot clothes iron (with some aluminum foil or other adhesion barrier) to flatten the surface.
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On 2/26/2017 5:49 PM, whit3rd wrote:

This should not be burning at all. The blade is probably mounted backwards. It happens.
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On 2/27/17 9:11 AM, Leon wrote:

To the OP: the potential for wandering can be lessened by having as little blade as possible penetrating the surface being cut.
IE: if the material being cut is 3/16", then have the blade depth set to 1/4".
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-MIKE-

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On Monday, February 27, 2017 at 12:04:33 PM UTC-5, -MIKE- wrote:

I hope he's done making his cuts by now. After all, it's been 8 years. ;-)
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No, He was waiting on our answers. :-)
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